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Best Louisa Lim podcasts we could find (updated April 2020)
Best Louisa Lim podcasts we could find
Updated April 2020
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The Little Red Podcast: interviews and chat celebrating China beyond the Beijing beltway. Hosted by Graeme Smith, China studies academic at the Australian National University's Department of Pacific Affairs and Louisa Lim, former China correspondent for the BBC and NPR, now with the Centre for Advancing Journalism at Melbourne University. We are the 2018 winners of podcast of the year in the News & Current Affairs category of the Australian Podcast Awards. Follow us @limlouisa and @GraemeKSm ...
 
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show series
 
COVID-19 isn't just destroying economies, it's also reshaping the global order. In less than a month, the novel coronavirus has moved from being China's Chernobyl to being an advertisement for China’s brand of governance. As Western governments, in particular the US, fail to grapple with this enormous public health challenge, China is presenting it…
 
The “people's war” on COVID-19 has brought enforcers in hazmat suits onto the streets of Wuhan, where they're bundling ordinary citizens into vans, giving Han Chinese urbanites a taste of the kind of state violence that is normally reserved for dissidents and troublesome ethnic groups. In this episode, we discuss the changing nature of state violen…
 
The coronavirus that has infected 70,000 people is being compared to China's Chernobyl in its political and economic fallout, but just how much of an inflection point will it be? This crisis is threatening the previously unchallenged authority of President Xi Jinping. It could reshape domestic policy imperatives and embed techno-authoritarian tende…
 
Judging by the news headlines China is ramping up its industrial espionage efforts: secret payments to high-profile scientists, massive hacks of foreign universities and clumsy attempts to steal trade secrets the old-fashioned way. Intelligence agencies in the US and Australia have both issued dire warnings about the existential dangers posed by th…
 
In the Xi Jinping era, China is quietly embedding core socialist values into every aspect of life, including the judicial system. When core socialist values were introduced in 2013, they sounded like one more slogan in the pantheon of forgettable party dogmas, but now they're gaining teeth. In this episode we examine how core socialist values are r…
 
When the Hong Kong film Ten Years (Sap nin) came out in 2015, it was pulled from cinemas after Chinese state-run media described it as a 'virus of the mind'. Once seen as dystopian with its scenes of mass protest and police brutality, it now looks prophetic in a world where 88% of the Hong Kong population has been exposed to teargas. In this episod…
 
With cinema takings in the United States at a 22-year low, Hollywood moguls are looking to an unlikely saviour: China. With box office revenues growing at 9 percent, Hollywood is scrambling to find the formula for movies that make the cut of China’s 34 approved films and appeal to Chinese audiences. For every surprise hit, like The Meg and Warcraft…
 
As China's leaders gathered in Beijing to survey troops, fireworks and their latest missiles, a different scene was unfolding in Hong Kong. Police shot an 18-year old protestor in the chest and unleashed a staggering 1400 rounds of tear gas on the population. The protests originally targeted the extradition bill and then grew into democratic protes…
 
On the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China, has CCP Chairman Xi Jinping overreached? He's facing blowback everywhere from Hong Kong to Xinjiang amid an escalating trade war with the US. Even his signature infrastructure project, the Belt and Road Initiative, has run into trouble. Is the world entering a new cold war? …
 
The South Pacific nation of the Solomon Islands may be on the verge of switching diplomatic allegiance from Taiwan to China, which would leave only sixteen nations recognising Taiwan. When Manasseh Sogavare was appointed prime minister of the Solomons for the fourth time in April, he vowed to review the country’s relations with Taiwan, even though …
 
As the news broke that Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam had withdrawn the extradition bill that had sparked three months of unrest in Hong Kong, Little Red Podcast co-host Louisa Lim was moderating the event 'Be Water: Hong Kong vs China'. This panel event, featuring Hong Kong popstar and activist Denise Ho, Chinese artist Badiucao and author…
 
As Hong Kong enters its eleventh week of turmoil, we hear voices on the ground. From 15-year olds who can hardly remember how many times they have been teargassed to thirty-somethings ready to serve prison sentences, the consensus is that Hong Kong is playing out its endgame. We also travel across the political divide, to hear from attendees at a p…
 
By 2020, less than half a year from now, a social credit scheme will cover people and companies across China, “allowing the trustworthy to roam everywhere under heaven while making it hard for the discredited to take a single step.” It’s long been assumed the Chinese state would take the lead, but favored companies will doubtless profit from a data…
 
Our third Hong Kong emergency episode comes in the wake of the storming of the territory's Legislative Council on the 22nd anniversary of its return to mainland China. Louisa reports from the floor of the Legco chamber as it is occupied and vandalized by hundreds of demonstrators, all risking hefty jail terms. With Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carri…
 
We’re bringing you a second emergency podcast from Hong Kong, which has seen more record protests over the weekend. According to organisers, two million people—nearly one-third of Hong Kong residents—marched on Sunday, despite the Hong Kong government’s promise to shelve its unpopular extradition bill. With public faith in its institutions shattere…
 
We bring you an emergency podcast from Hong Kong, one day after extraordinary police violence saw 79 people injured by baton charges, rubber bullets and over 150 rounds of tear gas. This dark turn comes only a few days after one million Hong Kongers—one in seven residents—took to the streets to protest proposed legal amendments that would allow cit…
 
Tuesday June 4 marks the 30th anniversary of the deadly crackdown ordered by Deng Xiaoping, which killed hundreds – maybe thousands – of people in Beijing and Chengdu. While the campaign to erase all memory of the event continues, explosive new information has emerged in the lead up to the anniversary. It reveals new details about resistance to the…
 
With Chinese citizens’ lives increasingly coded into data streams, the question of who owns this data and how it gets used is largely up to private companies. They control massive volumes of personal information and are tasked by Xi Jinping with everything from astroturfing public opinion to monitoring one-to-one chat in real time. As these compani…
 
Hate mail, death threats and shadowy surveillance are facts of life for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy activists, five years after the Umbrella movement brought a million people onto the streets calling for greater democracy. Since then, 48 legal cases have been brought against 32 different activists, often on colonial-era public order offences. Louisa …
 
The Chairman of Everything Xi Jinping has emerged from the annual parliamentary meetings facing a rough year ahead. China's economy is growing at its slowest in nearly three decades, amid a massive trade war and spiralling local debt, with rumblings of discontent from delegates about everything from the Belt and Road Initiative to Made in China 202…
 
The Pacific is seeing a flurry of diplomatic activity: Australia is ‘stepping up’, New Zealand has ordered a ‘Pacific reset’ and even Great Britain is reopening missions in its former Pacific colonies. The reason for their sudden interest is simple: China. If Beijing comes good on $4 billion in aid pledges, it could overtake Canberra as the largest…
 
China has been engulfed by a controversy that strikes at the very heart of the nation—forget the South China Sea, rampant human rights abuses, even a looming economic crash. Last month food critic Chua Lam, otherwise known as the Food God, called for the end to the PRC’s most beloved dining craze: hot pot. The backlash has been immense, with enrage…
 
China is becoming a more unequal place for women, in 2018 slipping for a fifth consecutive year in the World Economic Forum's Gender Gap index. Chairman Mao may have proclaimed that women can hold up half the sky, but the Communist party under Xi Jinping holds a far narrower view of female roles, cracking down on feminist activists and backing trad…
 
The Vatican and China have signed a deeply controversial agreement on the appointment of bishops, ending the cold war that has frozen ties since 1950. That deep freeze led to schisms between the official and underground churches, with some clergy persecuted for decades and the church refusing to recognise Beijing's handpicked bishops. But the new a…
 
"Domestically I don't think the Uighur culture will survive." China now acknowledges the existence of mass indoctrination camps in Xinjiang - which it calls 'vocational training centres' - after months of denial. Its latest propaganda campaign showcases Uighurs inside the camps thanking the Party for teaching them skills and saving them from Islami…
 
The language used by the Chinese state in Xinjiang pathologises Islam, seeing it as an "ideological virus" which needs eradication by transformation through education. In recent days, China has publicly justified the mass internment of Uighurs as necessary in its struggle against the "three evils" of terrorism, separatism and religious extremism. I…
 
Louisa Lim explores the booming phenomenon of podcasts with investigative journalist Richard Baker and the ABC’s Rachael Brown.They explore what makes this genre so compelling to audiences, and what does it tell us about ourselves and how far can you push the the story telling.Host details:Louisa Lim has been a journalist for more than two decades.…
 
‘We seem to be normal, but we are not.’ A United Nations human rights panel says it has credible reports that more than a million Uighurs are being held in reeducation camps in the northwestern Chinese province of Xinjiang. As evidence emerges of massive human rights violations from satellite photos, procurement bids and state-run news reports, the…
 
“Use your spies for every kind of business.” This 2500 year-old stratagem from Sun Zi's Art of War still informs Beijing’s modern day approach towards intelligence gathering. Today China’s espionage industrial complex appears to be taking spying mainstream by blurring the boundaries between spying, interference and influence projection. To explore …
 
China today is Black Mirror through the Looking Glass. A national video surveillance network is promised in just two years, while new technologies are being rolled out at speed on the frontier of China’s surveillance regime, in Xinjiang, ranging from iris scans to phone surveillance apps. Simultaneously the Chinese state is building a nationwide so…
 
There’s no escaping China’s Belt and Road Initiative. It’s been written into China’s constitution, and more than 70 countries from Pakistan to Papua New Guinea have signed up. But what is it? A modern-era Marshall Plan, a geopolitical bid for China to build a new international power bloc, a new model for Chinese colonialism, or an all-encompassing …
 
Louisa Lim moderated a lively discussion between Natasha Mitchell, host of the ABC's Science Friction and Robert Smith from Planet Money on NPR. They tackled topics such as their individual approaches to a story, how podcasts are pushing the boundaries of narrative story telling and how much of yourself should you insert into a story?Host details:L…
 
China's recent impressive economic growth has been built largely on massive debt. According to some estimates, in just over a decade China has managed to rack up debt in excess of 300% of its GDP, effectively placing a ticking time-bomb under the world economy. Is China heading for a financial crisis, and if so when? In this episode, Graeme and Lou…
 
Masterclass Episode 12: Manoush Zomorodi on Engagement and Audience InteractionThe smartphone has changed audience interaction forever, and Manoush Zomorodi’s Note to Self is a trailblazer in audience engagement. She talks through extreme engagement,and how she managed to get listeners not just to call in, but to change their lifestyles.Show notes@…
 
On 12 May 2008, a 7.9-magnitude earthquake hit Wenchuan in Sichuan, claiming more than 85,000 lives, many of them schoolchildren whose classrooms collapsed. It was a paradoxical moment of great tragedy and great hope, with a new sense of openness and civil society emerging in the quake's immediate aftermath. A decade on, its legacy has proved much …
 
Universities in Australia have an addiction: overseas student fees. Nearly half of overseas students in Australia are from China, rising to 60% at some institutions. Against the backdrop of new legislation to counter foreign influence, we talk to Chinese students, who find themselves caught in a geopolitical battle—accused by some of acting as ‘spi…
 
You have to love and idea and a topic so much that you want to live it, breath it, eat it and marry it. That’s the advice that Radiotopia’s Julie Shapiro gives for anyone who wants to get into podcasting.Show notes @jatomichttp://www.julieshapiro.org/who/Radiotopiahttps://www.radiotopia.fm/Ear Hustlehttps://www.earhustlesq.com/Millennialhttp://www.…
 
Masterclass Episode 10: Lyse Doucet on Journalism in Hostile EnvironmentsThe job of a journalist is to tell the stories of our time. In this episode, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet talks through the challenges facing today's journalists from the conflict frontlines to the increasing hostility to the mainstream media. Show n…
 
Masterclass Episode 7: Steve Inskeep on Going LiveGoing live is one of the trickiest skills for any audio journalist to master. In this episode, NPR’s Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep draws on his decades behind the mike to outline some of his top strategies for going live. Show notes @nprinskeepMorning Editionhttps://www.npr.org/programs/morning…
 
Sound and silence are the tools of an audio journalist, and their uses – as emphasis, as illustration, as explication or as a chapter break – are manifold. In this episode, the BBC’s Neal Razzell talks through how to make your pieces sing, and how to go one step further with sound. Show notes Neal Razzell 's Twitter - @NealRazzell Spain’s Battle fo…
 
The Communist Party's shadowy United Front Work Department has emerged stronger than ever before after the most recent government reshuffle. This body, whose job has historically been to win hearts and minds among the Party’s opponents, is now also responsible for all work related to ethnic minority groups, religious management and contact with ove…
 
Masterclass Episode 7: Writing for RadioOne of the biggest secrets to writing for radio is not writing for radio, but letting your sound and your interviewees do some of the work. In this episode, Natasha Mitchell of Australian Broadcasting Corporation's (ABC) Radio National walks us through how to show, not always tell, for radio.Show notes Natash…
 
Masterclass Episode 6: The Art of Radio PackagesLearn how to fantasize your ideal piece into reality, as well as how to become an audio hunter who knows exactly what they want and how to get it. In this episode, NPR's Robert Smith decodes the structure of a radio news package, talking through the tricks of the trade, and how to do it all on a tight…
 
Masterclass Episode 5: Recording in the FieldUse your mic like a camera, zooming in and out to getting aural close-ups and wide shots to build texture to your pieces. In this episode, the BBC’s Africa producer Becky Lipscombe talks through how to report in the field including what to take out with you and how to get the sound you need. Show notes B…
 
Masterclass Episode 4: Finding Your VoiceIn audio journalism, you need to sound like yourself plus 10%. But what does that even mean? In this episode, voice coach Elspeth Morrison breaks down how to find your radio voice and use it appropriately. Show notes Elspeth Morrison a voice coach who has worked with journalists for almost twenty years. She …
 
China's preoccupation with cartography now seems to be reaching into classrooms, websites and academic journals around the world, with an increasing number of demands for retractions and apologies for maps that do not comport with Beijing's view of its borders. In this episode, John Zinda, a sociologist from Cornell University, and James Miles, Chi…
 
Masterclass Episode 3: InterviewingInterviewing is like playing chess; you need to predict two moves ahead and have your figurative pieces in play ready to meet your interviewee there. In this episode, the award-winning journalist Hamish Macdonald talks through the art of the interview, and the importance of holding people in power to account. Show…
 
Masterclass Episode 2Finding a Story and Turning It Into RadioIn the words of the British comedy figure Alan Partridge, dead air is a crime. But how to go about finding sparkling interviewees to bring your pieces to life? In this episode, Mike Innes, an output editor for BBC World Service’s daily news programme, Newshour, talks through how to find …
 
China’s aid and growing influence in the South Pacific is causing alarm with an Australian minister recently complaining about Chinese-funded 'roads to nowhere'. In this month's episode, Louisa and Graeme are joined by award winning journalist Jo Chandler to discuss the challenges brought by a wave of Chinese aid and migration to the Pacific’s larg…
 
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