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Phil Town is a hedge fund manager and author of 3 New York Times best-selling investment books, Invested, Rule #1, and Payback Time. On the InvestED podcast, Phil and his daughter Danielle shine a light on the successful investing strategies that gurus like Warren Buffett have used for 80 years. Listen in for a great stock market education on basics, learn how to invest on your own, and follow along with real-time examples and investing tips from week to week. Subscribe and leave a review. Q ...
 
Hidden Histories sees Helen Carr exploring some of the country's hidden treasures, as she and some of our finest historians scramble through the actual spaces where history happened. Whether she's visiting the whorehouses of Covent Garden, or retracing the steps of the Peasants Revolt, Helen and her guests are a delightful guide to the hidden histories that lie just off the beaten track.
 
📊 VITAL MUSIC 📊 Based Media Company artist need any Marketing or Promotions Please go to the Website Link... # Lets take your Music career to the next level! Do you need to Monetize(make money)your? (Instagram,Twitter,FB,SoundCloud,Youtube) Views,Subscribe,Comments,Watchtime,Likes, Comments,Followers? Get Authentic Audience/Fanbase? Services Provided: * Administration(Copyrights,Pub,Registrar) * YouTube (playlist,repost,sharing) * SoundCloud (playlist,repost,sharing * Spotify Promo (playlist ...
 
The Guardian's political editor, Heather Stewart, and deputy political editor, Jessica Elgot, are joined by commentators, experts and politicians to unpack the week's biggest stories in politics. On Politics Weekly Extra, Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland speaks with some of the Guardian’s US team about the latest from the 2020 presidential election campaign
 
Anatole France, in his satirical and allegorical fashion, weaves a tale of fantasy which finds a mischievous guardian angel stealing books from his earthly charge, who happens to be an archbishop in possession of a plethora of literature, mostly theological in nature. After voracious reading and then becoming a "fallen" angel, he decides to search for and recruit other "fallen" angels who devise a plan to attempt an overthrow of the rule which had set their fate, realizing that revolt is nec ...
 
Bringing you the history of leftists of color one swipe at a time. This podcast is hosted by Left POCket Project creator Wendi Muse & her co-host Richard. Learn more about the Left POCket Project via: Twitter: twitter.com/LeftPOC Facebook: facebook.com/leftpoc Media Revolt: mediarevolt.org/leftpoc Reddit: reddit.com/user/leftpoc/ Subscribe: Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/leftpoc Spreaker: spreaker.com/user/leftpoc Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/13trBKujjjBnmWHeDZcC5Z or search "LeftPOC" iTunes: ...
 
Nat Turner led the most famous slave rebellion in American history, yet how much do you actually know about him? How many of Nat Turner's 6 initial soldiers can you name? What were Nat Turner's motivations? What were the motivations of his men? Just how violent did the revolt actually get? After listening to the Nat Turner podcast you'll be able to answer all of these questions and much more. Follow Josh Harraway on a journey back in time as he uses sound effects and a full cast of actors to ...
 
After completing the famous Mme Bovary, Flaubert put all his efforts into researching the Punic Wars and completed the lesser known Salammbô. In this volume, Flaubert describes in detail the Mercenary Revolt and the fight of the Mercenaries against the all-powerful Carthage, the theft of the magical Zaimph and the love and hate between the Carthaginian princess Salammbô and the fiercest leader of the Mercenaries, Matho. (Summary by Carolin)
 
Bertrand Russell, 3rd Earl Russell (1872 – 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, political activist and Nobel laureate. He led the British "revolt against idealism" in the early 1900s and is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege and his protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein. In this book, written in 1918, he offers his assessment of three competing streams in the thought of the political left: Marxian socialism, anarchism and ...
 
The incredible journey of the world’s most influential swamp and those who call it home. Beginning at the end of the last ice age and trekking all the way through to the modern era, together we step through the centuries and meet some of the cast of characters who fashioned and forged a boggy marshland into a vibrant mercantile society and then further into a sea-trotting global super-power before becoming the centre for modern day liberalism.
 
ReVolt is about the history and future of how we generate, distribute, and consume electricity. Take a deep dive into the river of electrons and travel through time to find out how energy got so complicated.
 
Based off her popular and darkly humorous Facebook page, blog and forthcoming novel of the same name, author Brandy Ferner takes her love of adult conversation to the air as she spears the injustices of modern parenting and continues her tradition of saying things out loud that others won’t. As a lover of truth and all things dark comedy, she and special guests partake in real talk about everything relating to motherhood – marriage post kids, birth, the never-ending micromanagement of screen ...
 
It is fair to conclude that in a democracy all policy is politics. Ergo, all policy interventions should also be seen through the prism of politics. In this podcast, Anil Padmanabhan will explore this intersection of politics and economics to try and give you a fresh perspective on the week that was. This is a Mint production, brought to you by HT Smartcast.
 
EconTalk is an award-winning weekly podcast hosted by Russ Roberts of Stanford University's Hoover Institution. The eclectic guest list includes authors, doctors, psychologists, historians, philosophers, economists, and more. Learn how the health care system really works, the serenity that comes from humility, the challenge of interpreting data, how potato chips are made, what it's like to run an upscale Manhattan restaurant, what caused the 2008 financial crisis, the nature of consciousness ...
 
The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind Tides Of History, Fall Of Rome and ...
 
Space Patrol a 1950s TV and Radio Show follows the adventures of Commander Buzz Corey (Ed Kemmer) of the United Planets Space Patrol and his young sidekick Cadet Happy (Lyn Osborn) â yes, Cadet Happy â as they faced nefarious villians with diabolical schemes. Not surprisingly for the time, some of these villians had Russian- or German-sounding accents. Cmdr. Corey and his allies were aided by such nifty gadgets as "miniature space-o-phones" and "atomolights." Episodes had titles like "Revolt ...
 
Economics Detective Radio is a podcast about markets, ideas, institutions, and all things related to the field of economics. Episodes consist of long-form interviews and are generally released on Fridays. Topics include economic theory, economic history, the history of thought, money, banking, finance, macroeconomics, public choice, business cycles, health care, education, international trade, and anything else of interest to economists, students, and serious amateurs interested in the scien ...
 
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show series
 
In this week’s After Show Lord Thomas discusses his experience getting haemorrhoids - pray for his anus (first published October 26. 2019). We also discuss men’s behaviour towards their favourite pop stars at meet-and-greets (first published November 9, 2019). The Gays Are Revolting went on an indefinite hiatus in August 2020. Keep up to date with …
 
In this episode of "REVOLT BLACK NEWS," Eboni K. Williams is joined by the Mayor of Atlanta, Keisha Lance Bottoms, to discuss Georgia’s pivotal role in the 2020 presidential election, where the state turned blue for Joe Biden, which was the first time Georgia turned blue for a Democratic president candidate in 28 years, as well as the state's cruci…
 
In Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt (Princeton UP, 2019) Marissa Anne Bass explores the moment when the seismic forces of the Dutch Revolt wreaked havoc on the region’s creative and intellectual community, compelling its members to seek solace in intimate exchanges of art and knowledge. At the book’s center is a neglected treasur…
 
On this week’s edition of the St Albans Podcast, we hear from our legal correspondent Michael Labrum. He explains the current stamp duty holiday and how we have until the end of March 2021 to take advantage of it. If you would like to know more, check out his law firm www.labrums.co.uk Also on the show we hear from Matt Adams and Laura Bill from th…
 
We're conducting a brief survey of our listeners. Two lucky participants will be selected to receive a $30 Amazon gift card! Thanks in advance for being a thoughtful listener, go to the survey now. In this episode, Jodi Magness about the history of Masada, its role in public memory, and why it matters. Her book Masada: From Jewish Revolt to Modern …
 
Joanna Cohen is a historian of 19th century America, and a Senior Lecturer in American History at Queen Mary University of London. Helen talks to her about the relationship between patriotism and consumption and how American attitudes towards consumption changed over the 19th century, particularly in response to the American Civil War. The ways peo…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
Social and Conceptual Issues in Astrobiology (Oxford University Press, 2020) focuses on the emerging scientific discipline of astrobiology, exploring many of the humanistic issues this multidisciplinary field is generating. Despite there being myriad scientific questions that astrobiologists have only begun to address, this is not a purely scientif…
 
In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country's most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they…
 
In 1930s Bucharest, some of the country's most brilliant young intellectuals converged to form the Criterion Association. Bound by friendship and the dream of a new, modern Romania, their members included historian Mircea Eliade, critic Petru Comarnescu, Jewish playwright Mihail Sebastian and a host of other philosophers and artists. Together, they…
 
Common morality has been the touchstone of medical ethics since the publication of Beauchamp and Childress's Principles of Biomedical Ethics in 1979. Rosamond Rhodes challenges this dominant view by presenting an original and novel account of the ethics of medicine, one deeply rooted in the actual experience of medical professionals. She argues tha…
 
The Icelandic mappae mundi were a series of maps produced in the late medieval period (c. 1225 - c. 1400) that bore witness to fundamental changes in the landscape of vernacular literary culture, scientific thinking and regional geopolitics. In The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland (D.S. Brewer, 2020), Dale Kedwards explores the plethora of meanings…
 
We're conducting a brief survey of our listeners. Two lucky participants will be selected to receive a $30 Amazon gift card! Thanks in advance for being a thoughtful listener, go to the survey now. Francesca Trivellato joins us to discuss her book The Promise and Peril of Credit, and the longstanding legend that Jews invented bills of exchange. Lis…
 
In this episode, part of the Comrade Mommy series, Wendi discusses the election, politics, and how to broach the subject with children.---Music: "My Life as a Video Game" by Michael Salamone---Learn more about the Left POCket Project via:Twitter: twitter.com/LeftPOCFacebook: facebook.com/leftpocMedia Revolt: mediarevolt.org/leftpocReddit: reddit.co…
 
The UK government says new petrol and diesel-powered cars will be banned by 2030. Will developments in battery tech deliver electric vehicles for the mass-market? Plus how Kenya is looking to wind energy to bring cleaner power to off-grid communities. And has the pandemic permanently changed how we look at screen-time? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jone…
 
How was the relationship between Muslim and non-Muslim communities theologically and spatially imagined in the premodern world? How did religious hierarchies map onto notions of place and spatial distinction and hierarchies? In her dazzling new book Minding their Place: Space and Religious Hierarchy in Ibn al-Qayyim’s Aḥkām ahl al-Dhimma (Brill, 20…
 
Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation (Basic Books, 2016) that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident …
 
“Awareness of the EU's undeniable past and present importance can - and has - led to complacency and hubris. There is nothing inevitable about European integration". So writes Mark Gilbert in European Integration: A Political History (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020), a compact, narrative history of the European Communities and the European Union pitc…
 
How progressive is too progressive? Jonathan Freedland and Maanvi Singh discuss how Joe Biden and Kamala Harris will need to think long and hard as they embark on a bid to unify the moderates of the Democratic party and those further left. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod…
 
No Future in this Country: The Prophetic Pessimism of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner by Andre E. Johnson, an Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Media Studies at the University of Memphis, and Director of the Henry McNeal Turner digital humanities project, is a rhetorical history that details the public career of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner with an emph…
 
Monday we had good news on a Covid vaccine from Moderna, created with a billion dollars of taxpayer funding. Gregg Gonsalves takes up the question, Why does Moderna get to keep all the profits? Also: Why Mitch McConnell is a bigger threat to Americans than the virus. Plus: The legendary film critic for the late, lamented Village Voice, J. Hoberman,…
 
Matt and Laura from the Herts Ad bring us some local news stories. They tell us about an unfortunate incident where a young girl was injured by a discarded needle and about new charges for garden waste collection. A good news story follows about a couple who managed to pull together plans for their wedding in a few short days before the new lockdow…
 
The Bone Era takes part in the continuing war, and then catches up with each other after 5 months doing their own thing. -------------------------------------- Battle Map: https://www.dropbox.com/s/mb9mct30zs00v3c/ArlosoFamilyHomeBattle.PNG?dl=0 Support Hela's Hand Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cameronevesquedavis Get Our Merch!: …
 
Jessica Elgot and Michael Savage discuss the latest on Corbyn, Johnson’s self-isolation and lockdown restrictions in Scotland. Patrick Wintour reports on a trip to Moscow by a Foreign Office minister. Plus Salma Shah and Jason Stein describe what it is like to be a spad in times of crisis. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/…
 
When President Eisenhower appointed Earl Warren Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 1953, he assumed the former California governor would be a force for reliably conservative force on the court. Warren was widely popular and seen as a safe, moderate and respectable But under Warren’s leadership, the Court took on a new direction, making decisions…
 
Scholarship on the German philosopher Martin Heidegger has traditionally focused on his magnum opus Being and Time and related earlier work, his later essays and lectures often relegated to an ambiguous later period that many consider philosophically insubstantial, or simply too esoteric and obscure to merit any serious engagement. Luckily, that is…
 
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Ara Marjian, Professor of Italian and affiliate of the Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History at New York University about his newest book Against the Avant-Garde: Pier Paolo Pasolini, Contemporary Art, and Neocapitalism (University of Chicago Press, 2020). Paosolini, …
 
This has been an emotionally exhausting year for everyone, and you’ve probably been affected in one way or another. Gratitude can be a powerful tool for resilience in the face of adversity, so this week we’re practicing being thankful before the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. We are incredibly grateful for all of our listeners and hope you enjoy th…
 
Description: In 1902 and 1919, US coal miners undertook huge strikes and both times they won. In one case, the intervention of a US President sealed the win. But what happened in the other? Bill and Rachel discuss. Links and notes for Ep. 333 (PDF): http://arsenalfordemocracy.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/AFD-Ep-333-Links-and-Notes-The-Coal-Strike…
 
In 1964, Malcolm X was invited to debate at the Oxford Union Society at Oxford University. The topic of debate that evening was the infamous phrase from Barry Goldwater's 1964 Republican Convention speech: "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue." His response to this topic stands out as on…
 
In Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt (Princeton UP, 2019) Marissa Anne Bass explores the moment when the seismic forces of the Dutch Revolt wreaked havoc on the region’s creative and intellectual community, compelling its members to seek solace in intimate exchanges of art and knowledge. At the book’s center is a neglected treasur…
 
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Sharon Strocchia, Professor of History at Emory University. She is the author of Death and Ritual in Renaissance Florence, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992), Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), and the book we are here to talk about to…
 
On this episode of New Books in History, Jana Byars talks with Sharon Strocchia, Professor of History at Emory University. She is the author of Death and Ritual in Renaissance Florence, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992), Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009), and the book we are here to talk about to…
 
In Insect Artifice: Nature and Art in the Dutch Revolt (Princeton UP, 2019) Marissa Anne Bass explores the moment when the seismic forces of the Dutch Revolt wreaked havoc on the region’s creative and intellectual community, compelling its members to seek solace in intimate exchanges of art and knowledge. At the book’s center is a neglected treasur…
 
Author and journalist Virginia Postrel talks about her book The Fabric of Civilization and How Textiles Made the World with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Postrel tells the fascinating story behind the clothes we wear and everything that goes into producing them throughout history. The history of textiles, Postrel argues, is a good way of understandin…
 
In Italian Neorealism: A Cultural History (University of Toronto Press, 2020), Charles Leavitt steps back from the micro-histories focusing more narrowly on, for example, Italian cinema so as to weave together divers cultural strands (literature, the visual arts, drama, journalism, poetry, essays) into a tapestry of historical practice. Which reali…
 
Science may be known for banishing the demons of superstition from the modern world. Yet just as the demon-haunted world was being exorcized by the enlightening power of reason, a new kind of demon mischievously materialized in the scientific imagination itself. Scientists began to employ hypothetical beings to perform certain roles in thought expe…
 
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