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Nature Podcast

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Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
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Don't Panic Geocast

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Don't Panic Geocast

John Leeman and Shannon Dulin

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John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
Third Pod from the Sun is back, and we’re going weekly! We’re breaking things up into six-week mini-series and our first series is all about the true, personal stories from scientists, for everyone. Join us as we combat misconceptions about sharks, learn how to lasso lizards, hear from a Martian here on Earth, spark science joy via TikTok, journey to Antarctica, and fight over food with some capuchins!
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
The Nature Medicine Podcast reports on cutting-edge news in biomedical research from around the globe. The program features interviews with experts and a review of the advances that scientists hope to translate from bench to bedside. Tune into the podcast to learn about breakthroughs and policy developments in medical research.
 
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Seismic Soundoff

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Seismic Soundoff

Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG)

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In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
Down to Earth with Terry Virts is a podcast about what matters on planet Earth. It is hosted by former NASA astronaut, author, and filmmaker Terry Virts, and features his conversations with interesting guests from diverse backgrounds, talking about science, entrepreneurship, climate, TV and Film, politics, sports, and of course, space. Terry will bring his “cosmic perspective” to engage with each guest, and their conversations will be flexible to cover any topic that is important to us human ...
 
This podcast series was put together by data science intern Leo Elworth to spread knowledge on these hot topics to the broader community. As the buzz around data science and machine learning continues to grow, more and more people are developing a curiosity for these topics, as well as their applications to the specific field of oil and gas. Interviews with expert data scientists and geologists serve to highlight innovative problems and share entertaining anecdotes. Podcast editing assistanc ...
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
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show series
 
When Christa Peters-Lidard cold-called the head of NASA’s hydrology lab as an undergrad, she wasn’t thinking she’d eventually land that very position. Now as the Acting Director for Sciences and Exploration at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Christa oversees several critical programs – either orbiting, like the James Webb Telescope, or currentl…
 
Boris Gurevich provides an insider's perspective on the value of expanding your knowledge and awareness of the wide-ranging discipline of geophysics.Boris currently serves as Chair of the Distinguished Lecture Committee at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. In this conversation with host Andrew Geary, Boris shares the benefits and primary fu…
 
Though excavation is pretty much synonymous with archaeological fieldwork in the popular and professional imagination, the bulk of the work that we, as archaeologists, do is survey. In the decades that Chris and Paul have been doing archaeological survey we’ve seen great improvements in how they can be planned and carried out, in large part do to t…
 
In this episode: 00:47 Chemical analysis of ancient embalming materials Mummification was a significant part of ancient Egyptian culture but, despite decades of research, much is unknown about the substances and methods used during the process. Now a team have analysed the contents of ceramic vessels uncovered in an embalming workshop that dates ba…
 
A new generation of anti-obesity medications are displaying striking results: drastically diminishing weight, without the serious side effects of previous medications. These drugs have raised hopes the weight can be pharmacologically altered in a safe way, but some researchers are concerned about the drugs' high cost, and that these medications cou…
 
This week John and Shannon discuss some mysterious rocks whose extraterrestrial origin is still debated and if growing a beard is a good defense against a punch. Arstechnica article on Hypatia Stone Fun Paper Friday Beseris, E. A., S. E. Naleway, and D. R. Carrier. "Impact protection potential of mammalian hair: Testing the pugilism hypothesis for …
 
As the Scientific Visualization lead for NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Mark SubbaRao oversees the translation of NASA science into images and movies. For Mark, science visualization is a key communication tool that allows the public to interact and explore the various scientific discoveries happening at NASA and beyond. He sits down with us a…
 
00:45 The role of serine in diabetic neuropathy Nerve damage is a common complication of diabetes, and can even lead to limb amputation. Thus far, the only way for people to slow its onset is by managing their diet and lifestyle. Now though, research in mice shows how the amino acid serine may be key to this nerve damage, suggesting a potential rol…
 
New York City is a sprawling metropolis, but the design of the city is heavily influenced by the geology of this tortured patch of rock. This week we talk about it and what rocks you'll see as you stroll the city streets. Manhattan Schist Inwood Marble Fordham Gneiss Fun Paper Friday Cameras left behind by explorers over 80 years ago found and may …
 
As the Deputy Program Manager for NASA’s Radioisotope Power Systems Program at Glenn Research Center, Concha Reid leads a team overseeing and monitoring devices that heat and give power to NASA space projects, such as the recent Orion spacecraft for Artemis 1. She sits down with us to talk about growing up in the Virgin Islands and how that inspire…
 
We start today's show with a discussion about the current uses to Twitter and Mastodon after Elon Musk's takeover. For the last two segments, however, we talk about a novel way photogrammetry is being used on an excavation in Bulgaria. Want to see the excavation at any level? This will do it! Transcripts For rough transcripts of this episode go to …
 
The seismic data set is a fundamental requirement for producing oil and gas fields. Reservoir modeling utilizing seismic interpretations drove insights into reservoir quality and performance, helping to understand the communication between reservoir units and wells, particularly in fields with many wells. Over time, technological advancements led t…
 
In this episode: 00:45 Laser-guided lightning Scientists have shown that a specially designed laser can divert the course of lightning strikes in a real-world setting. The team fired the laser into the sky above a communications tower high in the Swiss Alps and altered the course of four strikes. In future they hope that this kind of system could b…
 
Shannon's Resolutions Streamline Digital Workflows Read a lot! (and use goodreads) Take a sabbatical John's Resolutions Read 24 Books Cut carbs and meal prep lunch Take quarterly vacations Systemize, delegate, react Fun Paper Friday Do you have a funny walk? It could be healthy! Gaesser, Glenn A., David C. Poole, and Siddhartha S. Angadi. "Quantify…
 
Being a Hydrologist was never on Matthew Rodell’s radar, let alone working for NASA. But he always trusted the path ahead. Now as their Deputy Director of Earth Sciences for Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Geophysics (HGB) at Goddard Space Flight Center, he walks us through the important data being collected via remote sensing, being one of the first h…
 
Terry talks to Ryan Clancy from No Labels “Ryan Clancy, chief strategist for No Labels, talks about some unique and innovative ways to save our political system from the extreme left and right, and what might be done to give Americans a viable, centrist candidate in the 2024 presidential election without starting a completely new third party." http…
 
Leo Eisner discusses his Honorary Lecture, "Mapping pore pressure with beach balls."The stress field of the Earth's crust has been studied for many decades as a part of seismology and geomechanics. Traditional stress inversion methods utilize focal mechanisms of earthquakes as this is typically the only data available at a regional scale and lower …
 
In this episode of the Nature Podcast, we catch up on some science stories from the holiday period by diving into the Nature Briefing. We’ll hear: how Brazil’s President Lula has started to make good on his pro-environment promises; a new theory for why giant ichthyosaurs congregated in one place; how glass frogs hide their blood; about a new statu…
 
In this episode, reporter Miryam Naddaf joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2023. We'll hear about vaccines, multiple Moon missions and new therapeutics, to name but a few. News: the science events to look out for in 2023 Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis fr…
 
Dorian Janney is a science communicator for NASA asking the big question: how do we make science accessible? Sparked into Earth Space Science through her son’s curiosity with space, we talk to Dorian on how her journey as an educator and life-long learner led to working on NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission as a Senior Outreach Special…
 
Serguei Goussev discusses his new book, Gravity & Magnetic Encyclopedic Dictionary.This book contains more than 3,200 entries and presents a terminology-guided summary of the gravity and magnetic theory, measuring instruments, methods of data acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation for geophysical studies of the Earth and other planet…
 
It's a news episode! We found three articles that all happen to deal with archaeological metallurgy. From sourcing to melting with a laser, there's a lot you can tell about an object based on what it's metals are either composed of or are sourced from. Transcripts For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/archaeotech/19…
 
Chris Justice is a geographer and professor at the University of Maryland whose research on land use changes and global agriculture has taken him around the world. His research has had a hand in a variety of NASA programs, including the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Mission to Planet Earth, and the creation of the Global Inventory Mod…
 
In this episode: 00:53 How virtual meetings can limit creative ideas In April, we heard how a team investigated whether switching from face-to-face to virtual meetings came at a cost to creativity. They showed that people meeting virtually produced fewer creative ideas than those working face-to-face, and suggest that when it comes to idea generati…
 
Shannon went to a workshop on determining the provenance of sediments using heavy elements, optical microscopes, and Raman spectra! Raman Spectroscopy Fun Paper Friday Do dogs lie when they mark? McGuire, B., et al. "Urine marking in male domestic dogs: honest or dishonest?." Journal of Zoology 306.3 (2018): 163-170. Contact us: Show Support us on …
 
What do folks who fight food insecurity with satellites, do outreach about Pluto, and map out the Earth's gravitational fields have in common? How about a common thread between those who study light pollution, create science visualizations, and direct exploration? They all work for NASA! Join us for our final series of season one as we talk with NA…
 
Paul worked with Marco Wolf on his travels to Ur this past fall of 2022. Marco is interested in all things digital and they talked a lot about some of the techniques they were both using on their projects. On this episode they discuss Marco’s data management methods, magnetometry work, and more. Transcripts For rough transcripts of this episode go …
 
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