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In this podcast, Leslie Y. Garfield Tenzer, Professor of Law and host of Law to Fact, teams up with West Academic to bring you interesting conversations about contemporary legal issues. The podcast provides listeners with an overview of the kinds of stories in the news today. Listeners leave with enough insight to continue the conversation with friends and colleagues.
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Lost in Redonda

Lost in Redonda

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A podcast discussing backlist gems and the Spanish writer Javier Marías, late the King of Redonda. In Season 2 we read the novels of Muriel Spark. From Lori Feathers and Tom Flynn.
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In This Episode... Natalie Nanasi, Director of the Judge Elmo B. Hunter Legal Center for Victims of Crimes Against Women and Associate Professor of Law, shares her extraordinary work on preventative gun violence. She discusses United States v. Rahimi, which is before the Supreme Court this term. Rahimi considers whether the federal law that prohibi…
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We’re joined today by Mark Haber of Coffee House Press (formerly of Brazos Bookstore in Houston). Mark is the author of two novels, Reinhardt’s Garden and Saint Sebastian’s Abyss, and the forthcoming novel Lesser Ruins, as well as a forthcoming novella, Ada. We chat about his work as well as Austerlitz by W.G. Sebald, translated by Anthea Bell. A q…
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In This Episode... I speak with Professor Doron Dorfman, Associate Professor of Law about his newest article, Penalizing Prevention: The Paradoxical Legal Treatment of Preventive Medicine. About Our Guest.. Professor Dorfman’s research and teaching focus on disability law, health law, employment law, torts, and family law. His work has won multiple…
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In this episode... Professor Kimberly Holst, Dean’s Fellow for Innovation and Clinical Professor of Law, at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, explains the NextGen Bar, what it is, when it is, and what states will ask future lawyers to partake. About our guest... Kimberly Holst is a Clinical Professor of Law at the …
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Today Spencer Ruchti of Third Place Books joins to chat about The Tanners by Robert Walser, translated by Susan Bernofsky. We actually recorded this back in November and are glad to get it out into the world. Early on Spencer dips out momentarily due to an alarm in the store, but all ended up being right with the world. At least in that instant. Th…
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In This Episode... Colin Levy, Esq. shares the importance of learning legal tech in law school and embracing it in practice. We discuss his book, the Legal Tech Eco System (available on Amazon) and he shares excellent pointers for incorporating AI into your law school and legal workproduct. About Our Guest... Colin Levy is a lawyer and tech maven. …
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In This Episode... Professor Michael Vitiello and I have a lively discussion about originalism, a constitutional and statutory interpretation method increasingly used by the members of the Supreme Court. About Our Guest... Distinguished Professor of Law Michael Vitiello of the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law is a nationally-recogn…
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Kicking off 2024 we welcome Tara Cheesman to the podcast with her recommendation, Being Here Is Everything: The Life and Times of Paula Modersohn-Becker by Marie Darriussecq, translated by Penny Hueston. Tara is a freelance critic, former judge of the Best Translated Book Award, and she brings us our first work of nonfiction. We have an absolutely …
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In This Episode... I speak with Dr. Lisa Benjamin, Associate Professor of Law at Lewis and Clark Law School, about the benefits of Electronic Vehicles. Dr. Benjamin takes an honest look at the benefits and burdens of driving an EV (BTW, the benefits far outweigh the burdens) and explores the many consequences of continuing our dependence on fossil …
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In This Episode... I speak with Professor Tracy Norton, Louisianna State University School of Law, and Dr. Susan Tanner, Brandeis Law School, about the AI literacy. This episode is particularly helpful to those engaged in legal research. About Our Guests... Tracy L. M. Norton is the Erick Vincent Anderson Professor of Professional Practice at Louis…
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In This Episode... Professor Michael Hunter Schwartz, Dean of McGeorge School of Law shares his ideas on promoting equity in the classroom. He explains initiatives that the administration and professors can take to make students feel comfortable in their learning experience—which translates into a better learning environment. Dean Schwartz offers s…
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In This Episode... Professor Stephanie McMahon explains why law schools should flip the traditional model of law school learning, suggesting that second-year students should engage in more “field work” such as externships and clinics, saving the third year for the kind of doctrinal courses that are necessary to pass the bar. It’s a compelling argum…
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In This Episode... We conclude our series on lawyers working to prevent climate change. Professor Jason Czarnezki, the Elisabeth Haub School of Law, joins us to discuss his most recent article, Disclosure, Greenwashing & The Future of ESG Litigation in which he and co-author Barbara Ballan explain the laws and regulations that cover consumer and se…
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In This Episode... I speak with Professors Michael Vanderburgh and Sarah Light about their book, Private Environmental Governance. About Our Guests... Sarah E. Light is the Mitchell J. Blutt and Margo Krody Blutt Presidential Professor and the Professor of Legal Studies & Business Ethics at Wharton Business School. Professor Light’s research examin…
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In This Episode... Darryl Carbanaro, General Counsel at Generate Capital, PBC explains, ESG, which stands for Environmental, Social and Business Growth. ESG aspects of a company’s activities are the three main evaluation standards utilized to measure a company’s societal and sustainability policies and practices. ESG criteria are applied most frequ…
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In This Episode... Professor Camila Bustos of Pace Law School discusses the important work Law Students for Climate Accountability. When we think about law students and climate change, we think about student advocacy work. The organization, Law Students for Climate Change, is a bit different. LS4CA harnesses the power of law students in their decis…
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The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie is upon us and it does not disappoint. Too much to say about this one and, as always, we could have gone an hour longer and still not covered it all. An absolutely fantastic novel and one that certainly lives up to the hype and praise that surrounds it. Titles/authors mentioned: The Secret History by Donna Tartt O Cale…
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We stand on the precipice, one episode away from THE PRIME! Before that, though, we discuss The Bachelors, a fantastic novel chock full of some of the strangest characters Spark has written, which is really saying something. Mediums, epileptics, blackmail, criminality, and much, much more abound in this one. And one of the funniest scenes yet invol…
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We’re edging closer to THE PRIME, but today we chat about The Ballad of Peckham Rye. Spark’s novels are incredibly fun, but this might be the wildest, featuring an incredible character name (Dougal Douglas), a lot of absenteeism, a textile factory, a Nun Tunnel, and dancing. Lots of dancing. Click here to subscribe to our Substack and find us on th…
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It is the season of giving, and what better topic to discuss than Nonprofit Law. Professor Jon Brown of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law is here to explain nonprofit law. We discuss all things nonprofit including the murky line between for-profit and charitable companies. There is a great discussion of ChatGPT in here too! About Our Guest: Professo…
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This week we discuss Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants, an absolutely wonderful gem of a novel from French author Mathias Énard, translated by Charlotte Mandell. In 150ish pages Énard recreates the Constantinople of the early 16th Century and the brief time Michelangelo resided there to build a grand bridge. If you’ve not read Énard before…
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In this episode, Harold Kaplan, M.H.A., J.D., presents a primer on alternative dispute resolution and in particular a quick overview of how arbitration is an alternative dispute resolution process. About Our Guest: Harold Kaplan is a graduate of Pace University School of Law (J.D. 1983), and also Pace’s Lubin School of Business (B.B.A. 1972, with t…
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This week we discuss Memento Mori, Spark’s third novel and, as we’ve come to expect, it’s a really fun ride. This go-round she brings us into the lives of septuagenarians and octogenarians as they fume, backbite, explore their sexual proclivities, and all come to terms (or not) with their impending deaths. And, of course, it’s very, very funny. Cli…
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In this episode, Professor Joan McLeod Heminway, University of Tenessee School of Law, analyzes the popular television show, Succession, through a business organization professor's lens. Professor Heminway is using the show as a vehicle to teach corporate governance next semester. We promise there are no spoilers! About Our Guest: Professor Heminwa…
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In this episode, Professor Paul Rink discusses Held v. Montana, the case brought by Our Children's Trust on behalf of sixteen Montana youths. The plaintiffs successfully pleaded their case that the Montana State Constitution guarantees them a right to a clean and healthy environment. Professor Rink worked for Our Children's Trust and shares his fir…
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Episode 5 of Season 2: we get to chat with Robin McLean about Ceremony by Leslie Marion Silko. And, yeah, this is probably our best episode so far, which isn’t shocking because we’re talking about talking with Robin McLean. So, all that aside, it’s a great conversation and one that could have gone on for hours and hours yet. We could have gone deep…
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In this episode, Professor Randolph McLaughlin of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, discusses the upcoming documentary How to Sue the Klan . How to Sue the Klan is the story of how Five Black women from Chattanooga used legal ingenuity to take on the Ku Klux Klan in a historic 1982 civil case, fighting to hold them accountable fo…
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In Episode 4 of Season 2 we dig into Muriel Spark’s sophomore effort, Robinson. Gotta say: it’s incredible and we couldn’t be more excited to keep on keeping on with her work. This time around we trade London (mostly) for a lonely island in the Atlantic and a story that is funny, tense, clever, whimsical, and just an all-around masterclass in write…
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In this episode, Professor Renee Knake Jefferson, Doherty Chair in Legal Ethics at the University of Houston Law Center, sheds insight into why the Supreme Court is unlikely to adopt its own code of Ethics. Our discussion looks back at why the Supreme Court is the only judicial body exempt from an ethics code and considers proposals that may become…
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Having sorted some annoying technical issues, herewith Episode 3 of Season 2 (our way of apologizing for the delay in uploading this episode) in which we discuss The Conqueror by Jan Kjærstad, translated by Barbara Haveland and published by Open Letter Books. And to kick off our series of guest hosts, Chad Post of Open Letter Books (and Dalkey Arch…
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In this episode, Professor Tiffany Li shares insights on the privacy implications of artificial intelligence (AI). She shares findings from her article, Algorithm Destruction, which argues that contemporary privacy law does not go far enough to protect our privacy interests, particularly where artificial intelligence and machine learning are concer…
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We kick off our season-long read of Muriel Spark's novels this week and what a start! The Comforters is Spark's debut, published in 1956, and is, quite simply, magnificent. Lori and Tom wax heavily on how impressive this novel is and how incredibly fun it is, too! It's going to be quite a great season judging by this title alone. Click here to subs…
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In this episode, I speak with Aliza Shatzman, President and Founder of the Legal Accountability Project. Aliza shares her experiences, her work with the Legal Accountability Project and insights about ensuring a positive clerkship experience. About Our Guest: Aliza Shatzman, the President and Founder of the Legal Accountability Project is an attorn…
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And we’re back! Welcome to Season Two of Lost in Redonda. We kick things off with a backlist conversation on Chronicle of the Murdered House by Lucio Cardoso, translated by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson, published by Open Letter Books. It’s probably one of the fastest moving 600 page sagas of a Brazilian family you’re likely to encounter.…
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In this episode: Professor and legal historian Elizabeth Katz shares the history of women in the legal profession dating back to the first women lawyer in 1869. She highlights the gains women have made in the profession including the fact that women now make up over 50% of all students entering law school. About Our Guest: Professor Elizabeth D. Ka…
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In this episode, I speak with Professor Etienne Toussaint about his article, The Abolition of Food Suppression. The 13th Amendment is best known for abolishing slavery and indentured servitude. However, it also gives Congress the authority to pass laws that further systems connected to slavery. On this episode, Professor Ettiene Toussaint discusses…
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In this episode, Professor Mike Vitiello, Distinguished Professor of Law at McGeorge School of Law, discusses his new book, The Victims' Rights Movement: What It Gets Right and What It Gets Wrong. In our fascinating discussion, Professor Vitiello explores some of the consequences of the victim's rights movement, including excessive punishment, exac…
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In this episode, I speak with Andrew Ziaja, assistant professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law and former lawyer for the NLRB about the SAG-AFTRA and Writer’s Guild Strikes. Professor Ziaja explains the power of collective bargaining, how the gig economy relates to unionization, and AI’s role in driving the strikes. About Our Guest: A…
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Here it is, folks, our final episode on Your Face Tomorrow and the last part of our Marías project. It's a longer one, but very worth it if we do say so ourselves. Our next season and new project will kick off in a couple weeks' time, but before that a thank you for listening along. It's a fun project and one we hope folks are getting as much out o…
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In this episode, I speak with Dean Emily Waldman about recent Supreme Court decisions. Last June, the Supreme Court issued several somewhat controversial rulings on issues ranging from free speech to affirmative action to voting rights. Dean Waldman who unpacks the decisions in three cases in particular, Moore v. Harper, which concerned whether the…
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In this episode ... I speak with Professor Dan Croxall of McGeorge Law School about the law of Craft Beer. This enlightening and fun conversation explores the law related to representing craft beer specialists and demystifies many misconceptions about the beer many of us love to purchase and enjoy. About our guest.... Professor Dan Croxall created …
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In this episode... Professor Jon Choi shares his thoughts on using artificial intelligence to enhance the study and practice of law. Professor Choi shares insights on the future of the profession and law school learning in light of AI advancements and explains the benefits and burdens of using AI to assist in creating legal works. In this discussio…
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It's very strange to be this close to the end of our Marías focus, but that's rather how time moves, ever forward (unless you're Marías and can make time a rather fungible thing in your novels...). This is a fun episode, touching on East End gangsters, Spandau Ballet, the Spanish Civil War, swordplay, and more. And a couple of characters from the p…
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And now we enter the homestretch. Over the next few episodes we'll tackle Marías' masterpiece, Your Face Tomorrow. Starting, of course, with the first volume, Fever and Spear. Once we wrap up the Marías project we're going to take a week or so off and then we'll be back with more backlist dives and a new author whose work we'll spend some time digg…
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This week we dive into Christian Kracht's Imperium, and boy do we ever go deep (sorry/not sorry). It's an incredible piece of historical fiction (one of Tom's favorites and, now, one of Lori's) that follows one man's attempts to manifest his destiny to live in the tropics and subsist only on the noble coconut. And walk around nude. In the German So…
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A fun discussion this week of two novels published almost 30 years apart in The Infatuations and The Man of Feeling. We walk down some interesting paths and may get ourselves into a moral quandary or two (wouldn't be a discussion of Marías without some moral murkiness, now would it?). These are the last two Marías novels we discuss before wrapping …
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We're going weekly! As the episodes have grown longer we've decided to split them up so instead of discussing two titles per episode (and delivering a 2+ hour podcast) every other week we're switching to one title every week. A guide to the next few episodes will be up on the Substack shortly. This week we dig into Marie NDiaye's My Heart Hemmed In…
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In our sixth episode we discuss Gob’s Grief by Chris Adrian for our backlist deep dive. In the Marías portion we dig into Thus Bad Begins (spoiler alert: it’s phenomenal). This is a doozy of an episode, so stay hydrated and do be a hero: listen to the whole 2+ hours in one go! Books mentioned in this episode: Names on the Land: A Historical Account…
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Lori and Tom discuss Marías' final novel, Tomás Nevinson, just published in the US on May 23rd. A warning that spoilers do occur, especially after the 37 minute mark, so listener beware. Next episode we will return to discussing backlist in addition to our Marías deep-dives. Click here to subscribe to our Substack and do follow us on the socials, @…
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To mark the publication of Marías final novel, Tomás Nevinson, we're spending this episode and our next episode diving into the twinned works of Berta Isla and Tomás Nevinson. On this episode we dive deep into Berta (warning: we do rather go into the plot in a more significant manner than we have with other titles discussed thus far). And in two we…
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