TSB Podcast: Episode 242 – Complex wants their own sneaker marketplace

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In this episode of TSB, Caesar, Geeno, and Dunks are in-studio.

We’ve seen some ugly shoes in our day, but this shoe by Nike might just be one of the ugliest in our show’s history.

Caesar tells the story of how he might have been responsible for Dick’s Sporting Goods changing the name of their sneaker category from “The Score” to “The Win”.

Stadium Goods create a list of the most iconic sneakers of the last decade. And to be honest, we don’t disagree with their list all that much.

In another move that showcases their uncanny ability to always be original, Complex is looking to create their own sneaker marketplace. They’re currently in talks with other established, resell platforms and are looking to place this “new”, and “original”, idea of a sneaker marketplace underneath the Sole Collector brand.

The Brooklyn Nets have teamed up with the GOAT app to licence their players entrance into their arena. They’ll obviously find some way to create sneaker centered content out of this move. Trivial? Sure. But it’s a move nonetheless.

There’s a sneaker app called Poizon that, already in its first year, is generating 3 times the revenue that StockX brings in annually. $2.1 billion to be exact.

And finally, Caesar goes over a controversy brewing at Nike that might explain why Mark Parker stepped down as CEO. Women who were involved in Nike’s Oregon Project are said to have been subjected to mental and physical abuse while participating in the program. Coaches were obsessed with their body and weight, more specifically, their asses. No one seemed to be licensed to do the jobs they were given. One athlete considered suicide. While Nike’s response to all of this so far seems to be “how were WE supposed to know what was happening in OUR program that WE were funding”, the USADA is taking a look at the former head coach, while there are calls for an independent investigation into the now defunct program.

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