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Nature Podcast

51
Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
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Don't Panic Geocast

1
Don't Panic Geocast

John Leeman and Shannon Dulin

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John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
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Seismic Soundoff

1
Seismic Soundoff

Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG)

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In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
Toby decides to give her journal a break and talk about her life and experiences to every amazing person that's listening. I'll love to hear your unique experiences, thoughts and opinions. Please leave me a voice message or comments after listening. I'm on Twitter and Instagram as Toby Ude-Akpeh. Also contact me via email at tobyudeakpeh@gmail.com You can support me by tipping me @ Useshukran https://useshukran.com/cr/my%20name%20is%20toby Patreon https://www.patreon.com/MyNameIsToby
 
The Nature Medicine Podcast reports on cutting-edge news in biomedical research from around the globe. The program features interviews with experts and a review of the advances that scientists hope to translate from bench to bedside. Tune into the podcast to learn about breakthroughs and policy developments in medical research.
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
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Bill Harbert highlights his SEG course, "Petrophysics and Geophysics Relevant to CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery."In this forward-looking conversation, Bill shares why it's the right time to discuss enhanced oil recovery (EOR), the geophysical method that will have the greatest impact on EOR, one of the biggest pitfalls when geophysical methods are appli…
 
Hundreds of scientists have responded to a survey asking about harassment and abuse during the pandemic. The results paint a picture which is as concerning as it is shocking. In this episode of Coronapod we discuss the kinds of abuse scientists are facing, try to pick apart where it is comes from and ask what can be done about it? News Feature: ‘I …
 
Trovants are a mysterious rock formation and we try to understand them this week! Science Alert Article When on Earth Article Wikipedia Article Geology In Article Fun Paper Friday Tired of zoom meetings? Let's read a paper about them! Shockley, Kristen M., et al. "The fatiguing effects of camera use in virtual meetings: A within-person field experi…
 
Archaeologists have been using digital technologies to augment traditional field archaeology for several decades (GPS and mapping mostly). However, as modern technologies continue to enter the archaeological space, most researchers are using these techniques almost as a second thought. The authors of this case study argue for development of a digit…
 
Henning Hoeber discusses a new tool for rock physics in his recent paper published in September's The Leading Edge.In this episode, Henning explains the theory of omitted variable bias (OVB) and its connection to rock physics, why OVB hasn't appeared before in the geoscience literature, how OVB helps geophysicists understand biases in models, the r…
 
The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria. In this episode: 00:54 The neuronal basis for acupuncture’s effect on inflammation In mice, electroacupuncture has been shown to reduce inflammation, but only when certain points on the body are stimulated. Why this is has puzzled scientists, but now, …
 
We’ve all heard stories about fantastical creatures that people swear they’ve seen and have evidence of but can never be confirmed. Think Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster. Mermaids or the Kraken. While there’s no evidence backing the existence of these creatures, either in present day or at any point in the past, there must be a reason why such leg…
 
New data suggests that inexpensive, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters can effectively scrub SARS-CoV-2 particles from the air in hospital COVID wards. The result validates previous studies carried out in controlled conditions. Currently, HEPA filters are not routinely used in hospital settings, but researchers suggest they could could …
 
Andy Elwood-Madden X-Ray Diffraction Reynolds Cup Fun Paper Friday How many legs does it take to freak you out? Vetter, Richard S. "Arachnophobic entomologists: when two more legs makes a big difference." American Entomologist 59.3 (2013): 168-175. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeocast.com SWUNG Slack @dontpanicgeo show@dontp…
 
AI weather forecasters, mapping the human brain and the 2021 science Nobel prizes. In this episode: 00:52 Improving the accuracy of weather forecasts with AI Short-term rain predictions are a significant challenge for meteorologists. Now, a team of researchers have come up with an artificial-intelligence based system that weather forecasters prefer…
 
A recent paper discussing footprints found years ago in New Mexico is shaking up the archaeological community. The footprints were dated to between 21,000 and 23,000 years ago - problematic because concrete evidence for the earliest sites sits at around 14,000 years ago. There are older sites, but, the evidence isn't great. This new research, howev…
 
Episode 3 As newly-minted principal investigators, Ali and Dan have grand plans for their research – but science is slow, especially when other demands loom large: hiring staff, mentoring and teaching students and, of course, the race to secure funding. Read a written version of Starting up in science See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out i…
 
Episode 2 Ali and Dan have landed positions as the heads of their very own labs. But how did they get to the starting line? Every scientist’s journey is different, and in this episode we hear Ali and Dan’s, which covers years, thousands of miles, and some very difficult decisions. Read a written version of Starting up in science See acast.com/priva…
 
Every year, thousands of scientists struggle to launch their own labs. For three years, a reporting team from Nature documented the lives of married couple Alison Twelvetrees and Daniel Bose as they worked to get their fledgling research groups off the ground. Frustrations over funding, a global pandemic, and a personal trauma have made this journe…
 
Australian scientists are developing new technologies to help protect coral from climate change. Earlier this year, a team of researchers used a mist-machine to artificially brighten clouds in order to block sunlight above Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. The project is the world’s first field trial of marine cloud brightening and is among a number …
 
Less than 1% of those in low income countries are fully vaccinated, and that number only rises to 10% in low-middle income countries. Meanwhile more than half of the population in wealthier countries have received a double dose with several now rolling out third dosess. In this episode of Coronapod we look at the role of pharmaceutical manufacturer…
 
Keeping instruments safe in the field in hard. This week John talks about his favorite disguise for instruments and telemetry. Fun Paper Friday Can a photo and some machine learning predict how corrupt you are as a politician? Blavatskyy, Pavlo. "Obesity of politicians and corruption in post‐Soviet countries." Economics of Transition and Institutio…
 
How tiny seed-like sensors could monitor the environment, and the latest from the Nature Briefing. In this episode: 00:45 Spinning seeds inspire floating electronics Researchers have developed miniature electronic-chips with wings that fall like seeds, which could be a new way to monitor the environment. Research article: Kim et al. Video: Seed-ins…
 
More than 50 years of missions to Mars paint a clear picture of a cold, dry, desert planet. And at the same time, photographs, minerals, and other data tell scientists that Mars once had as much water as Earth, or even more. Why are the two planets so different today? We're excited to feature an episode from our friends over at Stereo Chemistry, wh…
 
Getting power to things in the field is difficult and more complex than you'd think. This week we discuss a few of the many problems you are likely to face and ways we have fought them. Fun Paper Friday Reinventing the wheel happens a lot - but how often does it get published? This week we examine an example by looking at a paper that rediscovered …
 
There’s a lot packed into this episode and there’s even stuff we didn’t get to but have in the links below. We do this in three sections: 3D Scanning and Printing, Robots and Drones, and Art, Experimentation, and Whimsy. Links The Virtual Curation Laboratory Virtual Curation Lab on Instagram 3D Scanning and 3D Printing in Archaeology and Paleontolo…
 
Myrto Papadopoulou and Farbod Khosro Anjom spotlight the recent advances in surface-wave tomography for near-surface applications from August's The Leading Edge.In this episode, Myrto and Farbod discuss why surface-wave tomography has not been applied regularly to near-surface applications, highlight more efficient models they developed, explain ho…
 
How aquatic foods could help tackle world hunger, and how Australian wildfires spurred phytoplankton growth in the Southern Ocean. In this episode: 00:45 The role of aquatic food in tackling hunger Ahead of the UN’s Food Systems Summit, Nature journals are publishing research from the Blue Food Assessment, looking at how aquatic foods could help fe…
 
Magnetism is a mysterious topic and it took a long time for us humans to understand just the basics. This week we look at the history of magnetism! Fun Paper Friday Can whale calls be useful for seismologists? Find out in this week's Fun Paper! Kuna, Václav M., and John L. Nábělek. "Seismic crustal imaging using fin whale songs." Science 371.6530 (…
 
Jack Dvorkin highlights his upcoming Honorary Lecture, "Modern Rock Physics – Challenges and Solutions."Jack explains why some scientists have embraced unnecessary complexity, the best way to generate new scientific questions, the first step to embrace simplicity, and possible consequences if rock physics continues to trend towards complexity.Visit…
 
A new theory to explain missing geological time, the end of leaded petrol, and the ancient humans of Arabia. In this episode: 00:29 Unpicking the Great Unconformity For more than 150 years, geologists have been aware of ‘missing’ layers of rock from the Earth’s geological record. Up to one billion years appear to have been erased in what’s known as…
 
This episode comes with stories and lessons that mandates people not to think for others but to think with them. When everyone that is going to be affected by the outcome is included decision-making processes, we reach better conclusions that benefits all.--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.f…
 
The Johnstown Flood occurred on May 31, 1889, after the failure of the South Fork Dam, which is located on the south fork of the Little Conemaugh River, 14 miles upstream of the town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The dam, constructed to provide a recreational resource in part to support The South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club, broke after several day…
 
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