show episodes
 
Brains On!® is a science podcast for curious kids and adults from American Public Media. Each week, a different kid co-host joins Molly Bloom to find answers to fascinating questions about the world sent in by listeners. Like, do dogs know they’re dogs? Or, why do feet stink? Plus, we have mystery sounds for you to guess, songs for you to dance to, and lots of facts -- all checked by experts.
 
Future Ecologies is a podcast about relationships: between, within, amongst, and all around us. Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light – set to original music & immersive soundscapes, and weaving together interviews with expert knowledge holders.
 
The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Hear stories about the alien moons orbiting our Sun, of cold stars, and the future of space exploration. Every week, scientist Dr. Carrie Nugent chats about an amazing part of our universe with an expert guest. Spacepod is the podcast that gives you an inside look into space exploration. Learn more: http://listentospacepod.com
 
The Science Revolution is about science that matters and brings revolutionary ways of thinking about science. We cover the science important to the world as well as to our everyday lives. You will learn how an entire spectrum of scientific disciplines meaningfully impacts your life and our world. From climate change to neuroscience to physics and medicine - and sometimes the politics & religion that tie them to us all - this podcast will entertain and deeply inform you. Science comes alive i ...
 
This is The Supermassive Podcast from the Royal Astronomical Society. Every month, science journalist Izzie Clarke and astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst take you through the universe with the latest research, history from the society’s archives and astronomy you can do from your own home. You can send your questions to the team via podcast@ras.ac.uk or tweet @RoyalAstroSoc using #RASSupermassive The Supermassive Podcast is a Boffin Media Production by Izzie Clarke and Richard Hollingham.
 
Welcome to Real Science Radio with co-hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams who discuss the latest in science to debunk evolution and to show the evidence for the creator God including from biology, geology, astronomy, and physics. (For example, mutations will give you bad legs long before you'd get good wings.) Not only do we get to debate Darwinists and atheists like Lawrence Krauss, AronRa, and Eugenie Scott, and easily take potshots from popular evolutionists like PZ Myers, Phil Plait, and ...
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
Unexplainable is a science show about everything we don’t know. Host Noam Hassenfeld is joined by an array of experts and Vox reporters each week to look at the most fascinating unanswered questions in science and the mind-bending ways scientists are trying to answer them. New episodes drop every Wednesday starting March 10. From Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
Every weekday, TED Talks Daily brings you the latest talks in audio. Join host and journalist Elise Hu for thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable — from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between — given by the world's leading thinkers and creators. With TED Talks Daily, find some space in your day to change your perspectives, ignite your curiosity, and learn something new.
 
A bi-monthly non-partisan podcast brought to you by Geopolitical Futures, an online publication founded by internationally recognized geopolitical forecaster George Friedman. Geopolitical Futures tells you what matters in international affairs and what doesn’t. Go to https://geopoliticalfutures.com/podcast for details.
 
Hi kids, if you think that animals are amazing, this is the show for you! Join host Earth Ranger Emma as she travels the world to discover the wildest animal facts out there and solve nature’s biggest mysteries. With top ten countdowns, an animal guessing game, conservation conversations, and epic animal showdowns, this is a journey you won’t want to miss! To learn more, visit earthrangers.com/podcast
 
The National Air and Space Museum contains the largest and most significant collection of air- and spacecraft in the world. Behind those amazing machines are thousands of stories of human achievement, failure, and perseverance. Join Emily, Matt, and Nick as they demystify one of the world’s most visited museums and explore why people are so fascinated with stories of exploration, innovation, and discovery.
 
You see it every day. It’s the subject of poetry, literature, art and film. It can inspire spiritual experiences, and it can destroy everything you have ever worked for. It is the weather, and no one knows it better than we do. Join us every week for the agony and the ecstasy of the one story that the entire world participates in and the science behind it. From the people behind The Weather Channel TV network.
 
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Revealing more about microbiologists, the work they do, and what makes them tick. We ask them what they're up to now and what's next? How is the science moving forward to solve some of the intractable problems of our times? What keeps them going in a tough, competitive field? What do they see for the future of research, education, and training? We hope to show you a glimpse of what scientists are really like and what's going on in cutting-edge research today.
 
Emergence Magazine is an online publication with annual print edition exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Our podcast features exclusive interviews, narrated essays, stories and more. During this pandemic, we are publishing new content that explores the deeper themes and questions emerging at this t ...
 
19 years on Australian Public Radio (as StarStuff), 4 years of podcasting and counting. We have a lot of content to share with you. Recognized worldwide by our listeners and industry experts as one of the best and most thoroughly researched programs on Astronomy, Technology, Space, and Science News. Keep up-to-date and learn something new with every episode. 3 new episodes per week. Show your support for SpaceTime, help us reach our goals with access to commercial free episodes and bonuses v ...
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (Planetary Science Institute), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported thru patreon.com/AstronomyCast.
 
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show series
 
SpaceTime with Stuart Gary Series 24 Episode 50 *Climate Change has shifted the axis of the Earth A new study claims glacial melting due to global warming was likely the cause of a shift in the movement of the Earth’s poles that occurred in the 1990s. *What may be the nearest black hole to Earth Astronomers have discovered what may be the nearest b…
 
Guest: Neil Sahota Introduction: When we think about artificial intelligence, or A.I., what comes to mind for many folks are robots or even IBM’s Watson, which went head to head with some of Jeopardy’s greatest contestants on television among other things.. But what might not come to mind is how this branch of science and technology is being used t…
 
Rich Stone, former international news editor at Science and current senior science editor at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Tangled Bank Studios, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about concerning levels of fission reactions deep in an inaccessible area of the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Though nothing is likely to come of it …
 
In this week's questions show, I explain whether or not gravity is infinite, will we need to cure cancer to go to space? Will SpaceX help Artemis' chances for landing humans on Mars in 2024, and more... 00:00 Start 00:54 Is gravity infinite? 02:33 How deep does lunar regolith go? 04:09 Could nearby star systems contain planets that we don't know ab…
 
My guest is Dr. Jessie Christiansen, an astrophysicist with NASA's Exoplanet Science Institute. Jessie will give us an update on TESS and the 2,200 planets it's discovered so far. http://web.ipac.caltech.edu/staff/christia/ 🚀 OUR WEBSITE: ════════════════════════════════════ https://www.universetoday.com/ 🚀 PODCAST LINKS: ══════════════════════════…
 
My guest is Dr. Rebecca K. Leane, an astroparticle physicist with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The work involves innovative ways to detect dark matter. http://rebeccaleane.com/ 🚀 OUR WEBSITE: ════════════════════════════════════ https://www.universetoday.com/ 🚀 PODCAST LINKS: ════════════════════════════════════ RSS: https://universeto…
 
Children of immigrants in the US often experience a unique kind of guilt, brought on by the pressures of navigating different cultures, living up to their parents' expectations and taking on extra family responsibilities. Mental health advocate Sahaj Kaur Kohli offers helpful strategies for dealing with these difficult feelings -- starting with def…
 
When the Guardian began reporting on the climate crisis 70 years ago, people were worried that warmer temperatures would make it harder to complain about the weather. Today it is the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced. In the second special episode marking 200 years of the Guardian, Phoebe Weston is joined by Jonathan Watts, Prof Naomi Oresk…
 
Learn about the treadmill’s torture device origins. Then, author Melanie Peffer explains why biology is everywhere. Treadmills were originally torture devices by Steffie Drucker Protin, C., & Stuart, M. (2017, April 13). Treadmills were originally used as torture devices for prisoners. Business Insider; Business Insider. https://www.businessinsider…
 
In episode 6 of our astronaut selection series, ESA Senior Flight Surgeon Sergi Vaquer Araho talks us through his role in taking care of ESA astronauts before, during and after spaceflight. Sergi is a medical doctor and part of ESA's space medicine team. He shares how he came to be involved with ESA through the Fly Your Thesis! programme that offer…
 
The earliest evidence of deliberate human burial in Africa, and a metal-free rechargeable battery. Listen to our mini-series ‘Stick to the Science’: when science gets political and vote for the show in this year’s Webby Awards. In this episode: 00:44 Human burial practices in Stone Age Africa The discovery of the burial site of a young child in a K…
 
If you're a frequent flier, you're also a major polluter. What if there was a way to travel the world with less impact on the environment? In this quick, exciting talk, aviation entrepreneur and TED Fellow Cory Combs lays out how electric aircraft could make flying cleaner, quieter and more affordable -- and shares his work on Electric EEL, the lar…
 
Jim Corbett was not your typical rancher. Over the course of decades roaming the borderlands of the desert southwest, he developed a practice that he referred to as 'goatwalking' - a form of prophetic wandering and desert survival based on goat-human symbiosis. For Jim, 'goatwalking' provided both physical and spiritual sustenance, and allowed him …
 
Today’s episode is about DREAMS! Not your hopes and dreams, but the kind you have when you’re fast asleep. Why do you have dreams? What they actually mean? And what’s going on inside your brain as you dream?! Don’t sleep on this one! What did we learn this week? 7:01 When Does Cognitive Empathy Develop in Humans? 13:25 Our Ancestors Adapted So That…
 
For decades, scientists thought that placebos only worked if patients didn’t know they were taking them. Not anymore: You can give patients placebos, tell them they’re on sugar pills, and they still might feel better. No one is sure how this works, but it raises a question: Should doctors embrace placebos in mainstream medicine? For more, go to htt…
 
Learn about a gender gap in 8-year-olds; how speaking another language can change you; and a monumental dino discovery. Learn about how kids as young as 8 show a gender gap when it comes to negotiating; how speaking another language can change your personality; and what paleontologists can learn from a momentous new discovery of fossilized dinosaur…
 
On 22 June 1918, the Manchester Guardian reported that a flu epidemic was moving through the British Isles. It was noted to be ‘by any means a common form of influenza’. Eventually, it took the lives of more than 50 million people around the world. In a special episode to mark the Guardian’s 200th anniversary, Nicola Davis looks back on the 1918 fl…
 
Australia's government is famous for its lack of interest in climate change. Despite increasing problems from bushfires and droughts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his Liberal-led coalition government continue to promote coal-mining and dodge efforts to reduce the country's carbon emissions. It's all the more extraordinary then that one Austral…
 
Fungus deserves a party because it’s everywhere and super important to life on this planet. The kingdom of fungus includes mushrooms and molds, but also yeasts, like the kinds that help make bread. So today, we’re embracing the ick, we’re snuggling up to the slimy, we’re making friends with mold and mushrooms… It’s a full on Fung-o-Rama! We'll lear…
 
In this in-depth interview, Dr. Suzanne Simard—the renowned scientist who discovered the “wood-wide web”—speaks about mother trees, kin recognition, and how to heal our separation from the living world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesBy Emergence Magazine
 
Captain Sig Hansen from “Deadliest Catch” discusses the surprising ways the coronavirus pandemic made the world’s most dangerous job even harder. Then, you’ll learn about our moon’s comet-like tail that collides with Earth every month. Learn more about Deadliest Catch, Tuesdays at 8 PM ET/PT on Discovery Official website https://www.discovery.com/s…
 
In this episode, part thirty-six of the multi-part BLUEprint series, we outline the key state of the ocean and ocean science take-aways from the recently published 2nd United Nations World Ocean Assessment, a report that looks at the social, environmental, demographic and economic trends, as well as a review of the integrated sustainable management…
 
Astronomy Cast Ep. 603: New Colors of the Radio Spectrum by Fraser Cain & Dr. Pamela Gay Last week we talked about how new telescopes and techniques are allowing astronomers to explore the shortest wavelengths of light. This week we go to the other end of the electromagnetic spectrum and explore the longer radio waves which are now accessible to as…
 
What does gender equality have to do with climate change? A lot more than you might think. Empowering women and girls around the world is one of the most important ways to combat carbon pollution and is projected to reduce CO2-equivalent gases by a total of 80 billion tons. Entrepreneur, scientist and TED Fellow Rumaitha Al Busaidi looks at why wom…
 
The world has gone through a tough time with the COVID-19 pandemic. Every catastrophic event is unique, but there are certain commonalities to how such crises play out in our modern interconnected world. Historian Niall Ferguson wrote a book from a couple of years ago, The Square and the Tower, that considered how an interplay between networks and …
 
The Astronomy, Technology and Space Science News Podcast. SpaceTime with Stuart Gary Series 24 Episode 49 *A record-breaking flare from Sun's nearest stellar neighbour Astronomers have detected one of the most violent stellar flares ever recorded in the galaxy exploding out of Proxima Centauri the nearest star system to the Sun. *More chopper fligh…
 
Evo Morales, Bolivia's first Indigenous president, won reelection three times on a leftist platform championing Indigenous rights, anti-imperialism, and Bolivian control over the country's natural gas reserves. In Bolivia in the Age of Gas (Duke UP, 2020), Bret Gustafson explores how the struggle over natural gas has reshaped Bolivia, along with th…
 
Dip below the ocean’s surface and you are soon confronted by forms of life that could not seem more foreign to our own: sea sponges, soft corals, and serpulid worms, whose rooted bodies, intricate geometry, and flower-like appendages are more reminiscent of plant life or even architecture than anything recognizably animal. Yet these creatures are o…
 
Learn about a 5-step process for finding work-life balance; photosynthetic bacteria that have never seen the sun; and why researchers build a digital model of the ancient Greek Antikythera mechanism: the first known analog computer. A 5-step process for hitting the moving target of work-life balance by Kelsey Donk Lufkin, B. (2021). Why it’s wrong …
 
He's a savant. Of course we're not using the standard deficient dictionary definition of savant but an expanded and more accurate one as at rsr.org/definitions. Real Science Radio hosts Bob Enyart and Fred Williams discuss various famed savants and then expand the discussion to include people like Annie Oakley, Roger Federer, and the NBA's greatest…
 
Mars Milestones, Whey To Go, Whale Speak, Malaria Success, Bacterial Biofilms, Anti-Stars?, COVID Update, Sponge Tracks, Fruit Fly Marathoners, Antibiotic Time Bomb, New Nomenclature, Drug-Finding Tool, Lost Identity, And Much More... The post 28 April, 2021 – Episode 822 – This Show is Totally Reasonable appeared first on This Week in Science - Th…
 
For more than a century, public health researchers have demonstrated how poverty and discrimination drive disease and the coronavirus pandemic has only reinforced this. In a Coronapod special, Nature reporter Amy Maxmen takes us with her through eight months of reporting in the San Joaquin valley, a part of rural California where COVID's unequal to…
 
Can viruses live in space? That’s what our listener Julian wants to know. It turns out, that’s a question that scientists are asking, too! Kathryn Bywaters is one of the scientists starting the search for viruses in space. She believes that finding viruses might be the easiest way to discover life on other planets. But first, we have to learn more …
 
Crocodiles are often referred to as “living fossils”, but if we compare modern and ancient species, does that label hold up? What different kind of morphologies (shapes) did past crocs have and how did they live? How quickly did this past diversity arise and why are we left with so few species today? What’s to stop them from diversifying again? In …
 
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