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Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York public
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Best Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York podcasts we could find (updated February 2020)
Best Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York podcasts we could find
Updated February 2020
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When does a scientific discovery become accepted fact? Why have scientific facts become easy to deny? And what can we do about it? In his latest book “The Workshop and the World: What Ten Thinkers Can Teach Us About Science and Authority” philosopher and science historian Robert P. Crease considers the origins of our scientific infrastructure and t…
 
More than one out of every six American children lives below the poverty line. But statistics alone can’t convey just how rampant this issue has become. In his new book “Invisible Americans: The Tragic Cost of Child Poverty,” Jeff Madrick brings to light the often invisible reality and irreparable damage of child poverty in the US. Join us for a di…
 
Michael Patrick MacDonald is the author of the best-selling memoir, "All Souls: A Family Story From Southie" and the acclaimed "Easter Rising: A Memoir of Roots and Rebellion." He has been awarded an American Book Award, A New England Literary Lights Award, and a fellowship at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study Center. He is also a regular…
 
In his new book “Running Against the Devil: A Plot to Save America from Trump--and Democrats from Themselves” former Republican strategist Rick Wilson draws from his decades of national political experience to offer this case-by-case takedown of a president he considers the worst in history. In this eye-opening work, Wilson blows the lid off Trump’…
 
Anastasia Nesvetailova and Ronen Palan’s new book “Sabotage: The Hidden Nature of Finance” is an intellectual detective story tracing the origins of financial sabotage, starting with the work of a prescient American economist who saw the capacity for banks and businesses to dissemble and profit as early as the 1920s. Join us for a discussion with t…
 
In the late 1930s, as part of the government employees tracked down 3,000 men and women who had been enslaved before and during the Civil War. The federal workers asked them probing questions about slave life. What did they think about their slaveholders? What songs did they sing? What games did they play? Did they always think about escaping? The …
 
Throughout its history, New York City has been a battleground for international espionage, a place where secrets are created, stolen and passed on through clandestine meetings and covert communications. In over 200 entries, H. Keith Melton and Robert Wallace’s beloved guidebook “Spy Sites of New York City: A Guide to the Region’s Secret History” ta…
 
In the 1820s, few Americans could imagine a viable future for black children. Even abolitionists saw just two options for African American youth—permanent subjection or exile. Anna Mae Duane’s book “Educated for Freedom: The Incredible Story of Two Fugitive Schoolboys Who Grew Up to Change a Nation” tells the story of James McCune Smith and Henry H…
 
Before he became a familiar journalistic voice at WNYC or WBAI’s former general manger, Robert Hennelly was national affairs correspondent for Pacifica Network News. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Slate, the Village Voice, the Christian Science Monitor, the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press along with dozens of other magazines a…
 
“Are you a fan of Whispering Angel rosé? Or for that matter, any Provençal rosé? What about Chianti? Or Côtes du Rhône? Do you drink Spanish wines—Rioja, Albariño, Priorat, Cava? Barolo? Barbaresco? How about Prosecco? Would you like to pay 100 percent more for them in 2020? Or perhaps not even be able to find them for sale at all?” read the openin…
 
Sigurd Hole has been one of Norway's most sought after musicians for the past decade. He has been part of more than 40 album releases and has appeared on many of the world’s most famous stages, from Lincoln Center to the Wellington Opera House, from Rio de Janeiro’s Cidade des Artes to the De Roma in Antwerp. In this installment of Leonard Lopate a…
 
In his new book “In Defense of Public Service: How 22 Million Government Workers Will Save our Republic,” former deputy mayor and police chief-turned-CNN commentator Cedric L. Alexander argues that these people are not pursuing a hidden “deep state” agenda. They are the analysts, scientists, lawyers, accountants, educators, consultants, enforcers o…
 
The human brain is an extraordinary machine. Its ability to process information and adapt to circumstances by reprogramming itself is unparalleled and it remains the best source of inspiration for recent developments in artificial intelligence. In his new book “How We Learn: Why Brains Learn Better Than Any Machine…for Now,” Stanislas Dehaene decod…
 
In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, our favorite handymen Alvin and Laurence Ubell discuss new laws aimed at demystifying some of the regulations protecting renters' quality of life and take your calls.By Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
 
Do you have questions about wine that you’re afraid will get you scowled at by the cashier at your local shop? In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, wine expert Josh Wesson takes your questions on all aspects of wine and wine making.By Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
 
From his star-making roles in "Bull Durham" and Robert Altman’s “The Professional” to his enduring performance alongside Morgan Freeman in “The Shawshank Redemption,” Tim Robbins holds a special place in the hearts and minds of movie fans. In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, Tim talks about his legendary career and his new touri…
 
Do you have any unresolved questions about this odd creation we call the English language? In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, Kathryn and Ross Petras, authors of the New York Times bestseller “You're Saying It Wrong: A Pronunciation Guide to the 150 Most Commonly Mispronounced Words--and Their Tangled Histories of Misuse” and “…
 
“Citizen K” is the latest film from Alex Gibney, winner of the 2008 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. The outrageous story of cunning uber-oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky – once the wealthiest person in Russia, who amassed his $15 billion fortune in Siberian oil, only to be imprisoned by Vladimir Putin, “Citizen K” tells a tale that is trul…
 
Martin Luther King Jr. would have been 91 years old this year. “I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states,” King wrote in his 1963 Letter from a Birmingham Jail. “I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” In celebration of …
 
Michael J. Thompson and Gregory R. Smulewicz-Zucker’s book “Anti-Science and the Assault on Democracy: Defending Reason in a Free Society” features essays they edited on the role that science must play in democratic society—science defined not just in terms of technology but as a way of approaching problems and viewing the world. In this collection…
 
Every day on Leonard Lopate at Large, we bring in writers, artists, reporters and artists to answer our questions about their area of expertise. But there are some questions that even the experts have a hard time answering. In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI, Leonard and Executive Producer Jesse Lent open the phones so you can h…
 
Charlie Morrow is a composer, sound artist, performer, and innovator whose goal over the past four decades has been to bring experimental sound and music to a wider audience. He’s also the composer behind our opening and closing theme music on Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI. From his work as part of the avant-garde Fluxus movement in New York in t…
 
The new Resonance Records box set “Hittin’ The Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943)” is the first large-scale collection of the pivotal early recordings of Nat King Cole’s 29-year recording career. Many tracks in the collection, which focuses on the instrumental work Cole did on piano before he became famous as a singer, are receiving their first offi…
 
Over the course of his prolific career, trombonist, composer, producer, educator and NEA Jazz Master Delfeayo Marsalis has been hailed as one of the “most imaginative...trombonists of his generation.” It’s a title that reflects decades of musical exploration, preparation and risk-taking, much of which began during his childhood in New Orleans, wher…
 
Since opening in 1931, the George Washington Bridge, linking New York and New Jersey, has become the busiest bridge in the world, with over 100 million vehicles passing over it each year. Many people also consider it the most beautiful bridge in the world, yet remarkably little has been written about it. In this installment of Leonard Lopate at Lar…
 
S. James Gates Jr. and Cathie Pelletier’s “Proving Einstein Right: The Daring Expeditions that Changed How We Look at the Universe” chronicles the perilous journey of the scientists who set out to prove the theory of relativity. Their results would catapult the German-born theoretical physicist Albert Einstein to international fame and forever chan…
 
Dr. Sarah Hill’s new book “This Is Your Brain on Birth Control: The Surprising Science of Women, Hormones, and the Law of Unintended Consequences” shines a light on how hormonal birth control affects women in ways we are just now beginning to understand. By allowing women to control their fertility, the birth control pill has revolutionized women's…
 
Before being known for his groundbreaking political reporting at WNYC, Bob Hennelly was national affairs correspondent for Pacifica Network News. His written work has appeared in the New York Times, the Village Voice, the Christian Science Monitor, the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press along with dozens of other magazines and newspapers. His wor…
 
From longtime Fox News contributor, guest anchor and two-time New York Times bestselling author Tobin Smith comes a new book, “Foxocracy: Inside the Network's Playbook of Tribal Warfare an insider's account of the Fox News playbook.” Tobin’s book examines the production secrets and manipulation strategies the top-rated cable news network uses to in…
 
In 1960, Hall of Fame hitter Mickey Mantle signed a 1-year contract worth $65,000 a year—the Yankees were giving him a $7,000 pay cut. Since there was no free agency in 1960, Mantle had no place to go other than back to the Bronx. The situation didn’t change for players until Marvin Miller was elected as the first executive director of the players’…
 
On May 30, 1921, an incident occurred in the elevator of a Greenwood office building. Though what actually transpired is unclear, a young Black man was arrested for attempted assault on a White teenage girl. The next day, a newspaper report about the arrest incited an armed White mob and things quickly escalated. Over the next day, the mob grew in …
 
In their new book Wildhood: The Epic Journey from Adolescence to Adulthood in Humans and Other Animals, Harvard evolutionary biologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and award-winning science writer Kathryn Bowers examine what the animal kingdom can teach us about childhood and adulthood. Join us for a discussion of Wildhood with Barbara Natterson-Horo…
 
Henry Louis Gates Jr. wrote in a New Yorker profile that Bob Holman has “done more to bring poetry to cafes and bars than anyone since [Lawrence] Ferlinghetti.” He brought the spoken word scene and poetry slams to New York City twice, first as the co-director of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, then as the founder of the Bowery Poetry Club. He further dem…
 
Though considered too morbid for many Americans who aren’t visiting departed loved one to visit, according to Vincent and Robert Gardino, cemeteries are peaceful and welcoming places full of wonderful stories. In their new book “Grave Trippers: History at Our Feet,” the two brothers visit gravesites of noted historical personalities on the East Coa…
 
When Peter Asher was 19 years old, his younger sister began dating an up-and coming musician named Paul McCartney. Fueled by the Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership, The Beatles were about to change the world and Peter’s life forever. When he asked Paul if he could record one of his songs The Beatles had rejected called “A World Without Love,”…
 
When it comes to fixing things around the house, there’s no one better to tell you what do and how to do it than Alvin and Laurence Ubell. In this installment of “Leonard Lopate at Large” on WBAI, we open the phones so that Al and Larry Ubell can answer your questions about all of the potential home repair projects that can come with transitioning …
 
New York Times correspondent Sam Roberts has told the story of New York through its people (“Only in New York”) and its artifacts (“A History of New York in 101 Objects”). Now he rises to another challenge—can bricks, glass, wood, and mortar reveal how and why New York City evolved into the nation's largest metropolis. In his latest book “A History…
 
“If you’ve ever noticed a slimy film of algae on a rock, chances are you didn’t pay it much attention,” writes Carl Zimmer in his Nov. 14 New York Times article How Did Plants Conquer Land? These Humble Algae Hold Clues. “But some of these overlooked species hold clues to one of the greatest mysteries of evolution, scientists have found: how plants…
 
According to a recent ProPublica article by Rachel Glickhouse, the number of police precincts across the US reporting hate crimes to the FBI fell slightly in 2018. With just 13 percent of the responding precincts admitting to any hate crimes in 2018 and Alabama and Wyoming claiming zero hate crimes over that same period, either a radical moral tran…
 
Christopher Ryan’s new book “Civilized to Death: The Price of Progress” explores the ways in which “progress” has perverted the way we live: how we eat, learn, feel, mate, parent, communicate, work and die. Join us for a hard look at the drawbacks of modern life in this edition of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.…
 
Have you ever asked yourself “why should I listen to classical music?” or “how can I get the most from the listening experience?” In his book “For the Love of Music: A Conductor's Guide to the Art of Listening,” acclaimed maestro John Mauceri explores how to get the most out of experiencing classical music. A friend and protégé of Leonard Bernstein…
 
It's no secret that the goal of corporate-owned media is to increase the profits of the few, not to empower the many. As a result, people are increasingly immersed in an information system structured to reinforce their social biases and market to their buying preferences. In their book “United States of Distraction: Media Manipulation in Post-Truth…
 
Have you ever wondered why birds evoke such a strong curiosity in humans? There aren’t lizard-watchers or beetle-watchers. Ornithologist David B. Lank is a researcher at Simon Fraser University’s department of biological sciences studying the behavior of shorebirds, including breeding and migration biology and the relationship between predator and …
 
The public lands of the western United States include 450 million acres of grassland, steppe land, canyons, forests and mountains. It's one of the last unspoiled realms of the American West and it is under assault as never before. Journalist Christopher Ketcham has been documenting the confluence of commercial exploitation and governmental miscondu…
 
Opening with a tender moment shared with William Gale Gedney on the Brooklyn Bridge in 1959, Joseph Caldwell’s “In The Shadow Of The Bridge: A Memoir” charts his three decades spent in downtown Manhattan pining for the great photographer. By the early 1980s with the AIDS epidemic terrorizing New York City and the atmosphere of free love and sex rep…
 
Bob Hennelly’s writing has been featured in the New York Times, the Village Voice, the Christian Science Monitor, the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press along with dozens of other magazines and newspapers. He has appeared on “60 Minutes” and C-Span's “America and the Courts.” Join us for a wide-ranging discussion with Bob about some of the local …
 
Monona Rossol is a chemist, artist, and industrial hygienist. She was born into a theatrical family and worked as a professional entertainer from age 3 to 17. Currently, she is the president of Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing health and safety services to the arts. Monona is also is the Hea…
 
Monona Rossol is a chemist, artist, and industrial hygienist. She was born into a theatrical family and worked as a professional entertainer from age 3 to 17. Currently, she is the president of Arts, Crafts and Theater Safety, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing health and safety services to the arts. As part of WBAI's fall fu…
 
We live in a time of crises according to Paul S. Adler—economic turmoil, environmental degradation, social disintegration and international rivalry. In "The 99 Percent Economy: How Democratic Socialism Can Overcome the Crises of Capitalism," the professor of management and organization, environmental studies and sociology at the University of South…
 
On our first day back on the air after the station was taken over by a rogue faction at the Pacifica network, WBAI’s program director Linda Perry and general manager Berthold Reimers take your calls and try to explain the bizarre events of the past few weeks.By Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
 
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