Best Ngaanyatjarra podcasts we could find (Updated March 2019)
Related podcasts: Society Radiongm Ngmedia Mamu Aboriginalstories Ghoststories Indigenous Ghost Travel Kids and Family Australian  
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Word Up - ABC RN
Weekly
 
Word Up shares the diverse languages of black Australia from Anmatyerre to Arrernte, from Bidjara to Bundjalung, from Nyungar to Ngaanyatjarra, from Yankunytjatjara to Yorta Yorta—one word at a time.
 
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NG Media Podcasts
Daily
 
These podcasts contain a collection of Aboriginal ghost /mamu stories from across the Ngaanyatjarra Lands in Western Australia. Some are traditional stories....some are real-life stories... Listen up! But don't get too scared... Also included is a wonderful collection of stories from the Ngaanyatjarra Dreaming series that share what life is like for the people of the Ngaanyatjaara Lands and how traditional culture still plays a big part in everyday life. Stories are recorded in Australian In ...
 
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Merv Johnson is a Gooreng Gooreng elder who was raised on the fringes of Bundaberg.
 
Rona Glynn-McDonald shares a Kaytetye phrase that was important to her while she was away at boarding school.
 
The terms to describe kinship and degrees of relationship are a complex domain in Indigenous languages.
 
Dhunghutti man Ray Kelly Snr is passionate about studying Goori languages in the space where community knowledge and academia cross over.
 
For the 100th episode of Word Up Sheree Blackley shares some of her favourite Kalkutungu words.
 
The first Gunggari word Aunty Lynette Nixon ever learnt was 'yambah' which means home.
 
Indigenous place names can unlock the history and cultural meaning of a certain place.
 
Did you know you’re speaking an Indigenous language when you say many Australian place names?
 
In the Kaalamaya language, a panoramic view incorporates every living thing.
 
Leonora Adidi shares three 'kapu' words from Kala Kawaw Ya.
 
In central Australia there are five regional dialects of Arrernte. Joel Liddle speaks Ikngerripenhe or Eastern Arrernte - his grandmother's language.
 
From terms of endearment to a coming of age ceremony for girls - we look back on some words that celebrate the women in our communities.
 
From Bickerton Island in the north to Port Lincoln in the south we look back at a few words that celebrate the role women play in our communities.
 
There's a word in Wajarri which translates to "long time" - but it can mean two very different things depending on the context.
 
There are five dialects in the Anaiwan language. One of them is Ambeyan.
 
There is a word in Nyikina that describes the beginning of time.
 
Georgina Trevorrow is a 'Deadly Nanna' from Murray Bridge.
 
The AFL legend shares some Kokatha language including two very familiar cross-over words.
 
We often hear about languages dying - but what about language birth?
 
For Uncle Vic Chapman, Yuwaalaraay language is infused with memory.
 
Ngunnawal man Paul House explains the origin of an Australian colloquialism for "sheep".
 
Ngarluma is a language but it's also a word that describes a relationship to country.
 
The Ngalia word for respect is often mistranslated as shame. Kado Muir explains why.
 
Arabana language lessons are a family affair for sisters Annalise and Ambah Kowcan.
 
Language teacher and broadcaster Marion Cheedy loves to say the Yindjibarndi word for respect.
 
Some of the languages spoken along the Bundian Way - from Kosciuszko to the coast - include Monero, Ngarigu, Yuin and Dhurga.
 
The Anmatyerre word for learning inspires translator Dean Briscoe.
 
Nukunu is a heritage language - one without fluent speakers. But that doesn't mean it's not being spoken.
 
Pertame is one of a family of languages spoken across central Australia.
 
Tiwi is the language of the islands where the Arafura Sea meets the Timor Sea.
 
Arrernte is a family of languages from central Australia.
 
Bilawara Lee hopes that one day Larrakia will be spoken fluently on the streets of Darwin.
 
Australia's first Children's Laureate shares the name of a sacred waterhole on Gunggandji country in far north Queensland.
 
Cherissma Blackman shares the Yidinji story of how the Great Barrier Reef was created
 
As the only fluent Badimaya speaker Ollie George has been working to preserve the language for future generations.
 
After being removed from her family, Rhonda picked up what languages she could on the mission - including words in her father's language, Nhanda.
 
From terms of endearment to a coming of age ceremony for girls - we look back on some words that celebrate the women in our communities.
 
From Bickerton Island in the north to Port Lincoln in the south we look back at a few words that celebrate the role women play in our communities.
 
Awabakal man Ray Kelly Jr is hot on the heels of his dad Ray Kelly Sr in the field of language revival.
 
Ruth James has been relearning her grandparents' language of Yugarabul - along with her granddaughter.
 
palawa kani is the traditional language of Tasmania.
 
Kaytej and Pintupi are just two of the languages spoken in central Australia - a linguistically diverse part of the continent.
 
Leonora Adidi shares three 'kapu' words from Kala Kawaw Ya.
 
In central Australia there are five regional dialects of Arrernte. Joel Liddle speaks Ikngerripenhe or Eastern Arrernte - his grandmother's language.
 
Trent White teaches us about a game Darumbal men would play using a stone axe and diamonds drawn on the trunks of trees.
 
His grandfather taught this Budjiti elder the language name for a medicine plant that was good for a cough - but not a boxed ear.
 
Aunty Phyllis Williams shares some of her favourite affirmations in Ngarrindjeri.
 
Teaching Gathang allows Rhonda to deepen her knowledge of language and the way culture wraps around it.
 
The wild flowers and sand dunes of her Walmajarri country in north-western Western Australia inspire Annette Kogolo.
 
Learning and teaching Wakka Wakka language is a family affair for Annalee Pope.
 
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