show episodes
 
The field of migration and mobility studies is vast and has grown exponentially over the past decades. At the same time, migration and fears of the foreign dominate public discourse around the world. To make sense of the movement of people, this podcast explores the latest in migration and mobility research globally. Providing a platform for migration scholars to speak about their projects, ideas and insights, The IMISCOE Migration Podcast aims to publicize and render more accessible what ha ...
 
For several decades, researchers based at the University of Oxford have been addressing one of the most compelling human stories; why and how people move. Combining the expertise of the Centre on Migration Policy and Society, the Refugee Studies Centre, Border Criminologies in the Department of Law, the Transport Studies Unit in the School of Geography and the Environment, and scholars working on migration and mobility from across divisions and departments, the University has one the largest ...
 
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ReSearching Diversity

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ReSearching Diversity

Jana Vietze, Sabrina Alhanachi, Miriam Schwarzenthal, Sharleen Pevec, Tuğçe Aral, Zeynep Demir

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Join a group of six women in social sciences in their aim to increase visibility of inspiring social scientists and of cutting-edge research on ethnic, cultural, and migration-related diversity. Each episode, two hosts invite one outstanding scientist to discuss their PAST (personal path into academia), the PRESENT (research article or book chapter that has recently inspired them), and the FUTURE (recent developments and paradigm shifts in academia and social sciences). For more information ...
 
Industry veterans Gina Trapani and Chris LoSacco chat with their friends and team about technology, business, and leadership. Decades of experience inform their insightful discussions about what digital transformation really means. Created by Postlight, the digital strategy, product, design, and engineering firm they lead in New York City.
 
Did you come to the US in search of a better life and find yourself slogging in a job where other people control your financial future and, more importantly, your lives? Saket Jain, the host of the Migrate 2 Wealth podcast, has identified ways to invest in real estate and other asset classes that can generate passive income without you having to be involved. While leading a successful upward career in tech, he has utilized these investments to not only successfully build financial freedom fo ...
 
Peter Rozsy is a Registered Australian Migration Agent who provides expert advice to individuals and families who wish to relocate or settle in Australia. Peter Rozsy offers various kinds of services such as Family Visas, Business & Investment Visas, Working & Skilled Visas, and Study Visas.
 
Exploring the biggest questions of our time with the help of the world's greatest thinkers. Host Manoush Zomorodi inspires us to learn more about the world, our communities, and most importantly, ourselves. Get more brainy miscellany with TED Radio Hour+. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/ted
 
Led by Ricardo Hausmann, the Growth Lab at Harvard's Center for International Development works to understand the dynamics of growth and to translate those insights into more effective policymaking in developing countries. The Growth Lab places increased economic diversity and complexity at the center of the development story and uncovers how countries move into industries that offer increased productivity.
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is. New episodes come out Thursdays for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers. Listen ad-free on Wondery+ or ...
 
Migration Conversations is a podcast that invites persons to share their migration stories. Hosted by Professor Jamie Liew, each episode is an in-depth conversation with people who have experienced the Canadian immigration system or other migration regimes up close. We talk to migrants, immigrants, lawyers, policy makers, advocates and experts. We hope that these conversations shed light on the challenges migrants face through their own voices. Please note this podcast is not legal advice.
 
The Bridge is a podcast focusing on building bridges between the East and the West. The show goes beyond the headlines to the lifelines, with conversations that inform, entertain and inspire listeners from the opposites of the world.
 
Since MPI’s founding in 2001, much has changed in the world of migration and integration policy. Societies have become more polarized, with immigration often used as a wedge issue; migration management has become more complex; 9/11 and other terrorist attacks changed the immigration frame to one with an overwhelming national security focus; humanitarian protection needs have reached record levels; and climate change has emerging as a growing consideration in relation to human movement. What ...
 
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show series
 
How cost segregation works The power of bonus depreciation Property types that are eligible for a cost segregation A high-level overview of the CSSI’s process Why it’s vital to find balance in your career and lifestyle Resources/Links Mentioned In This Episode Cost Segregation Services Incorporated Internal Revenue Service About Mark Gross Mark is …
 
Our guest today is Viktoria Sereda, a Ukrainian scholar whose research expertise straddles the formation of sociopolitical identity, cross-regional mobility, as well as internal and international displacement of Ukrainians following the Russian annexation of Crimea in 2014.Our associate producer, Asya Pisarevskaya, speaks with Viktoria about resear…
 
Frank Wolff's ground-breaking Yiddish Revolutionaries in Migration: The Transnational History of the Jewish Labour Bund (Haymarket Books, 2021) investigates how this social movement transformed itself from one of the most important revolutionary protagonists in early twentieth-century Russia to a socialist institution of secular Jewish life and yid…
 
With the return of unfettered traveling within China, train and plane tickets are selling out faster than in years prior. Returning to one's hometown dominates discussions. Expectation of fireworks, dragon dances, and the CCTV Spring Festival Gala loom large. We are joined by Rick Fakhre of the US and Maurice of Hong Kong to discuss and delineate t…
 
We discuss the role of data science in migration studies, joined by Dr. Emre Korkmaz, lecturer in migration and co-author of Data Science for Migration and Mobility and Christina Pao, PhD student and co-organiser of the Measuring Migration Conference 2022 In this episode of The Migration Oxford Podcast, we are discussing the role of data science in…
 
Early Migration To North America Likely Wasn’t A One-Way Road The story of how early humans migrated to North America might not be as simple as we once thought. The prevailing theory was that ancient peoples traveled from Siberia to modern-day Alaska using the Bering strait as a land bridge. But new genomic research, published in Current Biology, r…
 
Art has a long history of engaging with conflict and violence. From the antiquities, through Goya, to Guernica, our museums are filled with depictions of battles, pogroms, uprisings, and their suppression. Not all of these stories are told from the perspective of the victors. Many contemporary creatives have continued this tradition. While the posi…
 
In Wild Music: Sound and Sovereignty in Ukraine (Wesleyan UP, 2019), Maria Sonevytsky tracks vernacular Ukrainian discourses of “wildness” as they manifested in popular music during a volatile decade of Ukrainian political history bracketed by two revolutions. From the Eurovision Song Contest to reality TV, from Indigenous radio to the revolution s…
 
Beginning with the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry in spring 1951 and ending with its reversal following the overthrow of Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddeq in August 1953, the Iranian oil crisis was a crucial turning point in the global Cold War. The nationalization challenged Great Britain's preeminence in the Middle East and threatened…
 
Irish vegan studies are poised for increasing relevance as climate change threatens the legitimacy and longevity of animal agriculture and widespread health problems related to animal product consumption disrupt long held nutritional ideologies. Already a top producer of greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union, Ireland has committed to expan…
 
Microchips are both important and in short supply. So how important? And what can be done to make them more plentiful? Also, what are the geopolitical implications of having the production of microchips concentrated in relatively few hands. Owen Bennett Jones talks microchips with Julian Kamasa of the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich. Owen Ben…
 
In Wild Music: Sound and Sovereignty in Ukraine (Wesleyan UP, 2019), Maria Sonevytsky tracks vernacular Ukrainian discourses of “wildness” as they manifested in popular music during a volatile decade of Ukrainian political history bracketed by two revolutions. From the Eurovision Song Contest to reality TV, from Indigenous radio to the revolution s…
 
The China Nexus: Thirty Years In and Around the Chinese Communist Party's Tyranny (Optimum Publishing, 2022) brings together Benedict Rogers' 30 years of advocacy, research and work in and around China. Opening with his rollicking adventures as an 18 year old teaching English in Qingdao in 1992, the human element of this monograph, the real people …
 
The Holocaust in Romania: The Destruction of Jews and Roma Under the Antonescu Regime, 1940-1944 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2022), Radu Ioanid explores in great detail the physical destruction of Romania's Jewish and Roma communities, including the pogroms of Bucharest and Iaşi as well as the deportations and the massacres from Bessarabia, Bukovina, an…
 
In Soundworks: Race, Sound, and Poetry in Production (Duke UP, 2020), Anthony Reed argues that studying sound requires conceiving it as process and as work. Since the long Black Arts era (ca. 1958–1974), intellectuals, poets, and musicians have defined black sound as radical aesthetic practice. Through their recorded collaborations as well as the a…
 
Linking morality and science can conjure up disturbing histories around social Darwinism, eugenics, and genetically engineered humans. But scientists today are making discoveries that moral agents shouldn’t ignore: how to overcome aggression and tribalism, and how to sustain cooperation in a modern pluralist world. Guests: Diane Paul, professor eme…
 
Jesuit Colleges and Universities in the United States: A History (Catholic University of America Press, 2022) provides a comprehensive history of Jesuit higher education in the United States, weaving together the stories of the fifty-four colleges and universities that the Jesuits have operated (successfully and unsuccessfully) since 1789. It empha…
 
Philip Scranton, University Board of Governors Professor Emeritus of the history of industry and technology at Rutgers University-Camden, talks about his book, Business Practice In Socialist Hungary, Volume 1: Creating The Theft Economy, 1945-1957, with Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel. Scranton’s book examines how leaders in socialist Hungary plan…
 
The Vulgarity of Caste: Dalits, Sexuality, and Humanity in Modern India (Stanford UP, 2022) offers the first social and intellectual history of Dalit performance of Tamasha—a popular form of public, secular, traveling theater in Maharashtra—and places Dalit Tamasha women who represented the desire and disgust of the patriarchal society at the heart…
 
From Lawrence of Arabia to Star Wars via tales of intrepid adventurers traversing lonely sandswept landscapes, deserts have always had a powerful pull on the popular imagination.But if a desert is full of sand, where did all that sand come from in the first place? That’s what CrowdScience listener Andy wants to know, so presenter Caroline Steel hea…
 
Meet The Blind Birder Reimagining Accessibility In The Outdoors For many blind and low vision people, accessing outdoor spaces like parks can be challenging. Trails are often unsafe or difficult to navigate, signs don’t usually have Braille, guides generally aren’t trained to help disabled visitors, and so on. But nature recordist Juan Pablo Culass…
 
What’s Behind The Strange Slowing Of The Earth’s Core? Even though some days feel more chaotic than others, the rotation of the surface of the planet proceeds at a pretty constant rate—about one full rotation every 24 hours. But the rotational speed of the inner core is less stable, and has been known to shift over time. Now, researchers are report…
 
Authorities confirm they’re investigating possible wage theft and health and safety violations at the two farms in Half Moon Bay where seven farm workers were killed this week in a mass shooting. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Even as the community mourns in Half Moon Bay, people are looking for ways to heal and grasp for normalcy. Reporter…
 
Political editor Katharine Murphy speaks to the treasurer, Jim Chalmers, about the objectives of a ‘values-based capitalism’ that strengthens democracy, ahead of his upcoming essay for The Monthly. He also responds to this week’s inflation figures and reveals an intention to address entrenched disadvantage in the May budget…
 
Since 2020, Europe's financial sector has been severely stress-tested by a global pandemic and a major land war yet, compared to the period between 2007 and 2012, the impact has been remarkably muted. Still minnows compared to their US peers, Europe's post-crisis recapitalised banks nevertheless have held up well. And so, by and large, has the qual…
 
With In and Out of This World: Material and Extraterrestrial Bodies in the Nation of Islam (Duke University Press, 2022), Stephen C. Finley, Inaugural Chair, Department of African and African American Studies at Louisiana State University, examines the religious practices and discourses that have shaped the Nation of Islam (NOI) in America. Drawing…
 
Linking morality and science can conjure up disturbing histories around social Darwinism, eugenics, and genetically engineered humans. But scientists today are making discoveries that moral agents shouldn’t ignore: how to overcome aggression and tribalism, and how to sustain cooperation in a modern pluralist world. Guests: Diane Paul, professor eme…
 
For generations, the composition and recitation of poetry has been a key mode of expression among Bedouin populations in the Middle East, reflecting social norms, religious practices, relationships with the natural environment, and tribal histories and politics. In Words Like Daggers: The Political Poetry of the Negev Bedouin (Brill, 2022), Kobi Pe…
 
In her detailed cultural history of technological change, Electrifying Mexico, Diana Montaño argues that ordinary Mexicans became electrifying agents who actively negotiated the extent and manner electricity entered their lives and lived spaces in Mexico City. An Assistant Professor of History at Washington University in St. Louis, Dr. Montaño's te…
 
Since 2016, and with the blessing of Pope Francis, Father Jim Martin has been talking with LGBT Catholics about their relationship with their church. That’s the subject of his book, Building a Bridge, and also a documentary film by the same title; we talk about what the bridge is and where it might take us. He also reflects on his vocation as a Jes…
 
Habitual drug use in the United States is at least as old as the nation itself. Elizabeth Kelly Gray's book Habit Forming: Drug Addiction in America, 1776-1914 (Oxford UP, 2023) traces the history of unregulated drug use and dependency before 1914, when the Harrison Narcotic Tax Act limited sales of opiates and cocaine under US law. Many Americans …
 
What does it mean to be Black in Scotland today? How are notions of nationhood, Scottishness, and Britishness implicated in this? Why is it important to archive and understand Black Scottish history? In Black Oot Here: Black Lives in Scotland (Bloomsbury, 2022) Dr. Francesca Sobande and layla-roxanne hill explore the history and contemporary lives …
 
In the age of social media, athletes have a powerful influence like never before. Many Black athletes have used that power in positive ways, galvanizing their platforms to create impactful educational opportunities, donate to Black social causes, and raise political awareness on important issues. In The Black Athlete Revolt: The Sport Justice Movem…
 
China re-opened border in a final farewell to its strict zero-COVID policy on the 8th of January, 2023. But in the first few weeks of January, the Myanmar side of the border and the Myanmar immigration authorities refused to open the border for fear of COVID surge. This has continued to affect the livelihood of Myanmar jewellers who used to travel …
 
The Aryan Jesus: Christian Theologians and the Bible in Nazi Germany (Princeton UP, 2010) documents the process, and relative ease, with which institutions of higher learning and the religious establishment, can be corrupted by political ideology and power. In Germany of the 1930’s the thin cloak of religion covered and sanitized the murderous evil…
 
Maimonideanism, the intellectual culture inspired by Maimonides’ writings, has received much recent attention. Yet a central aspect of Maimonideanism has been overlooked: the formal reception of the Guide of the Perplexed through commentary. In Rewriting Maimonides: Early Commentaries on the Guide of the Perplexed (de Gruyter, 2018), Igor H. De Sou…
 
As a HMRC boss says there are “no penalties for innocent errors”, Adam and Chris talk through the latest with Nadhim Zahawi’s tax affairs.They’re joined by shadow foreign secretary David Lammy, who sets out Labour’s view on the UK’s relationship with Europe.And Dame Arlene Foster, former first minister of Northern Ireland, talks about breaking the …
 
The man accused of gunning down eight people in Half Moon Bay, killing seven, was charged with seven counts of murder and one count of attempted murder on Wednesday. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED Authorities investigating the mass shooting in Half Moon say the evidence points to it as an incident of “workplace violence.” Acts of violence are a leadi…
 
Why do PhD programs assume students will become professors, when most people find careers outside academia? How can we better prepare graduate students for the post-grad career path? This episode explores: What a “Connected PhD” program is, and why it’s necessary. The negative impact on students when they feel "less than" or as if they have failed …
 
Today I talked to Batja Mesquita about her book Between Us: How Cultures Create Emotions (Norton, 2022). To a degree sometimes not realized, we discuss emotions through the lens of what have been called WEIRD cultures, i.e. Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic. As a result, the perspective taken tends to be inside/out, privileging…
 
For almost a year now, we have been absorbing news and information about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. There are a variety of different, or competing, narratives to explain and define what we understand about the origins of this conflict and the ongoing military successes and failures on the ground in Ukraine and in Russia. I had the chance to inte…
 
In Opening Kailasanatha: The Temple in Kanchipuram Revealed in Time and Space (U Washington Press, 2020), Padma Kaimal deciphers the intentions of the monument’s makers, reaching back across centuries to illuminate worldviews of the ancient Indic south. By focusing on the material form of the complex—the architecture, inscriptions, and sculptures, …
 
David Geisser was a Swiss Guard protecting Pope Francis and the Apostolic Palace between 2013 and 2015. He was following the footsteps of his father who had been in the service a generation earlier under Pope John Paul II, including on the dark day (May 13, 1981) when a would-be assassin shot the Holy Father. I ask him about his experiences in one …
 
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