African American History And Culture public
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Best African American History And Culture podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best African American History And Culture podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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More than 154 million treasures fill the Smithsonian’s vaults. But where the public’s view ends, Sidedoor begins. With the help of biologists, artists, historians, archaeologists, zookeepers and astrophysicists, host Lizzie Peabody sneaks listeners through the Smithsonian’s side door, telling stories that can’t be heard anywhere else. Check out si.edu/sidedoor and follow @SidedoorPod for more info.
 
The Nod tells the stories of Black life that don’t get told anywhere else, from an explanation of how purple drink became associated with Black culture to the story of how an interracial drag troupe traveled the nation in the 1940s. We celebrate the genius, the innovation, and the resilience that is so particular to being Black -- in America, and around the world.
 
This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Each episode features conversations with professional historians who help shed light on important people and events in early American history. It is produced by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.
 
Welcome to Everyday Black History! Where we highlight the contributions of Black Men and Women both Past and present. Here we celebrate Afro Appreciation, where Black American, Africans and Latinos of African descent are honored. We also highlight Institutions that have help the advancement of people in the African Diaspora, such as historically Black University and many others. Enjoy Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/EverydayBlackHistory/support
 
Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.
 
Objects hold history. They're evocative of stories stamped in time. As part of The Washington Post's coverage of the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture, people submitted dozens of objects that make up their own lived experiences of black history, creating a "people's museum" of personal objects, family photos and more. The Historically Black podcast brings those objects and their stories to life through interviews, archival sound and music. The Washingt ...
 
OUR COMMON GROUND with Janice Graham ALTERNATIVE ∞ ACTIVIST ∞ PROGRESSIVE ∞ EMPOWERMENT TALK RADIO “Speaking Truth to Power and Ourselves” XX//^\\XXXX//^\\XX “Transforming Truth to POWER, ONE Broadcast At A Time” XX//^\\XXXX//^\\XX OUR COMMON GROUND explores and examines history and culture, the socio-economic and political issues and conditions of Black people in America. Discussion with our community, “speaking Black truths” toward the best of our collective interests. We present the best ...
 
This is an hour-long episodic podcast series called Oliver Happy Hour. Hosts are siblings (IG: DaisyO - @daisyo, Devy Dev - @dco_love, & Darrin, Darrin - @daredog91) who have degrees and passions in social work, self care and mental health, psychology, african-american history, spiritual development, music and human resources. We blissfully laugh, make up stories, develop ideas, support each other, and share practices that transforms society into a more conscious space of existence. Our desi ...
 
This podcast is all about having those much needed conversations about realities of the everyday struggling African American/Minority group. We also discuss topics that promote Black Culture, Black Ownership, Black excellence,and many more! The goal is to break mental chains through the spread of knowledge/awareness in a sometimes comical yet necessary approach.. Feel free to check out website www.queenquaymo.com Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/queenquaymo/support
 
The Creative Tension podcast explores the history and legacy of Jim Crow segregation. Host, Elliott Robinson provides the missing chapters from American History class, through a mixture of interviews, archival audio and roundtable discussions. Creative Tension also uses open and frank discussions, to dissect how the legacy of Jim Crow is still impacting our world today. Creative Tension explores topics like: Confederate monuments; “The Talk;” Black caricatures (Mammy, Aunt Jemima and JJ Evan ...
 
The Blackbelt Voices podcast propagates the richness of Black Southern culture by telling the stories of Black folks down South. Through first-person narratives and in-depth conversations, hosts Adena J. White, Kara Wilkins, and Katrina Dupins share the experiences of Black Southerners living in, loving, and reconciling with the region we call home. Music: Prentice Dupins Jr. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Hyphenated, the Podcast is a show about cultural identity. Through conversations, reflections and more formal interviews (and with lots of laughter) the show explores how Canadians identify, and how those identities are determined. This show is meant to be a mix of education, comedy, and it hopes to include its entire audience in several conversations about how to make sense of being more than one thing at any given time.
 
TheGrio is the first video-centric news community site devoted to providing African Americans with stories and perspectives that appeal to them but are underrepresented in existing national news outlets. TheGrio features aggregated and original video packages, news articles, and blogs on topics from breaking news, politics, health, business, and entertainment. TheGrio is brought to you through the cooperation of NBC News and the production team that brought you the documentary film, Meeting ...
 
Simply stated, religion matters. Religion matters not only for personal reasons, but also for social, economic, political, and military purposes. Unfortunately, studies suggest that religious knowledge and cultural literacy for any religious tradition is either in decline or is non-existent in the United States, despite being one of the most religiously diverse nation on earth. Today, religion is implicated in nearly every major national and international issue. The public arena is awash in ...
 
On the Shoulders of Giants is dedicated to bringing awareness to the worldwide contributions of the heroes and cultures of the African Diaspora, both of which have given the world hope and freedom. The purpose is to provide an alternative and positive perspective of the history of the African diaspora, which challenges the negative rhetoric that is commonly told of non-white persons throughout the world. Our past is significant because of the plight we have had to overcome and in some aspect ...
 
Our Network is dedicated to spreading the truth, culture, and history of the Melanated Family. Denouncing false truths, white supremacy, and all forms of oppression. We serve to uplift and improve the condition of the neglected and unheard. Join us today and be the difference that you want to see.
 
The National Museum of African American History and Culture’s (NMAAHC) Civil Rights History Project, created by an act of Congress in 2009, is a joint effort of the Library of Congress and NMAAHC to collect video and audio recordings of personal histories and testimonials of individuals—many who are unheralded—who participated in the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and 1960s.
 
Say Something Nice Podcast covers movies, TV shows, music artists and albums, comic books, tech, pop culture news, film news, television news, film history, music history, Motown, Stax, soul music, R&B music, animation, Black & African-American films and filmmakers, and much more. Copyright Say Something Nice Podcast. All rights reserved.
 
Africana Studies offers perspectives, experiences, theories, and criticisms that have been suppressed and overlooked by a white-culture dominant society. In this course, we will discuss the history of ‘a single story’ in higher education, how Africana Studies came to exist, ways in which to perceive phenomena from an Africana perspective, and contemporary issues
 
The National Park Service (NPS) Southwest Archeology Podcast explores archeological projects and historic preservation at NPS sites in the southwest. Get a behind-the-scenes view of how National Park Service archeology works through interviews with park staff, university researchers, and tribal partners. The show is produced by the Southern Arizona Office, and interviews include both NPS employees and partners.
 
On May 12, 2009, the U. S. Congress authorized a national initiative by passing The Civil Rights History Project Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-19). The law directs the Library of Congress (LOC) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) to conduct a survey of existing oral history collections with relevance to the Civil Rights movement to obtain justice, freedom and equality for African Americans and to record new interviews with people w ...
 
We amplify the voices of Black Business Owners and Entrepreneurs to Ignite the Global Black Economy. Through this platform our socially conscious listening community connects with black business owners and their companies to learn actionable tips for building successful businesses. Each week we publish a new, compelling interview with a black entrepreneur who shares their story, teaches us some useful business information, and gives their number one piece of advice for the Buy Black Communit ...
 
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show series
 
Youthful arrogance. Hipster alienation. A lot of reading. A lot of drinking. Struggles to adjust to a land radically different from the one that one has left in youth. Intense wrestling with nearly every major intellectual trend of the last few decades (from hardcore Marxism to intersectionality) to a searing admission of one’s own seeming worthles…
 
In this interview, we talk to Takashi Miura, assistant professor in the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona, about his book Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan, (University of Hawaii Press, 2019). The book examines a category of Japanese divinities that centered on the concept of “world renewal” (yonaoshi…
 
Youthful arrogance. Hipster alienation. A lot of reading. A lot of drinking. Struggles to adjust to a land radically different from the one that one has left in youth. Intense wrestling with nearly every major intellectual trend of the last few decades (from hardcore Marxism to intersectionality) to a searing admission of one’s own seeming worthles…
 
​Brazil’s Grupo Didá, is an extraordinary ensemble of Afro-Brazilian women who use music to fight against injustice and racial inequality. Producer Dan Rosenberg speaks with the group's founder, percussionist Adriana Portela, about how Didá is working to redefine gender roles in Salvador da Bahia, and anthropology professor Andrea Allen (University…
 
Christian Medical and Dental Association's Jeff Barrows talks about how the LA abortion law that was overturn was a reasonable law, as well as how doctors are important in identifying human trafficking victims. FamilyLife's Bob LePine, author of "Love Like You Mean It," connects 1st Corinthians 13 to marriage.…
 
Institute for Global Engagement's Nick Pitts comments on a post of Amanda Kloots regarding the death of actor Nick Cordero, as well the situation with former MLB player Andrew Toles. Historian Jonathan Den Hartog looks at the life of Alexander Hamilton, whose life inspired the hit musical.By Faith Radio
 
The black former soldier choked to death in handcuffs on the floor of a British police station in 1998. CCTV footage taken from the police station showed the 37 year-old father of two gasping for air as officers chatted and joked around him. It took 11 minutes for him to stop breathing. An inquest found he was unlawfully killed but no-one has been …
 
dSoon after atomic bombs exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, MGM set out to make a movie studio chief Louis B. Mayer called “the most important story” he would ever film: a big budget dramatization of the Manhattan Project and the invention and use of the revolutionary new weapon. Greg Mitchell’s The Beginning or the End: How Hollywood—an…
 
In this episode, we focus on one of Eisler’s most controversial works, a reconstruction of the 1st-century Roman Jewish historian Josephus’ account of the events surrounding the death of Jesus and the ministry of John the Baptist, including a new physical description of Jesus that apparently prompted the Christ to appear to followers in America to …
 
Juan Francisco Manzano and Gabriel de la Concepción Valdés (Plácido) were perhaps the most important and innovative Cuban writers of African descent during the Spanish colonial era. Both nineteenth-century authors used Catholicism as a symbolic language for African-inspired spirituality. Likewise, Plácido and Manzano subverted the popular imagery o…
 
In Michelangelo’s Inner Anatomies (Penn State University Press), Christian Kleinbub challenges the notion that Michelangelo, renowned for his magnificent portrayals of the human body, was merely concerned with “superficial” anatomy—that is, the parts of the body that can be seen from the outside. Providing a fresh perspective on the artist’s portra…
 
Today’s episode covers two people in the STEM field. Dr Powtawche Valerino is a mechanical engineer in NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab. And Dr Arthur Walker Jr was a Astro and solar physicist who helped developed and pioneer X-Ray Ultraviolet optics to view the Sun and other optics in Space. Check out the episode to find out more. Enjoy--- This episode i…
 
Psychologist Linda Mintle talks about how the pandemic quarantining has lead to spikes in suicides and marital disputes, and what can be done to remedy these issues. Global Affairs expert David Aikman talks about China's crackdown on Hong Kongers as well as news from Europe.By Faith Radio
 
Epidemiologist Zach Jenkins looks are new evidence of how COVID-19 can cause micro-clots in the blood that can lead to other problems, plus the call by the AAP to reopen schools this fall. Munther Isaac tells the story of Palestinian Christians in his book "The Other Side of the Wall."By Faith Radio
 
In the 1800s cholera was a mysterious disease killing millions around the world. No-one knew how to stop it till an English doctor, John Snow, began investigating the outbreak of 1854. At a time before germ theory was properly understood, many public health experts thought disease was carried on what they called "bad air". John Snow was alone in th…
 
In her nuanced case study of postemanciaption Virginia, Nicole Myers Turner, (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University) challenges assumptions regarding the intersection between black religion and politics in this “signal moment of political and cultural transformation in the African-American experience.” Using traditional archiv…
 
Television informs our perceptions and expectations of leaders and offers a guide to understanding how we, as organizational actors, should communicate, act, and relate. Join NBN host Lee Pierce (s/t) and editor/contributor Dr. Creshema Murray as they discuss Leadership Through the Lens: Interrogating Production, Presentation, and Power (Rowman and…
 
The "guard is tired." With that simple phrase, the newly installed Bolshevik regime in Russia dismissed the duly elected Constituent Assembly in January 1918. And, one might say, so started Russia's century-long interference in elections and electoral outcomes. In his new book Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Inter…
 
In her nuanced case study of postemanciaption Virginia, Nicole Myers Turner, (Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Yale University) challenges assumptions regarding the intersection between black religion and politics in this “signal moment of political and cultural transformation in the African-American experience.” Using traditional archiv…
 
** HAPPY HOUR 104 ** Update: !!Daisy Engaged!! NEW MUSIC Remi Wolf - Hello Hello Hello H.E.R. - I Can’t Breathe - Single Megan Thee Stallion - Girls in the Hood City Girls - Enough / Better Kanye West - Wash Us in the Blood (feat. Travis Scott) - Single Pete Rock & Camp Lo - Meagan Good (feat. Mac Miller) WHAT'S POPPIN BET Awards 2020 goes virtual …
 
The recent incidents of racism, murder, and police brutality, including the inhumane murder of George Floyd, have once again reminded us of the systemic racism that continues to plague America. We know that George Floyd’s murder is not an isolated incident: from Breonna Taylor to Ahmaud Arbery to Tony McDade, to the epidemic violence facing trans w…
 
We explore the life of Frederick Douglass and his famous speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” with Public Historian and Founder of History Alive, John W McCaskill. You can find out more about John and History Alive at their website. Website: https://jwmhistoryalive.com FB - https://www.facebook.com/johnwmccaskillhistoryalive IG - https:/…
 
Alison Melnick Dyer is Assistant Professor of Asian Religions at Bates College. She is an expert on gender and Tibetan Buddhism. She is currently writing a book about the life of Mingyur Peldrön, an 18th century Buddhist nun and religious leader. Melnick Dyer is especially interested in the ways that privilege influences gender in religious communi…
 
In Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture (University of North Carolina Press), Grace Elizabeth Hale tells the epic story of the Athens, Georgia music scene. Hale explains how a small college town hard to get to even from Atlanta gave rise to dozens of great bands. Some of them are household names li…
 
In 1990, South Africa became the first country in the world to ban skin-lightening creams containing the chemical compound hydroquinone. For years the creams had caused an irreversible form of skin damage called ochronosis for the black and Asian South Africans using the products. Rachael Gillman has been speaking to Dr Hilary Carman, one of the ac…
 
In a time of contentious debate over Confederate monuments, Nicole Maurantonio (Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Communication studies and American Studies at the University of Richmond) provides an intriguing look into how revisionist ideas of the Confederacy have seeped into mainstream culture. Based in Richmond, the former capital of the Conf…
 
Smithsonian American Women: Remarkable Objects and Stories of Strength, Ingenuity and Vision from the National Collection (Smithsonian Book, 2019) is an inspiring and surprising celebration of U.S. women's history told through Smithsonian artifacts illustrating women's participation in science, art, music, sports, fashion, business, religion, enter…
 
The exodus—the story of God leading his chosen people out of slavery in Egypt—stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament. But if you listen closely, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption all throughout God’s Word. Using music as a of metaphor, the authors of Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture (Crossway) …
 
The exodus—the story of God leading his chosen people out of slavery in Egypt—stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament. But if you listen closely, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption all throughout God’s Word. Using music as a of metaphor, the authors of Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture (Crossway) …
 
Ahmed El-Shamsy’s Rediscovering the Islamic Classics: How Editors and Print Culture Transformed an Intellectual Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2020) is an astonishing scholarly feat that presents a detailed, sophisticated, and thoroughly enjoyable intellectual and social history of the modern publishing industry on what we today consider ca…
 
Scott Montgomery, crime fiction coordinator of BookPeople, Molly Odintz, senior editor of CrimeReads,andand special guest crime novelist Ivy Pochoda joined host Hopeton Hay to discuss their recommendations of recently published crime novels to read.The books discussed for May were These Women by Ivy Pochoda, The Law of Lines, by Hye Young-pyun, Cat…
 
In the book THE HOUR OF FATE, Susan Berfield portrays the momentous legal battle between 1902 and 1904 between President Theodore Roosevelt and investment banker J.P. Morgan over the government's ability to restrict agreements between companies that would lead to monopolies in their markets. The Northern Securities Case (1904), which established Pr…
 
On the heels of the bombshell documentary “On the Record,” which details the reported sexual abuse of Black women at the hands of Russell Simmons, two of his accusers, Sherri Sher and Drew Dixon, join The Nod to share their personal stories. The conversation continues around the documentary as activist and accuser, Sil Lai Abrams, and author and jo…
 
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