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A daily (5-day-a-week) podcast feed of true Oregon stories -- of heroes and rascals, of shipwrecks and lost gold. Stories of shanghaied sailors and Skid Road bordellos and pirates and robbers and unsolved mysteries. An exploding whale, a couple shockingly scary cults, a 19th-century serial killer, several very naughty ladies, a handful of solid-brass con artists and some of the dumbest bad guys in the history of the universe. From the archives of the Offbeat Oregon History syndicated newspap ...
 
Mat Smith hosts the "No Bull, Just Buffs" podcast covering University of Colorado Buffaloes athletics. Whether it's news off the field or the latest action on the court, Mat covers CU athletics with analysis and interviews to keep you connected to the Buffs year round.Find Mat on Twitter @RealMatSmith (twitter.com/realmatsmith).
 
Leadership Portraits is a conversation to inspire the leader in you. Leadership is a lifestyle choice; a set of core values, a culture of the heart. We lead people everyday because we influence people everyday. Please rate & subscribe to this podcast in iTunes to help other people find it more easily. Who can you inspire by sharing this content with them? music from http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music, www.freestockmusic.com, www.audioblocks.com
 
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Everyone thought John Hawk was stealing cattle, and he refused to talk about it. So one night, a group of cattlemen snuck into his camp and assassinated him — and were shocked by the frontier community's response. (Lostine River, Wallowa County; 1881) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1310d-john-hawk-murder-by-vigilantes.html)…
 
Before Oregon was even a state, its territorial government outlawed all booze. Why? It all has to do with a fellow who could probably be called the true founder of the city of Portland — and his ever-bubbling moonshine still. (Champoeg, Marion County; 1844) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1311d-blue-ruin-whiskey-sparks-oregons-…
 
Designed for calm inland waterways, the sidewheel steamboat Alaskan was no match for the massive late-spring gale that pounced on it off Cape Blanco one fateful night in 1889. (Off Cape Blanco, Curry County; 1889) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1311c-riverboat-alaskan-caught-in-offshore-hurricane.html)…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
East Portland's White Eagle Saloon has a colorful past. Over the years, it's been local headquarters for the Polish Resistance, a rough watering hole for sailors and dock workers, and Portland's hottest blues and rock-and-roll hot spot. (Portland, Multnomah County; 1900s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1703c.white-eagle-shangh…
 
The sailor wanted to quit, but the captain didn't want him to; so he deposited a $60 'blood money' bonus with the British consul, as a reward if shanghaier Jim Turk could swindle him back aboard. Unfortunately, they killed him in the attempt. This kicked off a three-act courtroom drama oddly reminiscent of a Three Stooges episode. (Portland, Multno…
 
Four states away from his family, with no living parents, young Carroll Beebe was like a walking, talking invitation to a shanghaiing.... And when he checked into Bridget Grant's boardinghouse, she wasn't slow to accept. (Astoria, Clatsop County; 1885) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1903c.carroll-beebe-shanghaied-539.html)…
 
Astoria shyster L.G. Carpenter coveted Darius Norris's valuable acreage on Long Beach Peninsula. So he got the police chief to arrest Norris on bogus charges, swindled him into signing over his property, and shanghaied him off out of town on a sailing ship. (Astoria, Clatsop County; 1890s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1903b.…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
Let's face it: No one actually knows where the famous English privateer and explorer spent the summer, and his notes, upon his return, were deliberately opaque. But it's possible that his “Nova Albion” was on the Oregon Coast. (Whale Cove, Lincoln County; 1500s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1703b.francis-drake-whale-cove-neh…
 
Oct. 1, 1880, was a very big day in Portland. For the first time in the history of the city or the state, a sitting President of the United States had come to visit. President Rutherford B. Hayes had arrived in Portland the night before and was staying in the Esmond Hotel, the nicest in Portland at the time, on the corner of Morrison and Front stre…
 
The “Mother of Oregon History” fell on hard times in the late 1870s. She never quit, but after she took a job writing for Hubert Howe Bancroft, he took credit for the books she wrote. (St. Helens, Columbia County; 1880s) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1504a.frances-fuller-victor-part2.333.html)…
 
Frances Fuller Victor became the founding mother of all Oregon history, and one of its most important writers of all time. By the time she arrived in the Beaver State, she was already a well-known writer. (Oregon City, Clackamas County; 1865) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1503e.frances-fuller-victor-part1.332.html)…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
The saloon owners won in court, but the temperance ladies absolutely destroyed them in the court of public opinion. Delighted, the preachers and patriarchs who fancied themselves their leaders geared up for victory in the upcoming election ... and seriously overplayed their hand. (Portland, Multnomah County; 1874) (For text and pictures, see http:/…
 
Angry, surly saloonkeeper Walter Moffett attracted a large, hostile crowd with his harassment of a group of ladies holding a prayer service outside his bar. When the crowd rioted and trashed his saloon, he got the Portland police chief — also a saloon owner — to arrest them for instigating it. (Portland, Multnomah County; 1874) (For text and pictur…
 
Very few of Portland's saloonkeepers threw firecrackers at the ladies of the Women's Temperance Prayer League and called them 'damn whores' when they came by to hold prayer services at their bars. But, with apologies to Montgomery Gentry, there's one in every crowd ... and it was usually Walter Moffett. (Portland, Multnomah County; 1874) (For text …
 
Inspired by the successes of temperance activists back east, a group of Portland ladies decided to take their message of abstinance out of the churches and into the streets. They may have been surprised by the reaction they got. (Portland, Multnomah County; 1874) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1902a.temperance-wars-1of4-533.ht…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
College professor's forensic investigation fingered the DeAutremont Brothers in the brutal robbery; after a years-long manhunt, and more than 2 million “wanted” posters, they were caught. But we still don't know the full story. (Siskiyou Pass, Jackson County; 1923) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1701b.part2-deautremont-train-r…
 
After several other attempts to get into the crime business didn't work out for them, the DeAutremont brothers came up with a plan to rob a train at the summit of the Siskiyous. It did not go well — for anyone involved. (Siskiyou Pass, Jackson County; 1923) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1701a.part1-deautremont-train-rob-robbe…
 
It was no "Heaven's Gate" -- "The Way West" was more like the "Ishtar" of the late 1960s. It was spectacularly and expensively shot on location in Oregon, but plans to celebrate its release here foundered in a tidal wave of scathing reviews. (Lane County, Lake County; 1966) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1901a.way-west-movie-s…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
The coroner ruled Thomas McMahon's death an accident, and everyone moved on. But the testimony of witness Eliza “Boneyard Mary” Bunets was suspicious and contradictory. Could she have gotten away with murder? (Portland, Multnomah County; 1878) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1311a-did-boneyard-mary-murder-thomas-mcmahon.html)…
 
“Uncle Joab” was the most famous preacher in the West for a reason ... and that reason was pretty much exactly why the pioneer lawmakers found him to be such a lousy fit for the job of Chaplain of the Legislature. Suddenly they were desperate to get rid of him. But, they'd hired him before his salary was in the treasury.... (Part 2 of a 2-part stor…
 
When the Legislature of the new state of Oregon started looking for someone to serve as the state's first Chaplain of the Legislature, Uncle Joab's name naturally came readily to mind. But it wouldn't be long before they wished they'd never even heard of this plain-speaking, long-preaching circuit rider.... (Part 1 of 2-part story) (Rural Linn Coun…
 
One of the 20th Century’s most influential show-biz men, the Jacksonville native was a Beaver who made it big; he worked on Disney projects and Popeye cartoons and delighted kids as the first Bozo the Clown. (Jacksonville, Jackson County; 1910s) (For text and pictures, see offbeatoregon.com/1310b-pinto-colvig-pioneer-animator-showbiz-legend.html)…
 
This is an episode in our weekly series titled 'Primary Source Tuesday.' Each Tuesday we have a reading from a particularly interesting historical item. Sometimes it's a historical tidbit that wasn't quite beefy enough to make a full column out of; other times, an especially interesting old newspaper article; frequently it's a short story from one …
 
Had James Marshall stayed in Oregon for one more month, he likely never would have left; instead, he headed south and found gold. And the discovery led more or less straight to his ruin. (Sutter's Fort, Calif.; 1848) (For text and pictures, see http://offbeatoregon.com/1702a.oregon-farmer-started-gold-rush-429.html)…
 
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