show episodes
 
“Pod Save America” cohost Tommy Vietor thought foreign policy was boring and complicated until he got the education of a lifetime working for President Obama’s National Security Council. On “Pod Save the World,” he and former deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes break down the latest developments and bring you behind the scenes with the people who were there. New episodes every Wednesday.
 
Stratfor's podcast focused on geopolitics, world affairs, national security, economics and other underlying, global trends that drive the international system. As the world’s leading geopolitical intelligence platform, Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment.
 
Since 2010 Media Roots Radio has been a non-partisan, radical political podcast focusing on foreign policy, the police state and social issues hosted by former Breaking the Set (RT) host & journalist Abby Martin and co-hosted by her brother & filmmaker (A Very Heavy Agenda) Robbie Martin. Conversational, controversial and at times passionate and explicit, Media Roots stands apart from the majority of podcasts coming from a similar political pov. Patreon: www.patreon.com/mediarootsradio
 
This is Bombshell, a bi-weekly podcast coming to you from Washington insiders to dissect today’s foreign policy crises and tomorrow’s security challenges. We’ll talk military strategy, White House mayhem, and the best cocktails known to (wo)man. Brought to you by War on the Rocks.
 
The World Unpacked is a biweekly foreign policy podcast, hosted by Laura Lucas Magnuson, that breaks down the hottest global issues of today with experts, journalists, and policymakers who can explain what is happening, why it matters, and where we go from here. Tune in to get smart on foreign policy.
 
American Diplomat goes behind the scenes to hear real stories from diplomats who lived newsworthy events overseas. Experience the Cuban revolution, Central American insurgencies, the end of apartheid and more through the eyes of those who were there. A project of the Una Chapman Cox Foundation in partnership with the American Academy of Diplomacy.
 
Power Problems is a bi-weekly podcast from the Cato Institute. Host John Glaser offers a skeptical take on U.S. foreign policy, and discusses today’s big questions in international security with distinguished guests from across the political spectrum. Podcast Hashtag: #FPPowerProblems. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
There's never been a better time to understand what's going on in Asia. That's why we talk to the people who know it best. The Asia In-Depth podcast brings you conversations with the world's leading experts and thought-leaders on the politics, economics, and culture of Asia — and beyond. Subscribe today.
 
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show series
 
To start off the week, we're addressing recent allegations by Democrats that the Capitol riot could have been planned in advance. What does the evidence suggest so far? Then, a well-known critic of critical race theory, Chris Rufo, joins the show to explain what's going on with racial indoctrination in public schools and the Marxist roots of these …
 
Foreign Minister Wang Yi's stopover in Kinshasa on his latest Africa tour highlights the growing importance of the DR Congo in Chinese foreign policy. During his visit, Wang announced a modest debt relief package and that the DRC would become the 45th African country to join the Belt and Road Initiative. But those initiatives belie the DR Congo's l…
 
Andrew Hom’s new book examines what he calls the “problem of time” in context of international relations and international relations theory. The subject of time is a growing field of research and scholarship in political science and political theory, and Hom’s book spans both these areas by focusing on the way that time and the theory of timing con…
 
*description coming soon*Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this podcast, please consider donating to Media Roots Radio on Patreon // www.patreon.com/mediarootsradioPatreon subscribers at the $5 tier get access to an exclusive bonus episode per month.FOLLOW // twitter.com/AbbyMartin // twitter.com/FluorescentGrey…
 
What is the role of the intellectual? Is violence, not to mention radical change, necessary? Can there be a revolution without them? Realistic Revolution: Contesting Chinese History, Culture, and Politics after 1989 by Els van Dongen (Cambridge University Press, 2019) analyses a series of debates in the early 1990s between Chinese intellectuals as …
 
The second of Daniel Todman's two sweeping volumes on Great Britain and World War II, Britain's War: A New World, 1942-1947 (Oxford UP, 2020), begins with the event Winston Churchill called the "worst disaster" in British military history: the Fall of Singapore in February 1942 to the Japanese. As in the first volume of Todman's epic account of Bri…
 
Twenty-eight years after Francis Fukuyama declared the “end of history” and pronounced Western-style liberalism as the culmination of a Hegelian narrative of progress, pundits and academics of all stripes find themselves struggling to explain the failed prediction that China’s increased activity in international markets would inevitably lead to inc…
 
The second of Daniel Todman's two sweeping volumes on Great Britain and World War II, Britain's War: A New World, 1942-1947 (Oxford UP, 2020), begins with the event Winston Churchill called the "worst disaster" in British military history: the Fall of Singapore in February 1942 to the Japanese. As in the first volume of Todman's epic account of Bri…
 
F. B. Chang and S. T. Rucker-Chang's Roma Rights and Civil Rights: A Transatlantic Comparison (Cambridge UP, 2020) tackles the movements for - and expressions of - equality for Roma in Central and Southeast Europe and African Americans from two complementary perspectives: law and cultural studies. Interdisciplinary in approach, the book engages wit…
 
Aaron continues on the same thread as last week's show. The events of January 6th are neither the beginning, nor the end, of an ongoing political story. The War on Terror had experienced a lull for a few years, but is returning as the new face of terror is the PT Cruiser. topics include: Washington DC, Capitol Hill, riot, protest, angry mob, right …
 
A treaty to ban the use of nuclear weapons becomes international law on January 22, 2021. The treaty seeks to do to nuclear weapons what previous international treaties have done to chemical and biological weapons -- that is, prohibit their use on humanitarian grounds. Nobel Peace Prize winning Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International…
 
By Anna McNeil Sea Control 223. Author Andrea Pitzer joins Sea Control’s Anna McNeil to talk about her recent trip to the Arctic and her new book, Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World. From current events to personal testimony, nothing beats firsthand experience and insight into one of the most remote regions of … Continue reading Sea Con…
 
For the first time in twenty years extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on the podcast to talk about how his organization…
 
Abby and Robbie Martin talk about the surreal events of January 6th: how "Stop the Steal" was the perfect culmination of the QAnon cult with the siege of the Capitol building symbolizing the literal storm, Trump's unhinged speech and coded threats toward Pence, the clear stand down of law enforcement implicating multiple levels of government, tech …
 
In this episode of Horns of a Dilemma, Will Inboden, executive director at the Clements Center at the University of Texas at Austin, sits down with David Adesnik and John Hannah from the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, to discuss their recent work, “From Trump to Biden: The Way Ahead for United States National Security.” Inboden and the auth…
 
In many ways, Yamen Bai is just like any other 11-year-old kid in Canada. “I like to play hockey,” Yamen said in a phone interview, adding that his favorite part of the sport is scoring goals and winning games. Unlike many kids in Canada, where hockey is a sport embedded in the country’s national identity, Yamen didn’t put on his first pair of skat…
 
Bro History Sparta in Nazi Germany In the 19th & 20th century, many German academics idolized Sparta’s rigorous martial education and state structures. In addition, Adolf Hitler once called Sparta “the purest racial State in history” (He would have loved the movie 300). Therefore, it should come at no surprise that Sparta was seen as an ancient pro…
 
Welcome back to the Hopkins Podcast on Foreign Affairs, the entirely student-run podcast out of Johns Hopkins University. In this episode, we dive into the topic of Hindu nationalism — how has it affected Indian politics, society, and foreign policy? To help us answer these questions, today on the podcast we are joined by Dr. Milan Vaishnav. To lis…
 
How can multiple theoretical approaches yield a better understanding of international political politics? In Understanding and Explaining the Iranian Nuclear 'Crisis': Theoretical Approaches (Lexington Books, 2020), Dr. Halit M. E. Tagma, assistant professor in the department of politics and international affairs at Northern Arizona University and …
 
How can multiple theoretical approaches yield a better understanding of international political politics? In Understanding and Explaining the Iranian Nuclear 'Crisis': Theoretical Approaches (Lexington Books, 2020), Dr. Halit M. E. Tagma, assistant professor in the department of politics and international affairs at Northern Arizona University and …
 
The life of Francisco Goya (1746–1828) coincided with an age of transformation in Spanish history that brought upheavals in the country’s politics and at the court which Goya served, changes in society, the devastation of the Iberian Peninsula in the war against Napoleon, and an ensuing period of political instability. In this revelatory biography,…
 
In this interview, I talk with Dora Zhang, associate professor of English and comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley, about her book Strange Likeness: Description in the Modernist Novel, published by the University of Chicago Press in 2020. While description has been “near universally devalued” in literary thinking, and pa…
 
World Bank President David Malpass discusses global economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.The C. Peter McColough Series on International Economics brings the world's foremost economic policymakers and scholars to address members on current topics in international economics and U.S. monetary policy. This meeting series is presented by the Mau…
 
The U.S. House of Representatives has voted to impeach Donald Trump a second time. Why are legislators doing this, and what does it mean for the future of political discourse? Also, we discuss the abortion legislation that was recently passed in Argentina, which allows abortions through the 14th week of pregnancy. And, we address the allegations su…
 
China is the biggest greenhouse gas emitter in the world. But it's also at the forefront of renewable energy innovation and has some of the world's largest conservation projects. Beijing is trying to reach net-zero carbon emissions by the year 2060. That means contributing no additional greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Yifei Li is an environment…
 
Today, many are examining leadership in American politics. Historians, biographers, and journalists are turning to the past to uncover how leadership, especially the presidency, has changed throughout the decades. Among those is historian Fredrik Logevall, who recently published a book on President John F. Kennedy, Jr., titled “JFK: Coming of Age i…
 
The worst of the worst: Victor Bout, Russian arms dealer, is not the only one. A a host of other nogoodnicks invest their nefarious proceeds in American cities such as Louisville, Dallas, Cleveland, unbeknownst to city officials. These criminals receive real estate tax breaks but never pay tax, drive up market prices, destroy jobs, and are never he…
 
On December 17, 2010, a Tunisian street vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire to protest corruption and poor economic conditions. His death sparked mass popular protests in Tunisia that quickly carried over to other countries in the Middle East. Tunisia is often hailed as the success story of the Arab Spring. The protests that shook the…
 
In this episode of the the Essential Geopolitics podcast from Stratfor, a RANE company, Emily Donahue hears from Sam Lichtenstein a global security analyst with Stratfor and RANE. The events at the US Capitol the first week of January, 2021 stunned lawmakers, the U.S. public and allies and both allies and opponents around the globe. The events, and…
 
The “diva” is a common trope when we talk about culture. We normally think of the diva as a Western construction: the opera singer, the Broadway actress, the movie star. A woman of outstanding talent, whose personality and ability are both larger-than-life. But the truth is throughout history, many cultures have featured spaces for strong female ar…
 
Much is known about the Qing sartorial regulations and how the Qing conquerors forced Han Chinese males to adopt Manchu hairstyle and clothing. But what happened on the stage? What did Qing performers wear, not only when they performed as characters in the Han past, but also when they appeared as subjects in the Manchu present? Reading dramatic wor…
 
In Creativity in Tokyo: Revitalizing a Mature City (Palgrave, 2020), Heide Imai and Matjaz Ursic focues on overlooked contextual factors that constitute the urban creative climate or innovative urban milieu in contemporary cities. Filled with reflections based on interviews with a diverse range of creative actors in various local neighborhoods in T…
 
I think this is the fifth time I've interviewed John K. Roth for the podcast (and the second for Carol Rittner). He has always been relentlessly realistic about the challenges, intellectual, practical and emotional, that Holocaust Studies poses. Advancing Holocaust Studies (Routledge, 2020), however, reads differently. Published in a world wracked …
 
As Donald Trump's presidency draws to a close, his opponents give thanks that he never developed a strategy or learned to use his powers and agencies efficiently. If he had, like Hungary's four-term prime minister Viktor Orbán, Trump could have created an "illiberal democracy" - a country with democratic trappings but with a charismatic, nationalis…
 
New videos surfacing from last week’s siege of the US Capitol show how the attack was both chaotic and coordinated. Some of the rioters wore earpieces to communicate with one another. Related: In pictures: Trump loyalists storm US Capitol In one clip, a woman with a bullhorn discusses the building floor plan with men in camouflage and tells them wh…
 
The United Nations is expected to hold the tenth Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference in 2021, following its spring 2020 postponement. In this event, panelists discuss the status of the treaty, which has facilitated nonproliferation cooperation for more than fifty years, including the major accomplishments of its signatories and …
 
Today we’re going to address the cartel-like behavior of big tech companies (while we still can). The president himself and countless other conservatives are finding themselves banned from more and more online platforms. What kind of world does this lead to, and is it one we really want to live in? Also, how is it that the Left, who are supposedly …
 
Albert Camus, one of the most famous French philosophers and novelists, has a diverse fan base. British alternative rockers The Cure sang about The Stranger in their first big hit, “Killing an Arab”, released in 1980. George W. Bush announced that the novel was his summer reading in 2006 (considering the book’s central plot point and what he had un…
 
In the past decade, Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden became household names. They were celebrated by many as truth-tellers who blew the whistle on governmental abuses. Yet, in the eyes of the state, Manning and Snowden had made so-called “unauthorized disclosures” that jeopardized the nation’s security. Described as such, they could not be labell…
 
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