Podcast: What is the Significance of Russia's 'Military Revival'?

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By War Studies and Department of War Studies. Discovered by Player FM and our community — copyright is owned by the publisher, not Player FM, and audio is streamed directly from their servers. Hit the Subscribe button to track updates in Player FM, or paste the feed URL into other podcast apps.
Date of Publication: 07/12/2018 Description: The capabilities and the efficiency displayed by Russia’s military during its annexation of Crimea in 2014 and its subsequent air campaign over Syria not only surprised the world but also signalled that Russia was once again a significant military actor. This evidence of an apparent Russian military revival, among other recent events, has increased tensions between Russia and its neighbors as well as NATO and has led many to highlight Russia’s latest military advancements and operations as a major turning point in the post-Cold War era. However, Dr Bettina Renz, associate professor at the University of Nottingham and author of the recent book, ‘Russia’s Military Revival’, argues that although Russia’s recent actions have created serious concerns, this so-called ‘military revival’ may not appear to be as significant of a turning point when put into historical context. So, what is the significance of Russia’s ‘military revival’? On the 16th of November, the DWS and Dr. Natasha Kuhrt, lecturer in the Dept. and co-convener of the Departmental Research Group on Russian and Eurasian Security, hosted Dr. Bettina Renz for a talk on her recent book. But, before this talk, Natasha and Kirk Allen had the opportunity to discuss the significance of Russia’s military revival and its potential threat with our guest lecturer. You can access the recording of Bettina Renz's talk by following this link: https://soundcloud.com/warstudies/event-russias-military-revival _______________________________ For more news and information on upcoming events, please visit our website at kcl.ac.uk/warstudies

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