Nicolas Ting public
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“Our big mission and vision is to make sure that any data that can be used to cure these diseases is actually used. And we do that by connecting as much data as possible - as many types from as many different sources as we can find.” In this week's episode of The G Word, Chris is joined by Dr Maria Chatzou Dunford, CEO and Co-Founder of Lifebit and…
 
“We need some more conceptual clarity around ancestry so that we can build up some recommendations on how it should be used in genomic research. There have been a lot of previous recommendations, around the use of race, ethnicity and ancestry in genetic research, but most don’t say much about ancestry. I think that it's fitting to get more of a con…
 
“It’s incredibly important that we build up reference data sets in other worldwide populations so that we can learn more about the ancestry of people.” On today’s episode of The G Word, James Cook, one of our Bioinformaticians in Research Services at Genomics England, is joined by Dr Garrett Hellenthal, a Sir Henry Dale Fellow working on constructi…
 
“[Sophia at Genomics England] is trying to design new ways to get people of different backgrounds to understand what the database is, donate, and ensure that the data gets used.” Joining us on today’s episode of The G Word is Sophia Luu’s family, interviewed by Sophia Luu herself, our Design Researcher on the Diverse Data Programme. She is joined b…
 
“Do diverse populations in genomic research help to facilitate new understanding? We are all one population, we should all have equal rights. The challenges are significant but they are not unsurmountable.” In the second episode of our Diverse Data Week podcast series, Diksha Srivastava, our Implementation Lead in the Diverse Data Team, is joined b…
 
“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. I believe we have made that step and that they are now becoming large strides.” In this first episode, Dr Maxine Mackintosh, our Diverse Data Programme lead, speaks to Primrose Granville, an award-winning broadcaster, kidney recipient and community health campaigner leading a Black Heath Matter…
 
“We need to have these open and honest conversations with patients, because otherwise where is the duty of care? We're failing patients if we’re not being honest with them and saying, ‘there’s no evidence of disease at the moment, we believe that we've done everything that we can to make sure that the cancer doesn't come back, but unfortunately aro…
 
“To be doing something with rare diseases is, for me, an absolute pleasure and a joy because there are too many people in this country who are still looking for a diagnosis and we’re doing something to help.” In this week’s episode of The G Word, our Chief Executive Officer, Chris Wigley, is joined by Baroness Blackwood, member of the Lords Science…
 
“Speaking as someone who's spent most of my career in Pharma, I know how important data is to bringing medicines to market, and to understand; where does the patient need a new treatment? How can that be targeted? How can discovery be pulled together so that you can actually give that patient a drug that's effective and safe?” In this week’s episod…
 
“What Findacure does is try to promote this concept of drug repurposing, and all the issues around there. That is another area of hope for rare diseases.” In this week’s episode of The G Word #sciencepodcast, our Chief Executive Officer, Chris Wigley, is joined by Dr Nick Sireau, the CEO and Chairman of the AKU Society and Co-founder and Chairman o…
 
“We have a wild card here that is changing the risk-benefit equation for all babies in order to detect these rare cases.” In this week’s episode of The G Word #sciencepodcast, our Chief Executive Officer, Chris Wigley, is joined by Dr Robert Green, Professor of Medicine (Genetics) at Harvard Medical School and a physician-scientist who directs the …
 
“It’s extremely exciting from a research point of view because this really does offer that holistic view of the patient. […] The long-read sequencing technology and the activity that we’re doing with this multimodal data is really cutting-edge, it’s moving research forward, because we want to have a better experience for the patient and ensure they…
 
Står du overfor nogle svære valg, hvor du er i tvivl om, hvad du skal vælge? Det kan være alle valg, som kommer til at have indflydelse på dit liv. Er du i tvivl om, du skal konfirmeres, købe en hund, starte din egen virksomhed eller noget helt andet. Alle svære/store valg, som I står overfor, prøver vi at svare på i podcast episoden af ”Tobias og …
 
Står du overfor nogle svære valg, hvor du er i tvivl om, hvad du skal vælge? Det kan være alle valg, som kommer til at have indflydelse på dit liv. Er du i tvivl om, du skal konfirmeres, købe en hund, starte din egen virksomhed eller noget helt andet. Alle svære/store valg, som I står overfor, prøver vi at svare på i podcast episoden af ”Tobias og …
 
“What I found about genetic counselling was that whilst you might learn about the science or the condition or inheritance patterns - things that may stay constant - depending on who you're seeing, the families that are coming in to see you or the patients that are coming in to see you will all have a different story.” In this week’s episode of The …
 
“We're just at the cusp of the genetic therapeutics revolution, which I think will continue to sweep medicine for the next 15 to 20 years and will completely fundamentally change the way we think about treating all kinds of diseases.” In this week’s episode of The G Word #sciencepodcast, our CEO Chris Wigley is joined by Prof Sir John Bell, Regius …
 
“I'm a great believer in ‘if you can see it, then you can be it’. So I wanted to really provide a role model for young women in STEM, because I feel like there's not a lot of representation for working class young women in science. I wanted young people to look at me and say ‘she’s from a working-class background and she’s got a strong scouse accen…
 
“In most countries where there's large scale funding, ethnic minority populations are, by definition, minorities. And so in order to collect enough ethnic minority data in the given healthcare system, you really have to oversample those people. And in order to do that you need to have good public engagement programmes to persuade them to participat…
 
“The place where the genome has really had this massive impact over the last decade has been in rare disease, and in particular patients with undiagnosed disease. They are on these medical odysseys, often for years and years, going from doctor to doctor just accumulating emotional and financial burden without answers. The genome is such a powerful …
 
“Let's take a pause and think about what we know from history about health and social inequalities, and what the technology is doing to that. Is it making it better for some people? Is it making it worse?” In this week’s episode of The G Word #sciencepodcast, Rich Scott is joined by Dr Mavis Machirori. Senior Researcher at the Ada Lovelace Institut…
 
“Since 1953, when DNA was discovered by Watson and Crick and supported by Franklin, the NHS had already been focusing on genetic diseases. From the 1960’s, NHS genetic labs were born. Since that time, with the initiation of the Human Genome Project, we got to understand that it was possible to sequence all 3 billion + letters - A, C, G, A T - a hum…
 
"Within the wider framework of personalised medicine, trying to identify treatments, diagnosis, prognosis, that is about a personalised individual. Genomics plays a really important role because our genomes are unique. Bioinformatics is there to try to identify how those genomes are unique and what they tell us about the consequences of those diffe…
 
“It's not the number of genes that matter, it's how you use them - quite literally how you switch them on and off. There's a lot of complexity in the human genome, not in the types of genes, the building blocks, the types of Lego, but how you put that Lego together inside each cell, which genes are on and which are off. And, you know, it's still un…
 
“Public dialogue allows citizens, people, members of the public, people like you and me, and broader than that, to come together, to learn about an issue, to talk with specialists in that issue, to engage with each other in that space, and to consider a whole range of diverse perspectives.” In this week’s episode of The G Word, our CEO Chris Wigley…
 
“Why wouldn't we, as a society, seriously start debating the earliest appropriate age where we should start using genomics, not only for treatment and diagnosis, but also for prevention and facilitating earlier detection? Maybe for some it's 18, maybe for others it's childhood - but these are the sorts of questions that we should be debating.” In t…
 
“I see a future where people's whole genome will be known at a very early stage in their life, and we will be able to look at social factors and health inequalities and target help and support earlier for those in greater need. There will be huge logistical challenges, of course, but this technology isn't going away, this is here. It's how we apply…
 
“Most of the genome is the same for everyone, but there are some places where you can have some variation. This variation, in this case between the people who had severe COVID-19 and the general population, highlights certain areas of the genome. Our job is to try to understand this region.” In this week’s episode of The G Word #sciencepodcast, our…
 
“It's a real power of some of the translational research that's being done that you can not only answer interesting, fundamental biological questions, but also impact people directly in the process.” In this week’s episode of The G Word, our CEO Chris Wigley is joined by Dr Patrick Short, genomic researcher, bioinformatician and Co-Founder and CEO …
 
“What can machine learning do? You know, it's like having a million interns. It's not they can do everything that your core business needs to be able to do, but there are some things they can do very well. And if you can have a million of them, then there are things you can achieve that would be almost impossible to achieve with human scale, with n…
 
“Rare disease families really understand that data is important. Examining the family's genetics and bringing together groups of people with individual rare diseases to examine their genetics, and try and understand what's going on, has the potential to lead to both diagnosis and potential treatments. So they understand the power of data.” In this …
 
“The news media can do a lot better. Frankly, we need to reflect and represent different communities, and produce material that is more relevant to people who don't necessarily come from privileged backgrounds. Because I think that the way to engage people is to tell stories that have relevance to their lives, rather than this paternalistic ‘we spe…
 
“The human element is going to become increasingly important. In the presence of high-level technologies, machine learned algorithms and highly personalised precision medicine - perhaps based on genomics - in the presence, even, of all those items, it will be the contact between care delivery and the care receiver that will remain important.” In th…
 
“Today we still have a significant number of people who are suffering ill health in later life, and often suffering it because we're diagnosing conditions led to them. We’re getting to people and treating them when they end up with things like stage three or four cancer or dementias; we only pick them up at the point when they start to be clinicall…
 
“If we wrap our missions around the patient and have early connections with them, I believe the data packages we pass on to those developing a product will be much richer, and diagnostic development may be much shorter - 2-3 years rather than 25 years.” This week on The G Word, Chris Wigley is joined by Dr Melanie Lee, CEO of medical research chari…
 
"How do we climb the ladder, from the participant representation side? How do we demonstrate that we are partners who would be worth working with, from the view of those in power? And whose ladder is it anyway?" In this week's episode of The G Word, Chris Wigley is joined by Jillian Hastings Ward, who is Chair of the Genomics England Participant Pa…
 
“In us and on us, we have our microbiome, which is more cells - bacterial, viral, and everything - than the number of human cells. And they're our friends. They’re like a garden, we've got to plant them properly. We need to be starting to look at those much more, and genomics is going to play a key role.” In this week’s episode of The G word, Chris…
 
“Today, where we are in the 21st century, genetics, anthropology and evolutionary biology are no ally to racists. In fact, they should be used as weapons against bigotry.” In this week’s episode of The G Word, Chris Wigley is joined by Adam Rutherford, geneticist, author and broadcaster. Adam has produced several documentaries and books on genetics…
 
"At first, it's all a big whirlwind and you can't process the big bombshell that you've been given. Suddenly, it turns out the life you had mapped out is not going to be like that at all. Almost overnight, you become a geneticist, you become a physiotherapist, you become a nurse, you become a dietitian. You are now the expert." Shelley is mum to Fr…
 
"We have accept that things are going to come along in our field that are going to make us feel uncomfortable, and they're going to stretch us. And we shouldn't be frightened of that." Using his experience from his days working at the Ministry of Sound, Lord Bethell is keen to mobilise impact in the genetics and genomics world as quickly, and as eq…
 
"Here we have a condition that has been known medically for hundreds of years, people have received Nobel Prizes for their analysis and understanding of its genetic makeup. Given what is known about sickle cell, genomic research into treatments and cures should be amongst the low hanging fruit within the scientific development." John James, CEO of …
 
"Data is quite a technical topic. It's quite dry. One workshop participant said, 'Oh, you say the word data and I fall asleep.' Engagement needs to be about what matters to people, the benefits to people." Dr Natalie Banner is an expert on the power of data, and uses her knowledge and experience to guide decision-makers and ultimately make health d…
 
“This is about developing a balance between quantitative and qualitative perspective, it isn't just about the data - the data is important, of course it is - but it's also the lived patient experience. Both are key.” In this week’s episode of The G Word, Chris Wigley is joined by Dave McCormick, who has been a member of the Genomics England Partici…
 
"A person's experience can actually alter our genetic material and have it passed on. So what could some of those alterations be, that children can inherit, and for generations after that?" Professor Ting Wu is a molecular biologist with a passion for genetics, space and education. Unravelling the mystery of genes could lead us to understanding wha…
 
"Humans are fantastically complicated, with 37 trillion cells and we don’t even know how many different cell types there are. But’s there’s a place to build from now. Having AlphaFold is like having a Rosetta Stone to translate; you couldn’t read the language of proteins - sequence defining structure and function - before." Tim Hubbard is a Profess…
 
"I would like genomics to be more spoken about. There's still a concern that genomics is going to be used to get rid of certain types of disorders, but it has an enormous potential to make everyone's lives better. Understanding genomics is a really important thing." Driven by his infant daughter's rare form of epilepsy, Charlie established an inter…
 
"Giving people the confidence and capabilities to use data to find insights that can then improve lives is absolutely central to what we need to do over the years to come." Chris spoke to Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, at the end of 2020, reflecting on the UK's response to the COVID-19 pandemic so far and discussing ho…
 
"What is a good deal for both sides? This isn't about science taking from people. This is about science genuinely offering a partnership." How do we engage people in science and trickier subjects like genomics? Professor Anna Middleton is a social scientist and genetic counsellor. In this episode, Chris and Anna explore ways to springboard genomics…
 
"Since the beginning of the outbreak, we've had literally hundreds of drugs on the table available to us that will target the immune system, to try to stop lung damage and COVID. And really, very little hard evidence on which to base the decision about which one to use next, and genetics really does lead us." Doing one of the most important jobs du…
 
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