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Malady

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Malady

Blackout Theatre

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Malady is a podcast produced by Blackout Theatre and hosted by Sullivan Forrester, a journalism student. This docudrama follows Sully as she searches for the truth about her family and a curse that haunts them. Is it something in the blood? New episodes every three weeks.
 
This podcast aims to openly discuss a multitude of mental health illnesses with goals to combat the negative response associated with mental illnesses. While the situation has been improving, there is still much that can be done. This podcast also focuses on how the recent Covid-19 pandemic has impacted the general public's mental health.
 
A raunchy, silly, staunchly pro trans rights Harry Potter slander Harry Potter book club podcast. For those who loved Harry Potter as a kid and still do as an adult but it’s complicated now. Always looking for more perspective on the most popular book series of all time, because with great power comes great responsibility.
 
A long-term thinking lecture series from The Long Now Foundation: these hour long talks are recorded live at The Interval, our bar / cafe / museum in San Francisco. Since 02014 this series has presented artists, authors, entrepreneurs, scientists (and more) taking a long-term perspective on subjects like art, design, history, nature, technology, and time. You can learn more about The Interval and this series at theinterval.org, where we have full videos of the talks on this podcast.
 
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Black Feminist & Bookish

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Black Feminist & Bookish

Cafe Con Libros, Bk: An Intersectional Feminist Bookstore & Coffee Shop

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A monthly book club discussion from Cafe Con Libros, an Intersectional Feminist Bookstore and Coffee Shop in Brooklyn. Each month, Kalima DeSuze along with a community member, take a deep dive into the Feminist & Bookish subscription pick. Using an intersectional lens, the peer reflects on pressing themes, key takeaways, and the changing face of Feminism.
 
Introducing the newest addition to Dear Asian Youth! Hosted by Genesis Magpayo, Naina Giri, Abi Lee, and Isabel Leong, Dear Asian Girl is a podcast focused on uplifting, highlighting, and supporting Asian girls everywhere. With the lack of representation amongst Asian girls in social media, it's important that we as Asian girls support one another and bring awareness in order to be at the forefront of this change. For Asian Girls, by Asian Girls
 
Koze avè m is a weekly podcast in which taboo topics -which really should be openly discussed- are debated. Koze avè m is also a platform where the one' story inspires the other. Each story is unique and each story count. Let your story inpire the world !
 
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Authentic Faith

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Authentic Faith

Desmond Outlaw & Dean Defuria

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In day to day life, unexpected things come up at every corner. However, there is only one thing that stays consistent, and that is our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. But he left us one thing, and that is the Word of God, the Bible. Welcome to Authentic Faith, a podcast recorded by Pastor Desmond Outlaw. Every podcast done on Authentic Faith goes through a section of the Bible, going through issues, problems, sins, and blessings that can apply to every person. Each episode is done in easy-to-l ...
 
Bienvenue dans notre série de balados sur le droit de l’emploi au Canada. Chaque épisode de courte durée porte sur un enjeu du droit de l'emploi qui préoccupe actuellement les entreprises au Canada. La série est produite par notre groupe Emploi et travail du bureau de Montréal, au Québec, et s'appuie sur l'expérience de Stikeman Elliott en tant que conseiller juridique de premier plan auprès de clients de toutes les régions du Canada et du monde entier. Cette série est principalement produit ...
 
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Arthur is alive and Harry is a vessel for evil. Email us at restrictedsectionpod@gmail.com to tell us what you thought of St. Mungo's Hospital for Magical Injuries and Maladies or whatever or even what you think of us! We’d love to read your email on the show. Be sure to subscribe to know right away about new episodes, and rate and review! SUPPORT …
 
If you feel unwell today you can pick up a prescription or head to a medical centre, but how did ill people treat their ailments in the Middle Ages? A major new project at Cambridge University Library aims to find out, by digitising, cataloguing and conserving over 180 medieval manuscripts, containing well over 8,000 medical recipes. Dr James Freem…
 
According to historian Dan Stone, popular understanding of the Holocaust, in all of its horror and complexity, is often incomplete or fractured. Speaking with Matt Elton, Dan explores some of the overlooked and misunderstood aspects of the Holocaust, from the scope of international collaboration to the ways its horrors reverberated for decades afte…
 
On 23 January 1978, Baron Édouard-Jean Empain was snatched from the streets of Paris, in an audacious kidnapping attempt. Before long, a ransom of 80 million francs was demanded. And to show they meant business, the kidnappers chopped off the baron’s little finger – with the disturbing warning that more body parts would follow. In conversation with…
 
Imagine an ancient Greek or Roman body, and the first picture that pops into your head is probably made of marble or stone – perhaps an austere bust, or a gleaming, musclebound sculpture, polished, cold and pale. But what about the experience of living in a real body, in all its pleasure, pain and flaws, during antiquity? Speaking with Elinor Evans…
 
In 1946, Churchill declared that “from Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an Iron Curtain has descended across the Continent”. But what exactly did this rhetorical border look like during the Cold War, and what’s happening along it today? Timothy Phillips tells David Musgrove about his experiences travelling the length of the border …
 
In 1917, the Russian Revolution saw scores of Russian aristocrats and artists flee to Paris to escape Bolshevik brutality. Speaking to Matt Elton, Helen Rappaport highlights some of their stories, exploring the dramatic shift in circumstances that many endured, and revealing what the city’s inhabitants made of the new arrivals. (Ad) Helen Rappaport…
 
When was the word “atheist” first used? How dangerous was it to question the existence of God in the Middle Ages? And how successful were communist regimes of the 20th century at stamping out religion? More than 2,000 years since the Greek philosopher Socrates was accused of atheism, Spencer Mizen speaks to Professor Alec Ryrie to answer your top q…
 
Urbanist, researcher and writer Johanna Hoffman joins us to talk about speculative futures -- a powerful set of tools that can reorient urban development help us dream and build more resilient, equitable cities. Navigating modern change depends on imagining futures we’ve never seen. Urban planning and design should be well positioned to spearhead t…
 
When Franklin Delano Roosevelt assumed the presidency of the United States in 1933, he became the head of a nation facing immense hardship and disenchantment amid the Great Depression. No president, except Abraham Lincoln, had come to office in more challenging circumstances, says Iwan Morgan. Speaking to Elinor Evans, he discusses his new biograph…
 
When we think about the first encounters between Europe and the Americas, we’ve traditionally imagined a one-sided story of “Old world” Europeans voyaging to the “New World” of the Americas. But what about the reverse? Caroline Dodds Pennock discusses her book On Savage Shores, which explores the stories of indigenous Americans who journeyed to Eur…
 
It's not a penis joke. Email us at restrictedsectionpod@gmail.com to tell us what you thought of The Eye of the Snake or even what you think of us! We’d love to read your email on the show. Be sure to subscribe to know right away about new episodes, and rate and review! SUPPORT US ON OUR PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/therestrictedsection THANK Y…
 
The Japanese city of Nagasaki is probably best known for being the target of the world’s second-ever nuclear attack in August 1945. Yet the city was also home to hundreds of Allied prisoners of war, forcibly put to work to support the Japanese war economy. In conversation with Spencer Mizen, John Willis shares the incredible – and largely forgotten…
 
With parachuting monkeys, volcanic eruptions and performances of Beethoven’s symphonies, Surrey Zoo was no ordinary Victorian attraction. Dr Joanne Cormac joins Rob Attar to discuss the story of this eye-opening pleasure park, and reveals what the rise of zoos can tell us about science, leisure and empire in the Victorian age. Hosted on Acast. See …
 
What was society’s attitude towards female writers in Regency England? How far did class affect the hopes of young couples looking to be wed? And did people really spend all day gossiping about grand fortunes, illustrious estates and ruinous affairs? Speaking with Lauren Good, Dr Lizzie Rogers answers listener questions on Jane Austen’s England – f…
 
In this 100th Episode of the pod sven chats with Rick Valentin (He/Him) of Poster Children about his song "*He's My Star" off of the 1995 album "Junior Citizen," writing songs with Poster Children, his relationship to creativity, and trying to meet David Hasselhoff at a mall. *Song truncated due to usage rights-- To listen to the full song listen o…
 
In the 19th century, Britain imagined itself as a bastion of beef-eating carnivores. But at a time when meat consumption was taken as a signifier of personal heartiness and national prosperity, a rebel alliance formed – a ragtag group of religious devotees, health enthusiasts, temperance campaigners, animal rights activists, political reformers and…
 
As part of our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Bart Elmore discusses his research into the environmental impacts of global capitalism through history with Helen Carr, from Coca-Cola and plastic use, to pesticides. The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical s…
 
Where has Hagrid been all this time? We finally get to learn... sort of. Email us at restrictedsectionpod@gmail.com to tell us what you thought of Hagrid's Tale or even what you think of us! We’d love to read your email on the show. Be sure to subscribe to know right away about new episodes, and rate and review! SUPPORT US ON OUR PATREON: https://w…
 
For millennia, humans have cut down trees to create buildings, ships, tools, weapons and everyday objects we still use around the home. Author and archaeologist Max Adams tells Jon Bauckham what studying this most resilient of materials can teach us about the history of our species. (Ad) Max Adams is the author of The Museum of the Wood Age (Head o…
 
In Hitler’s Germany, what you ate was not a personal matter – sacrificing luxury was a way for German citizens to demonstrate their patriotism, while hunger was weaponised as a tool of war and oppression in occupied territories. Historian Lisa Pine explains to Ellie Cawthorne why the Nazis were so eager to control the nation’s diet, and explores th…
 
Ever wonder how velcro was invented? By a couple of Vulcans in Pennsylvania. For this Trekkin’ into the New Year, we’re starting off with episode two of season two of Enterprise, Carbon Creek. Also starting off the month is Ruk’s newest solo project, Why You Should, in which he convinces the Rage why he needs to watch Jujutsu Kaisen. If you need a …
 
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