show episodes
 
Learn Dutch with Free Podcasts Whether you are student or a seasoned speaker, our lessons offer something for everyone. We incorporate culture and current issues into each episode to give the most informative, both linguistically and culturally, podcasts possible. For those of you with just the plane ride to prepare, check our survival phrase series at DutchPod101.com. One of these phrases just might turn your trip into the best one ever!
 
A weekly one-hour conversation with guest experts and callers about travel, cultures, people, and the things we find around the world that give life its extra sparkle. Rick Steves is America's leading authority on travel to Europe and beyond. Host and writer of over a hundred public television travel shows and author of 30 best-selling guidebooks, Rick now brings his passion for exploring and understanding our world to public radio. Related travel information and message boards on www.rickst ...
 
Say it Right in English, Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese, Brazilian Portuguese, Thai, Arabic, Dutch, German, Greek, Japanese, Korean and Russian with one phonetic system based on English. Say it Right in any Language believes that pronunciation is everything. Say it Right language provides a simple and straightforward approach to speaking and learning a new language. It is a fun, fast and easy way to learn new languages using one simple phonetic system called I Say it Right Vowel Symbol Sy ...
 
Polly Lingual is a comprehensive foreign-language education solution combining interactive mastery lessons and live tutors. The languages we currently offer are Spanish, Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, Arabic, German, Italian, Portuguese, Hebrew, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Dutch.
 
The objective of the LowLands Cycling podcast is to get more people cycling or people cycle more and enjoy themselves doing it. I probably must explain what N+1 in the title stands for...amongst cyclist N+1 is a known principle where the letter N equates to the number of bikes you own, ….......the +1 results in always looking to acquire a new bike to add to your collection. Here at Lowlands cycling we take a different angle in addition to the existing N+1 rule. N also stands for: Cycling com ...
 
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show series
 
What is the future of the book? In Book Wars: The Digital Revolution in Publishing (Polity, 2021) John Thompson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, examines the impact of digital technology on the publishing industry. The book grapples with broad questions of the changing nature of capitalism, the idea of information capital, an…
 
In a sneak peek of Thursday's show celebrating the high school class of 2021, we talk to Jolie Gan, who is graduating from Sir Winston Churchill High School in Calgary. She tells us about a final year like no other, marked by COVID-19, challenges of online learning, and anti-Asian hate.
 
More than 6,700 prisoners across Canada tested positive for COVID-19 as of June 9 — a rate much higher than the general population. Yet, a CBC News analysis has found that in some facilities, prisoners waited until May for their chance at a first vaccine dose. The CBC's senior data journalist, Valerie Ouellet, tells us more.…
 
Manitoba and Alberta are offering cash, scholarships, and prizes in an effort to get more people vaccinated. Will it work? We discuss incentive programs with Kelly Peters, CEO and co-founder of BEworks, a behavioural economics firm; Azim Shariff, a professor and Canada 150 Research Chair of Moral Psychology at the University of British Columbia; an…
 
I've had 18 years of formal education - why is writing so hard? Today's guests Dr Katherine Firth explains the disease's cure. The book Level Up Your Essays guides the reader through university essay writing, running through stages including essay plans, developing research strategies, writing with distinction, finishing strongly with editing, and …
 
Listen to this interview of Brooke Rollins, Assistant Professor of English at Lehigh University. We talk about lots of Greeks and about one Frenchman and (if you write) also about you. Brooke Rollins : "I think there is a way that practice in reading and writing–––that it lines up so nicely with physical training. You know, to run a marathon, you d…
 
Bob Murray, 82, lives with mild dementia in Seaforth, Ont. He welcomed news that a new drug to treat Alzheimer's has been approved in the U.S., but some scientists have argued that there's not enough proof it actually works. Murray explains why he wants Canada to also approve the treatment. Plus, we hear more about the research from Simone Fishburn…
 
The U.K. has delayed its next step in lifting COVID-19 restrictions over concerns about the spread of the delta variant. What can Canada learn from what's happening there, and what do you need to know about the variant itself? Matt Galloway talks to Dr. Deepti Gurdasani, a clinical epidemiologist and senior lecturer in machine learning at Queen Mar…
 
Constance Congdon's 2 Washington Square (Broadway Play Publishing, 2020) is a free-wheeling adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square set on the cusp of the 1960s as one era gives way to a startlingly different one. As always, Congdon's dialogue crackles with intensity and wit, echoing James' own razor-sharp observations of characters from…
 
In an “other world” composed of language—it could be a fathomless Martian well, a labyrinthine hotel, or forest—a narrative unfolds, and with it the experiences, memories, and dreams that constitute reality for Haruki Murakami’s characters and readers. Memories and dreams in turn conjure their magical counterparts—people without names or pasts, fan…
 
The G7 Summit touched on vaccines, China, accelerating climate change and life after COVID-19. To unpack what the meeting of world leaders achieved, and the work that still needs to be done, we talk to Sen. Peter Boehm, a former Canadian diplomat who has served as the personal representative to several prime ministers at G7 and G8 summits; Shuvaloy…
 
Summer is only just beginning, but farmers are worried about a year of drought. We talk to David Wiens, a dairy farmer in Manitoba and the vice-president of Dairy Farmers of Canada; Craig McLaughlin, a beef farmer in Ontario; and John Pomeroy, Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change at the University of Saskatchewan.…
 
Fredericton MP Jenica Atwin crossed the floor from the Greens caucus to the Liberals last week, saying recent party infighting played a role in her decision. Green Party Leader Annamie Paul discusses where her party goes from here, and why she feels she's being "thrown under the bus."
 
Get ideas and tips from TV host Samantha Brown for finding little corners of Europe in the New World, then hear an author's dramatic firsthand account of a near catastrophe on a cruise ship caught powerless in a freak winter storm off the coast of Norway. And a tour guide takes us to the wild, windy, and wonder-inspiring backcountry of Iceland. For…
 
In this episode, I interview Anahid Nersessian, professor of English at UCLA, about her book, Keats’s Odes: A Lover’s Discourse (University of Chicago Press, 2021). In 1819, the poet John Keats wrote six poems that would become known as the Great Odes. Some of them—“Ode to a Nightingale,” “To Autumn”—are among the most celebrated poems in the Engli…
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
In an era of rampant Islamophobia, literary representations of Muslims and anti Muslim bigotry tell us a lot about changing concepts of cultural difference. In Islamophobia and the Novel (Columbia University Press, 2018), Peter Morey, Professor at the University of Birmingham, analyzes how recent works of fiction have framed and responded to the ri…
 
What if an implant in your brain allowed you to just think of words in order to have them appear on a screen, instead of typing them out with your fingers? Scientists at Stanford University in California have achieved that in a test. It allowed a man with full-body paralysis to communicate using a neural implant, but some observers have raised ethi…
 
We hear the story of Skye, an Indigenous teen who died of a drug overdose on her 17th birthday. Before her death, Skye had been in government care in B.C. for 12 years, lived in eight different foster homes, and was the subject of three failed adoptions. A new report from British Columbia's Children and Youth Representative looks at how the foster …
 
He's the destroyer of evil, the pervasive one in whom all things lie. He is brilliant, terrifying, wild and beneficent. He is both an ascetic and a householder, both a yogi and a guru. He encompasses the masculine and the feminine, the powerful and the graceful, the Tandava and the Laasya, the darkness and the light, the divine and the human. What …
 
What does ethnography look like when presented as fiction? In this episode, we talk with Alexandros Plasatis, author of the new book Made by Sea and Wood, in Darkness (Spuyten Duyvil, 2021) a linked book of short stories based on the lives of Egyptian immigrant fishermen and other marginalized residents of a Greek town. Alexandros describes the fie…
 
Today on The Current, we're celebrating Canada's class of 2021. With graduations delayed or cancelled due to the pandemic, we're talking to graduating post-secondary students from across the country about the year they've had, and their hopes and dreams for the future.Matt Galloway talks to Sila Rogan at the University of British Columbia; Omar Elc…
 
It's been five years since B.C. declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, but a report from the First Nations Health Authority shows a 119 per cent increase in toxic drug deaths among First Nations people in 2020. The organization's acting chief medical officer Dr. Shannon McDonald joins us to discuss the role that trauma and racism pla…
 
Muslim women say they are often victims of hate speech and violence because of their appearance, and the fact that their faith is more visible. To discuss their experiences and what needs to change to make them feel safe in their communities, Matt Galloway talks to Areej Ansari, a fourth-year student at Western University in London, Ont.; Wati Rahm…
 
A female carpenter in Toronto recently faced a lawsuit after she criticized remarks about sexual harassment made on a podcast about the construction industry. We discuss sexism in the industry with Kendall Ansell, owner of Belle Construction in Vancouver; and Shawna Henderson, founder and CEO of Bfreehomes Design and Blue House Energy in Nova Scoti…
 
With graduations cancelled or scaled back for another year, we talk to Leonard Menon, who is graduating with a bachelor of music from the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, about his hopes and dreams for the future. Tune in Thursday for a full special program dedicated to the class of 2021.
 
Listen to this interview of Iain McGee, a PhD student in the Department of Religion and Theology at the University of Bristol (UK), where he also teaches Applied Linguistics. We talk about his book Understanding the Paragraph and Paragraphing (Equinox, 2018), the paragraph as a break in the text, about the paragraph as a unit of the text, and about…
 
Matthew Karp is a historian of the U.S. Civil War era and its relationship to the nineteenth-century world. He received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011 and joined the Princeton faculty in 2013. The piece we are talking about is The Politics of a Second Gilded Age, published in February 2021 in The Jacobin. His first…
 
What more can we learn about legendary American writer Elizabeth Bishop (1911-79), dubbed by Bethany Hicok “the most stunning poet of the twentieth century”, by exploring the wonderful archives of her life and work at Vassar? Why are literary archives coming back into vogue? How do new techniques in digital humanities create novel possibilities for…
 
Today we are joined by Martha Moffitt Peacock, Professor of Art History at Brigham Young University about her new book, Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives: Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age, out in 2020 with Brill. In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of imag…
 
Vancouver's Archbishop J. Michael Miller offered an apology after preliminary findings from a radar survey of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in B.C. indicated that as many as 215 children could be buried on the site. He tells us why he felt it was important to apologize, and what must happen next.…
 
Four members of a Muslim family were killed in London, Ont., in what's being investigated as an intentional and targeted attack. Aarij Anwer, imam at London Muslim Mosque, tells us how his community is coping, and we discuss Islamophobia in Canada with Mustafa Farooq, CEO of the National Council of Canadian Muslims; and Irfan Chaudhry, director of …
 
Global health experts are calling for a dramatic change in how we manufacture vaccines, to increase supply and help the world tackle this pandemic — but also plan for the next one. We hear about proposals to ramp up production, and how Canada could be part of the solution, with Dr. Prabhat Jha, an epidemiologist at the Dalla Lana School of Public H…
 
In his follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Metaphysical Club, acclaimed scholar and critic Louis Menand, Professor of English at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker, offers a new intellectual and cultural history of the postwar years. The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest se…
 
Pirates and Publishers: A Social History of Copyright in Modern China (Princeton University Press, 2019) is a detailed historical look at how copyright was negotiated and protected by authors, publishers, and the state in late imperial and modern China. In Pirates and Publishers, Fei-Hsien Wang reveals the unknown social and cultural history of cop…
 
The U.S. government says it's taking ransomware attacks as seriously as terrorism after meat plants and a major U.S. pipeline network were temporarily shuttered by hackers. But will that make it any easier to catch the perpetrators? Joe Uchill, a senior reporter with online cybersecurity publication SC Media, brings us the view from Washington. We …
 
You may remember hearing stories about goats overtaking human spaces last year, as the pandemic forced people to remain indoors. Amanda Bates, an associate professor of ocean sciences at Memorial University of Newfoundland, led an international study into how COVID-19 lockdowns have affected the natural world. She joins us to talk about the finding…
 
There's an invisible layer to the city where you live. It's meant to make your life easier, but is easy to overlook. Roman Mars of the podcast "99% Invisible" helps us examine how our urban environments are designed. And author Paul Theroux tells us how he explores getting older and the surfing culture near his home on Oahu's North Shore in his lat…
 
Paul Contino’s Catholic reading of Dostoevsky’s final masterwork, premised on the novel’s “powerful capacity to inspire readers to be better people”, follows hero Alyosha Karamazov’s spiritual maturation as a “monk in the world”, his ministry to his brothers, and his ultimate message of hope. In Dostoevsky's Incarnational Realism: Finding Christ am…
 
In recent years the phrase “revisionist history” has emerged as a label for politically-correct reexaminations of an unalterable understanding of our past. As James M. Banner, Jr. demonstrates in his book The Ever-Changing Past: Why All History Is Revisionist History (Yale UP, 2021), such a definition ignores how historical knowledge in the West ha…
 
With the Juno Awards just days away, we take a look at the Canadian music industry — one of the hardest hit by the pandemic — with Chris Frayer, artistic director of the Winnipeg Folk Festival; Amy Millan of the band Stars; and Darren "Young D" Metz and Quinton "Yung Trybez" Nyce are the hip-hop duo Snotty Nose Rez Kids.…
 
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