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O programa Quarentena Climática pretende acompanhar a actual crise do coronavírus e relacionar esta e a crise económica com a crise climática que continua a agravar-se no actual contexto. Com a máxima regularidade possível divulgaremos um podcast, vídeo e textos que acompanham a actual situação e ajudam a olhar para o futuro com mais informação e a contínua necessidade de acção. Fiquem atentos!
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The Argentina Project Podcast is led by host Benjamin Gedan, the Latin American Program’s Deputy Director and former South America Director on the National Security Council at the White House. Each episode features dialogue and exchange with leading experts on Argentine affairs, posing pivotal questions while analyzing the country’s present and future.
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In 1492, Spain's Alhambra Decree forced Jews to convert to Christianity or face expulsion, leading many to become conversos. Portugal issued a similar edict in 1496. Driven by a desire for religious homogeneity, these measures led to persistent discrimination based on Jewish ancestry. How did this new group of New Christians defend their interests …
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In today's political discussions, the endorsement of free trade is commonly linked with perspectives that lean toward the right side of the spectrum. However, it's crucial to recognize that the roots of free trade and classical liberalism extend beyond contemporary left-right divides. As a result, the promotion of free trade has profoundly impacted…
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Sci-fi builds alternative realities from current science, spanning space travel, AI, genetics, and quantum mechanics. Its appeal lies not only in scientific accuracy but also in the constraints it imposes on characters within these worlds. Audiences are drawn to the social questions it poses, exploring diverse societies, cultures, and interpersonal…
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The Great Enrichment stands as one of humanity's pivotal moments, igniting in Europe during the 17th to 19th centuries, prompting countless attempts to decipher its origins. Today, Dr. Salter will delve into his latest collaborative work with Professor Andrew Young, titled "The Medieval Constitution of Liberty: Political Foundations of Liberalism i…
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En este episodio del podcast del Proyecto Argentina del Wilson Center, Alejo Czerwonko, director general y director de inversiones para mercados emergentes de las Américas en UBS, platica con Diana Mondino, asesora económica senior del candidato presidencial argrentino Javier Milei, sobre la plataforma económica de Milei y sus perspectivas de cara …
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In this episode of the Wilson Center’s Argentina Project podcast, Benjamin Gedan speaks with Francisco de Santibañes, a Wilson Center global fellow and vice president of the Consejo Argentino para las Relaciones Internacionales, about the implications of Argentina’s October election on the nation’s foreign policy, including its relationships with t…
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From the 11th to 14th centuries, the Roman Catholic Church was Europe’s largest and most organized institution. Unlike any other entity at the time, it had the capacity to tax, create law and administer justice. Secular authorities had to grapple with it. They competed and allied with it. But most importantly, they emulated it. Today we will be tal…
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"Too much money spent chasing too few goods" is the preferred explanation that most people think about when discussing the causes of inflation. But how generally applicable is said argument to our modern economy? Today we will be talking with Dr. John Cochrane, who will speak about his most recent book, The Fiscal Theory of the Price Level, where h…
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Argentine President Alberto Fernández took office in December 2019. Last week, more than three years later, he made it to the White House. In this episode of the Wilson Center’s Argentina Project podcast, Benjamin Gedan speaks with Rafael Mathus Ruiz, the U.S. correspondent for Argentina’s La Nación, about the objectives and outcomes of Fernández’s…
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We tend to think of political borders as exogenous artifacts that are imposed in a top-down manner by governments with imperial ambitions. And while this is true in some cases, there is a more significant case to be made for the alternative, where borders and jurisdictions are endogenous to the populations that draw them. A country's size and front…
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Before the 13th Century, the low countries were a small region at the fringe of Europe. Yet, by the 17th Century, the Netherlands had transformed into the most prosperous society in the world. How did such transformation occur? Today we will be joined by Professors Praak and van Zanden, who will discuss their most recent book "Pioneers of Capitalis…
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En este episodio, Patricia I. Vásquez, miembro global del Programa Latinoamericano del Wilson Center, platica con Daniel Chávez Diaz, CEO de Eramine, sobre las características innovadoras de un proyecto de litio que la empresa desarrolla actualmente en la provincia de Salta y sobre los riesgos de invertir en un país de alta volatilidad económica y …
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As its name implies, the Renaissance is often thought of as a turning point in human history. Art is its most celebrated, long-lasting legacy. And the romanticized perception of the artist as a genius is its byproduct. But how exactly did artists become artists? Who commissioned their work? How could the patrons oversee the quality of the work they…
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Nigeria is Africa’s largest state by population size and by nominal GDP. It is a multiethnic state where more than 250 minorities coexist. Political conflict due to geographic, religious, and cultural differences has been a common theme since its independence from Britain in 1960. How can a large and diverse state like Nigeria be fully integrated i…
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Up until the 18th century, China was the world’s hegemon. So how did it get there in the first place? And why did the Empire collapse abruptly in the 20th century? Today, Yuhua Wang will talk to us about his most recent book, where he argues the Chinese state experienced a gradual decline in its state capacity caused by a sovereign’s dilemma, where…
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En este episodio, Beatriz García Nice platicó con Fernando Straface, Secretario General y de Relaciones Internacionales de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires sobre la reciente cumbre del C40 en dicha ciudad y donde se firmó el Pacto de Buenos Aires. También discutieron el rol de la Argentina en la actual convergencia internacional y como Argentina puede ser…
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En este episodio, Beatriz García Nice platica con el Secretario de Industria y Desarrollo Productivo del Ministerio de Economía de Argentina, José Ignacio (Vasco) de Mendiguren, sobre la actualización de la matriz productiva argentina en la coyuntura actual con la guerra en Ucrania, la transformación energética que vive el país y las oportunidades …
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Narrow banks are depository institutions that focus on investing in federal reserve deposits and pass on most of the interest accrued to their respective depositors. Dr. James McAndrews, CEO of TNB USA Inc., will help us unravel what role narrow banking can play in modern financial systems.By Penn Initiative for the Study of Markets
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En este episodio, Patricia I. Vásquez, miembro global del Programa Latinoamericano, plática con María Laura Castillo Díaz, coordinadora del Programa Altoandinos, en la Fundación Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, sobre la falta de suficientes datos científicos para poder entender la huella ambiental que genera el desarrollo del litio en los salares arg…
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Adam Smith is widely acknowledged as the father of economics. Yet, in his own time, he was mostly known for his moral and jural philosophy work. So what do we set to gain by directly reading him today? Today we are joined by Maria Pia Paganelli, who will act as our guide into Adam Smith's work and the importance of the History of Economic Thought a…
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Cash transfers have become a much-discussed policy tool. But studying the impact of sudden wealth shocks remains controversial. Martínez-Marquina joins us to discuss his recent research on an interesting setting that may help us shed light on the discussion: the effect of winning the lottery in Spanish towns since the 1900s.…
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In this episode, host Benjamin Gedan speaks with Andrés Borenstein, the chief economist at Econoviews and the host of the podcast, “La economía en tres minutos,” about Argentina’s fragile economic condition and whether the country’s latest finance minister is solving long-term problems or simply postponing the next crisis.…
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To measure is to know. That has been science's dictum since the industrial revolution. But what happens when our measurement estimates are wrong? Today we will be joined by Timothy Guinnane. He will talk to us about how inaccurate the world's historical population estimates are and the general implications for economics, demography, and social scie…
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What makes people move away from their places of origin, and what are the consequences? Economic concerns matter, of course, but cultural attitudes that select people to migrate matter too. Today we will be joined by Anne Beck Sofie Knudsen, who will talk to us about Scandinavian migration to America in the 19th century…
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The history of money is the history of human exchange. We may now take for granted the existence of national monies, but our current monetary system anchored around central banks is a product of 20th-century political economy developments. Today we will be joined by Bryan Cutsinger, who will discuss his research on the history of money provision in…
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En este episodio, Beatriz García Nice, coordinadora del Programa Latinoamericano, plática con Nicolás Acero, director de la Consultora Economía y Energía, sobre el déficit energético que vive Argentina durante el invierno austral, la falta de infraestructura para cubrir la demanda actual y los retos que el país enfrenta para incentivar una inversió…
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Global concerns about comparative economic development, growth, and inequality cannot be adequately assessed without attending to the core foundations that have shaped human history. Today, Oded Galor joins us to discuss his most recent book on this topic: The Journey of Humanity. We talk about why a unified approach to economic growth is needed, w…
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Culture and tradition are important determinants of human behavior that are usually perceived to be outside the proper scope of economics. Today, Nathan Nunn will join us to discuss his most recent paper delivered during the 2022 AEA Distinguished Lecture. We talk about why culture matters, how beliefs are formed, and when relying on tradition may …
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Most recent demographic projections suggest humanity will reach its population peak by the end of the century. What lies ahead is uncertain as it will be a first for our world. Today, Professor Jesús Fernández-Villaverde joins us to discuss the challenges and the opportunities that may come with the end of the world's demographic transition.…
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Good managerial practices may help nations and firms increase productivity by rearranging existing resources into more efficient production processes. On the contrary, mismanagement---due to rent-seeking or out of pure neglect---can squander any growth opportunity. Understanding what good management entails and how can firms and countries achieve i…
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Innovation is heralded as an essential trait of success in modern firms and societies alike. Entrepreneurs are hailed as our modern-day heroes, persons with creativity and heightened perceptiveness committed to finding better and more efficient ways of creating value. But what are the social conditions necessary to foster people like that? What are…
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Human societies are inherently prone to recurring shocks that constantly disrupt their organization. How can we effectively manage these shocks? How can we build better societal mechanisms to cope better and assure us a return to normalcy? Today Markus will help us understand the severity of the issue.…
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Southeast Asia has historically been the land of spices and riches to Westerners. To Asians, it was the buffer zone of conflict where Indian Buddhism and Chinese Confucianism collided. A geographical area where highlands and rain forest create the ideal spot for huge, diverse societies to emerge. Today, Jessica will talk to us about how these facto…
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Out of World War II, a socialist state was born under the leadership of Joseph Tito that united many of the several ethnicities into one polity: Yugoslavia. It has been described as an alternative type of socialism deviating from a firm conception of central planning. Today Leonard Kukić will talk to us about how successful the experiment was in ec…
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In 17th century China, the Qing regime persecuted individuals for speech crimes against the state through literary inquisitions. The persecution targeted intellectuals, diminishing their reputation. It also affected the operation of charitable organizations. Through time, they amplified distrust of others and increased apathy towards local governan…
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The process of establishing a functional State is neither simple nor easy. Historical episodes may highlight the violent beginnings of current states, but they also help us recognize the inherent complexities in jumpstarting one. The building of the Mexican State was achieved by contingencies that arose out of the Conquest, by which Spanish and Nat…
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The figure of the engineer as an embodiment of what’s productive and wealth-enhancing is a well-known story. But how much of the story is true and how much is a myth? Are the engineers really such a powerful force conducive to long-term development? Felipe will talk about how the engineer has impacted economic growth of our societies.…
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Sumptuary Laws were regulations that aimed to restrict excessiveness in the consumption of certain personal items of daily life, especially in food and clothes. . While these types of laws had existed in Europe since at least the Greeks their presence spiked in the late middle ages. Yet, by the 19th century, they had disappeared. What explains thei…
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Guest host Nicolás Saldías, a Latin America analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit, sits down with Esteban Paulón, executive director of Argentina’s Instituto de Políticas Públicas LGBT+, to discuss Argentina’s recently approved transgender labor law and the impacts of COVID-19 on Latin America’s LGBTQ+ community.…
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In part one of this special conversation, former U.S. Ambassador to Argentina Noah Mamet hosts his successor, Edward Prado, who served as ambassador in Buenos Aires until this past January, to discuss their experiences representing very different U.S. presidents and interacting with very different Argentine governments.…
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