show episodes
 
Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
 
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show series
 
Population growth in the U.S. has slowed to its lowest rate since the 1930s according to recent Census data. How should we think about changes in our population size? On this episode, we talk with John Seager, who has written a book on population dynamics and is president and CEO of the nonprofit organization Population Connection.…
 
As we reconnect with neighbors and family members, many people have had a chance to think differently about a question that they have uttered thousands of times before: “how are you?” What does it mean to say you are doing well? How can we measure well-being? On this episode, we talk with Mohsen Joshanloo, associate professor at Keimyung University…
 
When the United States faced the 9-11 crisis in 2001, we heard a lot about first responders and the role they play in saving lives in the face of emergencies. What happens, though, when those first responders are asked to save lives in the middle of a pandemic? On this episode, we talk with Ross Owens, a social scientist with the U.S. Department of…
 
In the United States, employers are planning for people to return to workplaces, yet not everyone is ready to go and some of those who worked onsite throughout the pandemic are exhausted and not fully recovered from the trauma of the past year. On this episode, we talk with psychiatry professor Dr. Nadia Charguia of the University of North Carolina…
 
Addressing our plastic waste problem is important for the health of our planet. On this episode, we talk with two researchers who are trying to help, Mathieu Aguesse and Alexandre Truan of Schoolab and the University of California, Berkeley. They have worked with students and industry partners to generate innovative solutions to our plastic problem…
 
How can we assess the potential impact of policy innovations like requiring police to wear body cameras? David Yokum of Brown University has argued that experiments can help and he has spent his career -- working for the Obama administration, the mayor's office in Washington, D.C., and various universities -- demonstrating the utility of social sci…
 
The recent gas outage in the Southeastern United States highlighted possibilities for alternatives to gas-powered vehicles. Electric cars have emerged as a prominent option. On this episode, we talk with Dr. John Graham of Indiana University, who served in the Office of Management and Budget under President George W. Bush and is author of a new boo…
 
Examples of imposters have been in the headlines recently but cultural references to the phenomenon might be more prevalent than you realize. On this episode, we talk with two editors of a new book entitled The Imposter as Social Theory: Thinking with Gatecrashers, Cheats and Charlatans. Steve Woolgar is professor emeritus at Linkoping University i…
 
We all have stories about living during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some people, though, also have stories to tell about doing research during this challenging time. On this episode, we talk with researchers Seronda Robinson and Brittany Baker about the Advanced Center for COVID-19 Related Disparities (ACCORD) at North Carolina Central University.…
 
In many U.S. families, chores tend to fall on the shoulders of parents – and sometimes one parent – while children don’t contribute as much as a parent might like. Family life is not exactly the same around the world, however. In this episode, we talk with Lucia Alcala, a faculty member at California State University, Fullerton, who has studied cul…
 
For people who have the resources to participate, an important portion of life now is spent online on the Internet. Some of those online activities now include political expression and political behavior. On this episode, we talk with Deen Freelon of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill about what we know about online activism in its var…
 
Despite pandemic complications, many people still have opportunities to look for roommates. The idea of living with a stranger offers metaphors for the larger processes of building communities and societies. What can we learn about the choices people in making in selecting roommates and the biases that people harbor? On this episode, we talk with R…
 
The conveniences afforded by digital technology companies as we buy products and connect with others online in recent years are quite remarkable relative to the past. What might the costs for society be, though? On this episode, we talk with Scott Timcke, author of Algorithms and the End of Politics: How Technology Shapes 21st-Century American Life…
 
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