Artwork

Content provided by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.
Player FM - Podcast App
Go offline with the Player FM app!

45. Pelvic floor education before birth: The evidence with Kimberley Johnson

52:00
 
Share
 

Manage episode 325926154 series 2935813
Content provided by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

In this episode, I sit down with Kimberley Johnson, a PhD student doing fabulous research in psychology with a specific focus on perinatal and pelvic health to discuss:

  • Birth related pelvic floor trauma and the association with higher rates of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.
  • Kimberley’s personal experience that led to her research questions
  • The study hypothesis -Lack of pelvic floor focused education may be associated with greater distress following pelvic floor trauma and its sequelae
  • The staggering results that demonstrate the lack of information perinatal women are provided and the impact this has on them.
  • Reasons why this information is not being shared by health care providers
  • How we as clients, clinicians and care providers can start to implement this information

Kimberley Johnson, M.S., is an advanced doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Utah with an emphasis in perinatal and pelvic health. Her current research is centered on factors that facilitate adjustment and wellbeing during the postpartum transition period, particularly in the context of birth-related injuries. She has published in the Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy and Journal of Health Psychology and has contributed to postpartum rehabilitation and wellness courses. Outside of her academic and clinical work, she is also a mother of two (to a 3-year-old girl and expecting a baby boy this summer) and loves xc skiing, hiking, mountain biking, camping, and just being outside with her family.

Instagram - @wildmatrescence

Email - kimberley.johnson@psych.utah.edu

Links mentioned in episode:

Kimberley’s research:
The Importance of Information: Prenatal Education Surrounding Birth-Related Pelvic Floor Trauma Mitigates Symptom Related Distress https://journals.lww.com/jwhpt/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=9000&issue=00000&article=99940&type=Abstract

Episode 29- Perineal tears with a urogynecologist

Thanks for joining me!
Here is where you can find more:
my online course to walk you through pregnancy, birth prep and postpartum recovery:
https://mommyberries.com

Want more details on the small groups?
Small Groups

Follow me on:

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Support the Show.

  continue reading

96 episodes

Artwork
iconShare
 
Manage episode 325926154 series 2935813
Content provided by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Melissa Dessaulles from Mommy Berries or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

In this episode, I sit down with Kimberley Johnson, a PhD student doing fabulous research in psychology with a specific focus on perinatal and pelvic health to discuss:

  • Birth related pelvic floor trauma and the association with higher rates of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.
  • Kimberley’s personal experience that led to her research questions
  • The study hypothesis -Lack of pelvic floor focused education may be associated with greater distress following pelvic floor trauma and its sequelae
  • The staggering results that demonstrate the lack of information perinatal women are provided and the impact this has on them.
  • Reasons why this information is not being shared by health care providers
  • How we as clients, clinicians and care providers can start to implement this information

Kimberley Johnson, M.S., is an advanced doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Utah with an emphasis in perinatal and pelvic health. Her current research is centered on factors that facilitate adjustment and wellbeing during the postpartum transition period, particularly in the context of birth-related injuries. She has published in the Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy and Journal of Health Psychology and has contributed to postpartum rehabilitation and wellness courses. Outside of her academic and clinical work, she is also a mother of two (to a 3-year-old girl and expecting a baby boy this summer) and loves xc skiing, hiking, mountain biking, camping, and just being outside with her family.

Instagram - @wildmatrescence

Email - kimberley.johnson@psych.utah.edu

Links mentioned in episode:

Kimberley’s research:
The Importance of Information: Prenatal Education Surrounding Birth-Related Pelvic Floor Trauma Mitigates Symptom Related Distress https://journals.lww.com/jwhpt/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=9000&issue=00000&article=99940&type=Abstract

Episode 29- Perineal tears with a urogynecologist

Thanks for joining me!
Here is where you can find more:
my online course to walk you through pregnancy, birth prep and postpartum recovery:
https://mommyberries.com

Want more details on the small groups?
Small Groups

Follow me on:

Instagram

Facebook

YouTube

Support the Show.

  continue reading

96 episodes

All episodes

×
 
Loading …

Welcome to Player FM!

Player FM is scanning the web for high-quality podcasts for you to enjoy right now. It's the best podcast app and works on Android, iPhone, and the web. Signup to sync subscriptions across devices.

 

Quick Reference Guide