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Radiolab is one of the most beloved podcasts and public radio shows in the world. The show is known for its deep-dive journalism and innovative sound design. Created in 2002 by host Jad Abumrad, the program began as an exploration of scientific inquiry. Over the years it has evolved to become a platform for long-form journalism and storytelling. Radiolab is co-hosted by Lulu Miller and Latif Nasser.
 
Every weekday, TED Talks Daily brings you the latest talks in audio. Join host and journalist Elise Hu for thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable — from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between — given by the world's leading thinkers and creators. With TED Talks Daily, find some space in your day to change your perspectives, ignite your curiosity, and learn something new.
 
Bill Nye is on a mission to change the world — one voicemail at a time. Bill and science writer Corey S. Powell take your burning questions and put them to the world's leading experts on just about every topic in the universe. Should you stop eating cheeseburgers to combat climate change? Could alien life be swimming inside the moons of Jupiter and Saturn? Does your pet parakeet learn to sing the way that you learned to speak? Bill, Corey, and their special guests will answer those questions ...
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
Planetary Radio brings you the human adventure across our solar system and beyond. We visit each week with the scientists, engineers, leaders, advocates and astronauts who are taking us across the final frontier. Regular features raise your space IQ while they put a smile on your face. Join host Mat Kaplan and Planetary Society colleagues including Bill Nye the Science Guy, Bruce Betts, and Emily Lakdawalla as they dive deep into the latest space news. The monthly Space Policy Edition takes ...
 
Leading science journalists provide a daily minute commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American . To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast
 
Rationally Speaking is the bi-weekly podcast of New York City Skeptics. Join host Julia Galef and guests as they explore the borderlands between reason and nonsense, likely from unlikely, and science from pseudoscience. Any topic is fair game as long as we can bring reason to bear upon it, with both a skeptical eye and a good dose of humor! We agree with the Marquis de Condorcet, who said that in an open society we ought to devote ourselves to "the tracking down of prejudices in the hiding p ...
 
The surprising connections in science and technology that give you the Big Picture. Astronomer Seth Shostak and science journalist Molly Bentley are joined each week by leading researchers, techies, and journalists to provide a smart and humorous take on science. Our regular "Skeptic Check" episodes cast a critical eye on pseudoscience.
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Physics World Weekly offers a unique insight into the latest news, breakthroughs and innovations from the global scientific community. Our award-winning journalists reveal what has captured their imaginations about the stories in the news this week, which might span anything from quantum physics and astronomy through to materials science, environmental research and policy, and biomedical science and technology. Find out more about the stories in this podcast by visiting the Physics World web ...
 
Hello! This is The Vergecast, the flagship podcast of The Verge... and your life. Every Friday, Nilay Patel and Dieter Bohn make sense of the week's tech news with help from our wide-ranging staff. And on Tuesdays, Nilay hosts in-depth, one-on-one interviews with major technology leaders. Join us every week for a fun, deeply nerdy, often off-the-rails conversation about what's happening now (and next) in technology and gadgets.
 
[We have episodes in German and English] How do scientists uncover phenomena and explain their connections? How do engineers design machines, methods and infrastructure? At omega tau, experts give detailed answers. Over the last ten years, we have produced 300 episodes in which we dug deeper, until we ran out of questions. Join us on our journey through the world of science and engineering: the closer you look and listen, the more interesting things get.
 
Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived ...
 
Delve into topical issues in zoology, conservation and the environment, from saving species and protecting the planet, to finding out about the animals living across the globe, including in London’s own river Thames. Learn more about the science behind the conservation work being done by ZSL and others, in this podcast from ZSL’s Institute of Zoology. Hosted by Dr Monni Böhm.
 
Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.
 
Emergence Magazine is an online publication with annual print edition exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Our podcast features exclusive interviews, narrated essays, stories and more. During this pandemic, we are publishing new content that explores the deeper themes and questions emerging at this t ...
 
This podcast's purpose is to bring together the field of neuroprosthetics / brain machine interfaces / brain implants in an understandable conversation about the current topics and breakthroughs. We hope to complement scientific papers on new neural research in an easy, digestable way. Innovators and professionals can share thoughts or ideas to facilitate 'idea sex' to make the field of brain implants a smaller and more personal space.
 
In-depth conversations in applied geophysics from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). With new episodes monthly, Seismic Soundoff highlights industry leaders; emerging research and technology; the social contributions of geoscience; and the latest geophysical, environmental, and engineering applications.
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
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Microbial sciences are experiencing a "gold rush of research," says Seed co-founder and co-CEO Raja Dhir. He discusses how Seed is a part of that work with a multi-technology approach to all aspects of the microbiome, from gut health to coral reef protection. Listen and learn How Seed's biology research takes on microbial activity for the entire bo…
 
Researcher Terry Hrubec found startling evidence that a common chemical in disinfectants can cause birth defects in mice. She explains the science, describes the ubiquitous use of quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), and helps listeners understand the numerous concerns over this everyday disinfectant, especially with increased use as a COVID preca…
 
Dr Chris Smith and the Naked Scientist team with the latest news, including the science behind change in policy on the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine in the UK, more on the Government's lateral flow testing strategy, and why gorillas beat their chest. Plus an in depth look at what the hospital of the future might look like. Get the podcast from the B…
 
Today’s podcast is an interview with New Zealander of the Year Dr. Siouxsie Wiles. Dr. Wiles’ program uses bioluminesence as a marker to follow bacterial growth and disease progression. Her work seeks to identify [...] The post 287 – Bioluminescence, Antibiotic Resistance, and Science Communication first appeared on Talking Biotech Podcast.…
 
Today roads, sidewalks, bridges, and skyscrapers are made of a material called concrete. There's three tons of it for every person on Earth. It's also played a surprisingly large role in rising global temperatures over the last century. So, what exactly makes concrete problematic, and what can we do to fix it? Explore how scientists are working to …
 
Gary McManus joins us to talk about state climatology and extremes in Oklahoma! Gary Mesonet Fun Paper Friday Hurricanes in space? It's raining electrons in this week's fun paper Friday! Zhang, Qing-He, et al. "A space hurricane over the Earth’s polar ionosphere." Nature communications 12.1 (2021): 1-10. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.…
 
How much do Uber and Lyft drivers really earn, after expenses? Are they getting a raw deal by being classified as 'independent contractors' instead of employees? I explore the debate over these questions with three guests: Louis Hyman (Cornell), Veena Dubal (UC Hastings College of the Law), and Harry Campbell (The Rideshare Guy).…
 
How could countries worldwide have handled the economic policies during the pandemic more effectively? The implementation of different strategies could have prevented further financial hardship, research shows. Press play to learn: How lockdowns affected the global economy If vaccine passports are in our near future If restrictions correlate with p…
 
Rick Bright exposed former president Trump's political meddling in the US COVID response. Now he is championing a new privately funded initiative to track viral spread and combat new variants. We discuss the challenges of collecting data on a rapidly spreading virus, from transmission dynamics to genomic surveillance. We also ask why a veteran gove…
 
Today we bring you the fourth episode in a new podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between.By Josh Fischman,Tanya Lewis,Jeffery DelViscio
 
Today's Heavy Networking explores how First Bank uses Aruba’s SD-WAN to advance its cloud migration, support remote workers, and provide secure segmentation for IoT devices. We also discuss the growing trend of SASE and First Bank’s strategy around cloud-delivered security services. Our guests are Marc Ashworth, CISO at First Bank; and Damon Ennis,…
 
Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may not be easily able to access these places amid the pandemic, but after you…
 
Is aquaponic agriculture the future of farming? Development in techniques shows the numerous advantages to soil agriculture. Tune in to learn: How solid particles affect an aquaponics system What the first indication of the disease may be within a tank How plant and animal species can be paired for the best results Dr. Bill McGraw joins the convers…
 
More than 2 million people in the U.S. are incarcerated — and tens of thousands have had COVID-19. The pandemic has brought more attention than ever to the barriers to healthcare in prisons and jails. But this has been a problem since long before COVID-19. Incarceration stamps lasting effects on people’s health, and sends ripple effects beyond the …
 
With each step, you slide 400,000 years back in time. Where are you? Behind a hardware store in New Jersey -- which also happens to be a massive prehistoric graveyard. The only thing that can save it from turning into an apartment complex is geologist Ken Lacovara and a community effort unlike any attempted before. Hear how this town of 15,000 tapp…
 
Spinosaurus was a dinosaur that was around 13 metres long, and looked a little like a T-Rex with the addition of a massive sail on its back. There's been much debate around how it lived; while it seems to be tied to the water, it's unclear how close those ties were. One theory suggests it was actually like a crocodile, living a pretty aquatic life.…
 
Today on New Books in History, Mark A. Waddell, Associate professor of History, Philosophy & Sociology of Science in the Department of History at Michigan State University in beautiful East Lansing Michigan, talks about his recent book, Magic, Science, and Religion in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2021). From the recovery of anci…
 
Vergecast is on vacation this week, so instead we'll share an episode of Land of the Giants from our friends at Recode. Land of the Giants is a podcast that explores the five biggest tech companies and their impact on our world, and this season is all about Google. The episode we're sharing tells the story of how two grad school students with a uni…
 
In this episode, host Andrew Geary speaks with John Bradford on SEG's recent statement on climate change. John led the Climate Change Task Force charged with creating a statement for SEG. The SEG Board adopted the position statement in a unanimous vote during its January 2021 meeting.In this conversation, John provides an overview of SEG's position…
 
Can Clinical trials show what circumstances trigger the onset of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of Dementia? Research shows that more factors may be at play than previously thought. Listen in to learn: The percent of clinical trials for Dementia which result in new and valuable discoveries If loneliness can play a role in the onset of Alzheime…
 
Bees are socially sensitive, says researcher Clare Rittschof, and she's not referring to their pining away from rejection. Rather, honey bee social behavior includes an ability for a colony to band together in a sophisticated enough effort to fight off a hungry bear. Listen and learn How honey bee characteristics are formed by neurogenomics, or exp…
 
This episode of the Physics World Weekly podcast looks at how new technologies can improve our health and how we perceive our surroundings. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-3759129-1'); }); First up is Kostas Kostarelos of the UK’s University of Manchester, who talks about the exciting role that graphene can play in the…
 
Would you pay two percent more for the carbon-neutral version of the products you buy and use every day? In this innovative talk, climate pathfinder Jens Burchardt walks us through the costs and considerations of producing planet-friendly products -- from creation to purchase -- and explains why curbing climate change doesn't have to break the bank…
 
This week's IPv6 Buzz episode features Justine Vick, network architect and engineer and Microsoft veteran whose IPv6 work dates back to the earliest inclusion of the protocol in Windows.We talk about why Microsoft supported and deployed IPv6 early, support challenges in-house and externally, how IPv6 affects software development, and more. The post…
 
We share our planet with microbes. Some do us harm, others do us good and are known as our microbiome. Plants also have a microbiome, and in a paper out recently, scientists working in a seed bank report how they got curious about what microbes could be stored away inside banked seeds. And by surveying seeds from just 1 type of plant, they found ab…
 
The food industry is a wasteland for innovation, or so says Pat Brown. The founder of Impossible Foods explains how animal agriculture wrecks our environment, how chemistry can trick our taste buds, and when we might see Impossible Bacon on our breakfast tables. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Bacteria can teach us how to clean our homes and other environments more eco-consciously and effectively. Press play to learn how, and discover: How people are affected by the use of common cleaning compounds versus the compounds being developed by Wuest and Minbiole What can be learned by studying bacteria that grow in soil, and the compounds they…
 
Pilot Bob Crippen and Commander John Young became the first astronauts to fly a Space Shuttle into orbit on April 12, 1981. Crippen tells host Mat Kaplan about that mission and shares many more stories from his adventurous life. Mat was standing on the dry lake bed in the California desert when STS-1 returned to Earth. Planetary Society senior spac…
 
How do you effectively regulate stress? Therapist Esther Perel discusses the importance of creating routines, rituals and boundaries to deal with pandemic-related loss and uncertainty -- both at home and at work -- and offers some practical tools and techniques to help you regain your sense of self. (This conversation, hosted by TED's Helen Walters…
 
Today's Day Two Cloud podcast is a thorough introduction to AWS Lambda, which is AWS's serverless compute service. We discuss how Lamdba works, what it can do, use cases, and more. Our guide for today's conversation is Julian Wood, Senior Developer Advocate for the Serverless Product Group at AWS. This is not a sponsored show. The post Day Two Clou…
 
How does the aging process lead to neurodegenerative diseases? Research shows that neuroinflammation may play a key role. Press play to learn: What a Tau protein is and how it plays a role in Alzheimer's disease How Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed How amyloid plaques alter your brain Professor of neuroscience and anatomy Goran Šimić joins the conv…
 
What can be done to promote global prosperity? Press play for the answer, and to learn: What factors contribute to inflation in the U.S. What three structural weaknesses exist in developing countries that struggle with weak currencies What economic problems are worsened by tourists Why the U.S. may need to restart the basis of the U.S. economy in c…
 
Want to be featured as a guest on Making Data Simple? Reach out to us at [almartintalksdata@gmail.com] and tell us why you should be next. Abstract Hosted by Al Martin, VP, IBM Expert Services Delivery, Making Data Simple provides the latest thinking on big data, A.I., and the implications for the enterprise from a range of experts. This week on Ma…
 
Welcome to the first episode of a very exciting three-part mini series of the Pint of Science podcast, in collaboration with bit.bio, the cell coding company. The series kicks off with Dr Mark Kotter, founder and CEO of bit.bio. Mark is an academic neurosurgeon and scientist at the University of Cambridge, or more accurately these days, a bio engin…
 
How can you find out if the products chemicals you use are safe? The Toxics Use Reduction Institute works to make production safer and inform manufacturers and the public on chemical toxicity. Listen in to learn: How many chemicals are used in manufacturing, and how many are cause for concern What criteria make a product dangerous How you can disco…
 
Venice is one of the most beautiful cities in the world! Where else can you travel the city on a romantic gondola ride and not be troubled by things like cars, traffic, bicycles, or really any other form of transportation? But all that beauty comes with a price. Thanks to being built almost at sea level, coupled with plate tectonics and general gro…
 
Cancer might be a third category of cell type, thinks clinician Doru Paul. He discusses the continuous interaction and communication between tumor cells versus normal cells that make cancer a disease of the macro environment. Listen and learn Why cancer is a multi-level disease, with influences beyond the cancer and genetics connection, What is kno…
 
The so-called “Peking Man” fossils are some of the first ancient human remains discovered in mainland Asia. So when they disappeared during World War II, it was called one of the worst disasters in the history of archaeology. Now some archeologists claim to have tracked them down. The only problem is they’re underneath a parking lot. Credits Host: …
 
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