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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
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As many as 2000 people have been buried under rubble and dirt after a landslide in Papua New Guinea’s remote highlands this week. Video released days later showing locals digging with their hands is a reminder of how difficult disaster response is in a country that’s just four kilometres from the top of Australia. The PNG highlands are an inaccessi…
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There are currently a number of running campaigns concerned about the effects of social media on young people. These effects include exposure to harmful content to mental health issues, cyberbullying, depression and even suicide. And the proposed solution is to simply ban anyone under the age of 16 from social media for their own protection. But ho…
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Here’s a question for you: can you place a value on lost cultural heritage, on separation from land and on families divided? It’s not only a moral quandary. The Federal Court is currently trying to calculate how much compensation is owed in Western Australia's Pilbara region. Yindjibarndi Traditional Owners have been locked in a long-running legal …
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The 2024 Euros are just weeks away – with some of the best footballers in the world competing in an event that draws in hundreds of millions of viewers. But the legacy of the last Euros is still an uncomfortable topic for many in England. Not only because they lost, but also the scenes of violence and hooliganism that led to a national debate and a…
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On Monday, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Karim Khan announced he would apply for arrest warrants for senior Hamas leaders as well as Israel’s prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu and defence minister Yoav Gallant. So, how did the ICC’s prosecutor come to the point of applying for arrest warrants? What happens next? And can interna…
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The members of this federal Labor government have been pretty disciplined on not publicly criticising party policy. So it raised a few eyebrows when MPs from inner-city seats took aim at the government’s Future Gas Strategy. The plan pumps up gas as a vital part of the energy transition through to 2050 and beyond, which is at odds with moves to get…
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Julian Assange’s lawyer, Jennifer Robinson, describes the long, meandering court process Assange has faced as “punishment by process”. Just this week, in a decision that may have saved Assange from being immediately extradited to the United States, the British High Court ruled it will hear one more appeal against his extradition – but not until lat…
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When observing the Al Roj refugee camp in Northern Syria on Google Maps, you can see it’s only a few hundred metres away from an airport tarmac. But for the 40 Australian citizens stranded at the camp – with no water, electricity or any real plan for the future – getting on a plane home could still be years away. Today, special correspondent for Th…
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If you’ve bought salmon at the supermarket, there’s a strong chance it came from Tasmania. The island state is home to a billion-dollar salmon farming industry and much of it is located at Macquarie Harbour. That harbour is where Booker Prize-winning author Richard Flanagan grew up. But it’s also home to a 60-million-year-old creature whose fate ap…
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This week, Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most politically significant budget of his career – with the future of a Labor government and the country’s cost of living crisis on the line. Today, he joins 7am to discuss his vision for Australia’s economy and whether the government has done enough to end the living crisis. Socials: Stay in tou…
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It’s a budget we’ll be talking about for a long time, as we head to the next election and try to escape the cost of living crisis. But even though the budget is only 36 hours old, we’re starting to see the early criticisms from rival politicians emerge. So, has Labor spent enough to ease the cost of living? Or spent too much? And do the critics hav…
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Jim Chalmers delivered what could be the most important budget of his political career last night. But how much will it help with the cost of living and how will we feel the impact? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Paper Karen Barlow on the budget that’s attempting to reshape Australia’s response to the living crisis. Socials: …
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It’s budget week, which means crunch time for the leaders tasked with tackling how expensive Australia is right now. And the thing we’re all talking about is our grocery bills, why food seems to cost more each time we visit the supermarket. Today, national affairs correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe on what some call the great price …
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This week, as the federal budget is handed down, we’re bringing you The Cost: Inside the living crisis. We’ll explore the impact this crisis is having on our country, why it just isn’t ending and whether our leaders are doing enough to protect our standard of living. Today, executive director of the Australia Institute Richard Denniss on when price…
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The tasering of a 95-year-old grandmother, the double-murder of a Surry Hills couple, the Bruce Lehrmann defamation trial and now the spike in domestic violence. These are some of the biggest stories in Australia over the past 12 months, and all of them have drawn in one very powerful woman – Karen Webb, the commissioner of the NSW Police Force. Th…
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One of Australia’s favourite shows has a contentious sponsor this year. MasterChef, a show that delivers fairytale stories of home cooks rising to national celebrity, is being supported by the gas industry. So what does big gas want with MasterChef? And what are they paying for? Today, national correspondent for The Saturday Paper Mike Seccombe, on…
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Israeli airstrikes are targeting the southernmost city in Gaza and tanks have been seen entering the outskirts of the city. Rafah was once the last safe haven in Gaza, where civilians fleeing Israeli bombardment had been told to seek refuge. The United States, along with international allies, have long pushed for Israel not to invade the city. Toda…
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It’s a small mystery in Australian politics: Why was Peter Dutton’s first major policy as opposition leader a promise to build nuclear power plants? On the surface, it doesn’t seem like an obvious vote winner and early polling shows most Australians are yet to be convinced. But this may be less about votes and more about holding the Coalition toget…
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In recent years, Australia has faced a reckoning over the actions of some of our special forces soldiers, who have gone from decorated heroes to murderers accused of horrific war crimes against civilians. David McBride is the former military lawyer who first gave journalists documentary evidence of civilian killings in Afghanistan. To his supporter…
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Today, writer Angela Savage with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. Parents often face the dilemma of helping their children become independent, while not wanting to let them go. Angela’s story, ‘Fledglings’, tells the story of what changes when that moment finally comes.By Schwartz Media
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As Australia demanded answers to the domestic violence crisis, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese became a focal point in all the wrong ways when he got into a confrontation with a rally organiser on Sunday. But this week’s national cabinet meeting with state and territory leaders offered a chance to respond to the community’s concern and produce real…
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As Donald Trump zeroed in on his successful 2016 run to the presidency, he began to engage in what is called “catch and kill” journalism. Trump and his lawyers developed relationships with journalists, who were allegedly prepared to track down damaging stories aboutTrump, and then take money to ensure they would never be printed. Today, managing ed…
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It feels like hardly a week goes by where we don’t hear about a woman in Australia being killed by a man she knows. Intimate partner deaths increased by almost a third during the last reporting year and early counts by advocacy groups suggest this year is set to be even worse. The spike in killings has led to protests, a national outcry and Prime M…
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There are strict rules around how drug company representatives can interact with doctors to ensure they aren’t influencing how medications are prescribed. But when it comes to expensive medical devices inserted in our bodies during surgery – all sorts of screws, pacemakers and implants – those same rules don’t apply. Medical device sales reps are s…
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There’s an old adage in Canberra: every first-term government gets a second chance. But when voters head to the polls next year, could the current Labor government be an exception? With so many Australians feeling the cost-of-living crisis, and the government facing a slump in the polls, evidence is mounting that Labor will struggle to retain major…
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When Australia’s eSafety commissioner issued takedown orders to some of the world’s biggest tech companies at the beginning of this week, the commissioner probably didn’t realise it would put us on the frontline of a global battle over the internet. The orders were aimed at removing the kind of footage social media companies have agreed to remove i…
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The wait for elective surgery in our public hospitals is longer than ever, but it seems there’s a way to jump the queue. If you can afford to pay for private care in a public hospital, you might find yourself being offered more perks than just a free bathrobe and some slippers. Today, lawyer and contributor to The Monthly Russell Marks, on whether …
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An attack at a Western Sydney church last week was inextricably linked to social media. The bishop who was stabbed is a social media celebrity, the attack itself was live-streamed, and both the attack and the reaction may have been inflamed by online extremism. The Australian government is so concerned it has picked a fight with the global social m…
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Grace Tame knows how to advocate. Her campaigning for survivors of sexual assault and abuse helped to create real change and pushed powerful institutions to be better. Now, Tame is turning her focus onto something she has lived with her whole life and which is now on the agenda in Canberra, – autism and neurodivergence. Today, former Australian of …
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It’s now been a week since the Federal Court of Australia’s Justice Michael Lee ruled it was substantially true that Bruce Lehrmann raped Brittney Higgins in a minister’s office at Parliament House back in 2019. In other cases, that may have been the end of the matter. But this case has drawn in dozens of characters, with careers ended, others on t…
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Today, columnist Elizabeth Farrelly will read her piece about our modern cities and how they relate to the history of how humanity has imagined the perfect city. Farrelly is one of Australia’s foremost writers on urban development and the communities of our cities – having earned devoted readers at the Sydney Morning Herald and now at Schwartz Medi…
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At the end of the day, the people who decide what path Australia takes to solve the housing crisis are those in government. In this episode, we speak to the federal minister for housing, Julie Collins. Does the government think we’re in a crisis? How does she plan to ensure we all have a safe and affordable place to call home? And how will she conv…
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A solution to the housing crisis is one of the most sought-after ideas in Australia. Political careers, fortunes and the fate of a generation will rest on how we respond to the increasingly dire housing market, which means there are countless solutions to this crisis being debated throughout the country. In this episode of 7am’s five-part series, w…
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With federal, state and local governments promising to build more Australian homes, it’s fair to say that all levels of government want to fix the housing crisis. But are they building enough? Are they listening to the people they’re building it for? And who really benefits from the way we build housing in Australia? In this episode of 7am’s five-p…
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With home ownership out of reach, more and more younger Australians have no choice but to rent for much longer than their parents ever did – maybe for the rest of their lives. That puts younger Australians at the mercy of landlords, making some intensely angry and leading to what might be described as a “renters resistance”. In this episode of 7am’…
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This is the first episode of 7am’s new five-part special series on the housing crisis. What happened to housing in Australia over the past few decades wasn’t by chance. It’s the result of decades of deliberate decisions that have turned us into a nation of landlords and property speculators. This episode uncovers who broke the housing market, and i…
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When Penny Wong took the lectern for the keynote speech at a conference on foreign affairs this week, she could have done what politicians usually do at these events. She could have delivered a mundane speech about the same challenges we all know Australia faces in its region. Instead, she decided to float the idea that Australia should recognise a…
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Three years ago, Australia became the first nation in the world to make Facebook pay for news. Now, those deals are about to expire, and Facebook isn’t willing to renew them. That leaves Australia’s world-first deal hanging by a thread, and if the conflict escalates, it could even lead to Facebook and its other products, Instagram and WhatsApp, pul…
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Australian Border Force and Western Australian police spent the weekend searching for 15 men who had arrived in the country by boat. Eventually, all 15 were arrested and put on a flight to Nauru. The arrival of this boat comes as the federal government attempts to legislate controversial new laws, deflect criticism from the opposition and keep immi…
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Former Channel Seven producer Taylor Auerbach has given extraordinary evidence at Bruce Lehrmann’s trial against Channel Ten over defamation. Auerbach’s evidence is significant enough that the judge sensationally reopened the case, and it could impact the final verdict – but it has also led to explosive allegations that ask questions of the entire …
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The Albanese government was elected on a sense of optimism for the climate movement. But nearly two years later, there’s a growing sense of unease from the climate movement and traditional owners towards the government in Canberra. So, what’s going on? How has this distrust emerged? And will it practically change how we all live with the consequenc…
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Today, author and editor Sophie Cunningham reads her piece from a recent edition of The Saturday Paper. Australian author Georgia Blain chronicled her battle with cancer in a monthly column for The Saturday Paper, sadly passing away in 2016. Blain is remembered in this piece by her friend of over two decades, Sophie Cunningham – championing her leg…
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Israel’s killing of seven aid workers in Gaza has been met with international outrage. The workers at World Central Kitchen, including an Australian woman named Zomi Frankcom, were providing critical relief to Palestinians in the form of food. Their deaths now risk entrenching starvation further, as aid organisations begin to doubt whether they’re …
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Donald Trump is known for being the loudest, most controversial and outburst-prone politician of our time. Now, a judge has issued a gag order against him in an attempt to prevent further outbursts. Can Donald Trump really be told to be quiet? And will orders from the courts begin to hamper his chances of being re-elected as president? Today, senio…
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Some of Australia’s most powerful religious bodies have taken aim at Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and also the Greens – accusing them of threatening the future of religious freedom. But the cause of this backlash is simply the possibility that the government would work with the Greens to reform a 40-year-old loophole in our discrimination laws. …
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With an election looming in the United Kingdom and chaos among the British Conservative Party, 2024 could see a new prime minister taking residence at 10 Downing Street. Amid the political drama, a right-wing broadcaster named GB News has been stirring up debates, igniting culture wars and making headlines for its provocative social commentary. So,…
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Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. Today, we have a treat for those who think about the Roman Empire more than once a week. Even if you’re not an obsessive Ancient Rome aficionado, you may have heard of Mary Beard. With more than 20 books to her name, including the wildly successful SPQR, Mary might be most …
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Over the long weekend, we're featuring episodes from the podcast Read This. In this episode, host Michael Williams chats with author Briohny Doyle, whose most recent novel Why We Are Here explores the complexities of grief, both individual and collective. They discuss the role of writing during the pandemic and how relationships with non-human othe…
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Many Australians could have been infected with Covid-19 for the second, third or even fourth time in the last couple of months. That’s because a new variant of the virus has caused the biggest wave in over a year. But while for many the symptoms are milder, and the risks of serious illness are dropping – what do we need to know about the new varian…
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Yesterday, Labor’s emergency legislation on immigration detention was slammed by crossbenchers and the Greens as a “race to the bottom” on the way governments treat asylum seekers. But in the lead up to that move, criticisms that Labor is trying to be tougher than the Coalition on immigration laws have been growing louder. So, why is Labor intent o…
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