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Since 1980, City Arts & Lectures has presented onstage conversations with outstanding figures in literature, politics, criticism, science, and the performing arts, offering the most diverse perspectives about ideas and values. City Arts & Lectures programs can be heard on more than 130 public radio stations across the country and wherever you get your podcasts. The broadcasts are co-produced with KQED 88.5 FM in San Francisco. Visit CITYARTS.NET for more info.
 
The Boston Athenæum, a membership library, first opened its doors in 1807, and its rich history as a library and cultural institution has been well documented in the annals of Boston’s cultural life. Today, it remains a vibrant and active institution that serves a wide variety of members and scholars. With more than 600,000 titles in its book collection, the Boston Athenæum functions as a public library for many of its members, with a large and distinguished circulating collection, a newspap ...
 
The "Lapses" project, developed for the Pavilion of Turkey, consists of projects that demonstrate how the perception of "occurring events" can vary and lead to the differing narrations of history because of lapses in collective memory. The project has been realized through works by two artists: Banu Cennetoglu's "CATALOG" and Ahmet Ögüt's "Exploded City". Both projects reveal the possibility for diverse memory formations or diverse narratives, conceivable through lapses.??The project is acco ...
 
Maria W. Stewart was America's first black woman political writer. Between 1831 and 1833, she gave four speeches on the topics of slavery and women's rights. Meditations From The Pen of Mrs. Maria W. Stewart—published in 1879, shortly before her death—is a collection of those speeches as well as her memoir, some meditations and prayers. They are political, poetical and sermon all at the same time; but in the mileu in which she lectured, they were a critically important part of the abolitioni ...
 
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Brian Greene is one of the world’s leading theoretical physicists, widely recognized for his groundbreaking discoveries in the field of superstring theory. His ability to clearly communicate cutting-edge science - even bringing humor to abstruse mathematical concepts -- has made Greene a sort of rock star physicist. On February 25, 2020, Brian Gree…
 
In conversation with Andrea Mitchell, anchor of Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC and NBC News Chief Foreign Correspondent Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker are the authors of the #1 bestselling book A Very Stable Genius, a ''taut and terrifying'' account of Donald Trump's ''shambolic tenure in office to date'' (The New York Times). In I Alone Can Fix…
 
With the rise of mindfulness and the growth of brain research, Buddhism and science have become fast friends. Philosopher Evan Thompson is skeptical about the contemporary characterization of Buddhism. His latest book, Why I Am Not a Buddhist, offers both a critique of Buddhist exceptionalism, and a way forward for our globalized and diverse cultur…
 
Professor Adelle Blackett is the chief legal architect behind the International Labour Organization's first comprehensive standards offering protections and rights to more than 60 million domestic workers. In her public lecture to Cornell University, the Canada Research Chair in Transnational Law at McGill University addresses why we urgently need …
 
For the last decade, Roman Mars has been exploring the hidden stories behind architecture and design in his podcast 99% Invisible. He speaks with Nahlah Ayed about how learning to read the secret language of cities reveals reasons for delight all around us, why he sees cities as ‘evolving organisms,’ and how war and disease shape the built environm…
 
This week, we’ll hear how distance has played a key role in psychotherapy – even before the pandemic. Starting with Freud’s treatments by mail, to crisis hotlines, and now mobile phones and Zoom sessions, therapy has long existed outside the doctor’s office. Hannah Zeavin calls it teletherapy, and she explores its history in a new book “The Distanc…
 
Omar El Akkad is the author of American War, a ''poignant and horrifying'' (Washington Post) dystopian novel that imagines a future civil war born from the U.S.'s current destructive policies and impulses. It was an international bestseller, translated into 13 languages, and named one of the best books of the year by the New York Times, NPR, and Es…
 
In conversation with Resmaa Menakem, bestselling author of My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies Robin DiAngelo's New York Times bestseller White Fragility, a ''methodical, irrefutable exposure of racism in thought and action'' (The New Yorker), explores the counterproductive white behaviors that…
 
In conversation with adrienne maree brown Internationally sought-after wellness expert Jessamyn Stanley is the author of Every Body Yoga, ''a clever memoir of a millennial woman's search for self-acceptance'' (Elle) wrapped inside a beginner's manual to asana yoga. A regular contributor to Self magazine, cohost of the Dear Jessamyn podcast, and fou…
 
Mark Carney is the 2020 Reith Lecturer, the BBC’s flagship lecture series. In his lectures entitled, 'How We Get What We Value,' he argues the worlds of finance, economics, and politics have too often prioritized financial values, over human ones. The future depends on reversing that shift. In lecture one, he addresses the changing nature of value …
 
Michelle Zauner is a musician who plays indie pop under the name “Japanese Breakfast”. Zauner grew up in the Pacific Northwest, raised by her mother, a Korean immigrant. As an adult, she moved back to become a caregiver at the end of her mother’s life. Her memoir “Crying in H-Mart” grapples with grief and trauma - but also provides delicious detail…
 
In conversation with Wendy Moffat, Professor of English and Curley Chair of Global Education at Dickinson College and author of the prize-winning biography, A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E.M. Forster A professor in the Pennoni Honors College of Drexel University, William di Canzio has also taught writing and literature at Yale Universit…
 
In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Celebrated for her ''stellar instincts, sturdy craftsmanship and penetrating wisdom'' (San Francisco Chronicle), Yaa Gyasi is the author of Homegoing. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle's John Leonard Award for best first book and the PEN/Hemingway Award for a fir…
 
A former bookseller turned flight attendant, T. J. Newman flew for Virgin America and Alaska Airlines from 2011 until this year. While her passengers were asleep on cross-country red-eye flights, she began to write a novel on whatever she could find during her shifts, including cocktail napkins. After being rejected by 41 agents, she sold Falling a…
 
Lucy Corin is the author of the novel “Everyday Psycho Killers: A History for Girls”, and two short story collections, the most recent being “100 Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses”. On June 23, 2021, Corin talked with Daniel Handler just before the publication of her second novel, “The Swank Hotel”. The book explores mental illness, familial grief,…
 
When we talk about patriotism in America, we tend to mean one form: the version captured in shared celebrations like the national anthem and the Pledge of Allegiance. But as Ben Railton argues, that celebratory patriotism is just one of four distinct forms: celebratory, the communal expression of an idealized America; mythic, the creation of nation…
 
Left-wing and right-wing governments around the world have fallen into the same trap, a failure of leadership to inspire a cohesive vision of society that ordinary citizens can share. What is to be done? Author George Monbiot joins Nahlah Ayed to point toward a new way of conceptualizing the common good, and forging a politics of belonging. *This e…
 
In calling on us to be good ancestors, public philosopher Roman Krznaric is trying to give the discussion about the future a language, an address and a face: introducing us to all the people already working to formalize the practice of thinking long-term for the common good, benefiting both present and future generations.*This episode originally ai…
 
Dr. Jen Gunter is an ob-gyn and a pain medicine physician who writes on topics of sex, science, and social media. A fierce advocate for women’s health, Gunter is devoted to correcting the misinformation perpetuated by the internet around women’s well-being and reproductive health. She is the author of The Preemie Primer and The Vagina Bible. Her ne…
 
When the US Constitution won popular approval in 1788, it was the culmination of thirty years of passionate argument over the nature of government. But ratification hardly ended the conversation. For the next half century, ordinary Americans and statesmen alike continued to wrestle with weighty questions in the halls of government and in the pages …
 
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