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Everyone has albums that were special to them at different times in their life. Deeper Cuts brings three people together to listen to those albums. Join Graeme Burk, Shannon Dohar and Rob Jones every week as they listen to an album that meant something one to them and discuss what it means to them now.
 
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show series
 
We start off what we are affectionately calling our "Vocal Damage" miniseries with one of the greatest soprano showpieces every written for the Broadway stage: "Glitter and Be Gay" from Leonard Bernstein's 1956 comic operetta Candide. The piece is (in)famous for being hard in just about every way a song can be hard, and is most commonly performed t…
 
We conclude our miniseries on soliloquy songs with one of Shannon's favorites: "How Can I Call This Home?" from Jason Robert Brown's 1998 show Parade. Parade is about an especially dark event in 20th century history; listener discretion is advised. All clips are from the 1999 Original Broadway Cast Recording with Brent Carver as Leo Frank and are u…
 
After 33 episodes, we finally come to the second of the twin pillars of modern musical theater: Andrew Lloyd Webber. Specifcially, we talk about "Gethsemane," Jesus's anguished scream of a song from Jesus Christ Superstar. Do we have strong opinions? Oh, you bet we do! All clips are from the 1973 soundtrack of the film version with Ted Neeley as Je…
 
Willlkommen, Bienvenue, Welcome! We continue our exploration of songs that reveal character with the title song from 1966's Kander & Ebb classic Cabaret. Who is Sally Bowles, what does she want, and how are we meant to feel about her? All this, plus the Kennedy Center Honors! All clips are from the 1966 Original Broadway Cast recording with Jill Ha…
 
We begin a new miniseries, focusing on character songs -- those moments when the spotlight falls on a single character and we get a chance to look inside their heart and soul. Fittingly enough, we're beginning with "Soliloquy," the centerpiece aria from Rodgers & Hammerstein's classic Carousel. All clips are from the 2018 revival recording featurin…
 
We complete our second annual Sondheim miniseries by looking at "Unworthy of Your Love," the troubling pastiche of 70s love duets from Assassins, one of the most unsettling musicals ever produced. It's more fun than it sounds like! All clips are from the 2004 Broadway Cast Recording featuring Alexander Gemignani and Mary Catherine Garrison and are …
 
"Please Hello" is from the neglected Sondheim masterpiece Pacific Overtures and is one of the wildest, funniest, and most complicated songs we've ever covered--and maybe one of the best? Learn more about the Asian American Arts Alliance. All clips are from the 1976 Original Broadway Cast Recording featuring Yuki Shimoda, James Dybas, Ernest Harada,…
 
As we continue our annual Sondheim-a-palooza, this time focusing on his pastiche numbers, we come to "Losing My Mind" from Follies. This challening and deeply beautiful show is celebrating its 50th anniversary and seems as powerful as ever. Join Erik and Shannon as they try to figure out why this beatiful, simple song is such a gut punch. All clips…
 
It's the most Sondheim-ful time of the year! In honor of The Great One's birthday, it's time for another Sondheim mini-series. This time, we'll be tackling a few of our favorite pastiche songs from his shows, starting with "You Could Drive a Person Crazy" from Company. We talk about the hidden rage of The Andrews Sisters, the correct pronunciation …
 
For the first time, we are revisiting a show! Yes, to finish off our mini-series of love duets, we are talking about "Pierre & Natasha" from Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812, which we last talked about over a year ago, when the world was a different place. Be prepared: this is essentially us doling out rapturous praise for about 40 minutes…
 
We tackle the importance of re-interpretation this episode as we discuss the 2019 Pasadena Playhouse production of Little Shop of Horrors and that show's best known song, "Suddenly Seymour." What do George Salazar and Mj Rodriguez do to make the song their own, and how fo Erik and Shannon feel about it? Listen now and find out! All clips are from t…
 
This episode, we talk about "Wheels of a Dream" from 1997's Ragtime as we continue our miniseries on love duets. Audra McDonald and Brian Stokes Mitchell made this song iconic, and the pair discuss both their performances and the song's role in the show overall. But be warned: Erik drops a bombshell in this one. All clips are from the 1991 Original…
 
Welcome to 2021 and a new miniseries! We're looking at love duets, and we're beginning with "Yours, Yours, Yours" from 1776, the musical about the American Revolution that *isn't* Hamilton. This show is one of Erik's beloved favorites, and Shannon was completely unfamiliar--did he convince her to love it the way John and Abigail Adams love each oth…
 
Join us as we take a tour through 4--yes 4--holiday classics that have been in Broadway shows! We get super sappy! Happy Holidays!!! All clips are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exemption for criticism and commentary. Listen to the SMSTS playlist on Spotify. Follow the show on Twitter: @somuchstuffpod Email the show: somuchstufftosing@gmail.c…
 
Our annual holiday special has returned and so has our traditional gift exchange! Join Shannon, Graeme and Rob as they exchange albums with each other and find out if their gift a Christmas cracker or a lump of coal. But this time they're not alone: we did this episode live in front of an audience on Zoom! Join the Deeper Cuts trio for Q and A and …
 
We conclude our mini-arc of classic comic turns with "Popular" from Stephen Schwartz's 2003 mega-blockbuster Wicked. Shannon defends her theatre-going choices, Erik creates a new rule, and the pair discuss the patriarchy. Because of course. All clips are from the 2003 Original Broadway Cast album and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exempti…
 
Some shows become classics. Some vanish without a trace. Some, however, fade with the exception of one stand-out song. Such is the case of "Everybody's Girl" from Kander & Ebb's 1997 show Steel Pier. Join Erik and Shannon as they discuss this song that defines fun, sassy, and bawdy. All clips are from the 1997 Original Broadway Cast album and are u…
 
Why are there so many songs about rainbows? In this last episode of our fourth season, the Deeper Cuts trio indulge in some comfort listening, true to our well-established Muppet Agenda. This time, it revolves around the soundtrack album to 1979’s The Muppet Movie. Saving his money from a paper route, a young Graeme bought this, his first self-fina…
 
A year and a half in a new city. A raffle for concert tickets. The tail-end of a slowly declining and not very healthy relationship. It was a time when Shannon realized that things were coming to a head in that phase of her life. This was Shannon's emotional context when she went to a concert as a part of the PBS series The Artist’s Den and saw Ruf…
 
No, we're not talking about that song, but we ARE talking about 1977's Annie--specifically Miss Hannigan's great comic solo "Little Girls." Learn the source of Shannon's complicated relationship with the show and hear Erik explain grammar. All clips are from the 1977 New Broadway Cast Recording and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exemption…
 
Remember record stores? Those magical places which seemingly contained all the music in the world? Rob remembers one such record store fondly -- Cactus Records in Oakville -- because it was there he encountered an album that he'd been interested in for years: Sade's sophisiti-pop opus Diamond Life. How were Sade's stylish sounds received by Rob's f…
 
Parents are good for one or two things. Sometimes, one of them is how they serve as vectors for great music; how to spot it, what to listen for, and how to form your own lifelong love for musical artistry. At a young age, Shannon’s dad helped her hone an appreciation for music by listening to records with her, and particularly ones centered around …
 
Everything sucks, and the world is on fire, so let's at least have some fun with our show tunes! That's Erik and Shannon's approach, at least, as they begin a miniseries of classic comic turns, beginning with "Adelaide's Lament" from Frank Loesser's 1950 classic Guys and Dolls. All clips are from the 1992 New Broadway Cast Recording and are used in…
 
The end of a road can take on many different forms. Sometimes, the road branches off in two or more directions. Sometimes, it’s a dead end. At other times, that road is shrouded in mist with no road signs to indicate what’s ahead. In any of these situations, you have to decide on what to do next to the best of your ability. At the end of his univer…
 
Sometimes, you find yourself growing up. You realize that some of the things you believed and thought were solid in your life really aren’t – and in fact are even harmful to you. You find you have to question those things to create a new path for yourself. You’ve got to start again. This was Graeme’s experience at the end of his high school years a…
 
Shannon and Erik conclude their trek through Pulizer Prince winning musicals with a song from the most recent entrant to that club: "Inner White Girl" from Michael R. Jackson's A Strange Loop. If you're anything like Erik, you may not know this 2019 show at all, some come along and discover something special. Please note: there was all sorts of aud…
 
Shannon and Erik continue their miniseries on selected Pulitzer Prize-winning musicals with a song called "Yorktown (The World Turned Upside Down)" from something called...Hamilton? Maybe you've heard of it? Erik says things that will make the internet hate him, and Shannon shares her experience of waiting to see the show because it was going to be…
 
After a technologically induced hiatus, Shannon and Erik are back talking Pulitzer winners. In this case, the mega-smash Rent and its joyous Act I closer, "La Vie Boheme." Does Benny get a bad rap? Is Shannon a Roger or a Mark? And what, exactly, was gay.com? The main clip is from the 1996 Original Broadway Cast Recording. All clips are used in acc…
 
New miniseries time! This time, we're covering a quartet of songs from Pulitzer Prize-winning musicals, starting with one of the few Broadway songs of the 1940s about racism: "You've Got to Be Carefully" taught from 1949's South Pacific. All that, plus it's the first song by Rodgers & Hammerstein covered on the show, so there's plenty to discuss! T…
 
Erik and Shannon complete their exploration of Sondheim's Act One finales by going...yes...Into the Woods and talking about "Ever After." They occasionally wander from the path, though, because that's where the prettiest flowers are. Apologies for Erik's voice in these past few episodes: he'd apparently swallowed a frog on recording day. All clips …
 
After an opening statement about #BlackLivesMatter and some items we encourage you to read, Erik and Shannon move on to discussing "Sunday" from Sunday in the Park with George, the first of Sondheim's works with James Lapine. While holding back tears, they argue whether lyrics are poetry, ponder the big questions about art, and try to get at what m…
 
As we continue our journey through Sondheim's Act 1 closers, we come to "A Little Priest," from the Sondheim of Shannon's heart, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. But does Erik feel the same way, or will he be thrown into the grinder? All clips are from the 2005 Broadway Revival Cast and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exempt…
 
Get ready for some conflict over, of all things, "A Weekend in the Country" from Stephen Sondheim and Hal Prince's A Little Night Music as we begin out next arc, focusing on Act 1 finales from Sondheim shows. It's gonna be quite a ride! All clips are from the 1973 Original Broadway Cast Recording and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exempti…
 
Welcome to Deeper Cuts: the COVID Sessions -- a three episode miniseries which finds the Deeper Cuts trio taking deep dives into music with deep meaning for us right now as we shelter in place during the COVID-19 pandemic. Living in modern times can be exciting, and also terrifying. Sometimes, it feels like we’re just children in a big imposing wor…
 
Welcome to Deeper Cuts: the COVID Sessions -- a three episode miniseries which finds the Deeper Cuts trio taking deep dives into music with deep meaning for us right now as we shelter in place during the COVID-19 pandemic. Right now during the COVID-19 lockdown, a lot of us find ourselves waiting. We're waiting for conditions to change, waiting for…
 
Shannon and Erik conclude their first foray into closing numbers with the final song from Jason Robert Brown's The Last Five Years "Goodbye Until Tomorrow / I Could Never Rescue You." They talk about beginnings in endings, endings in beginnings, and being young and stupid. All clips are from the 2015 Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (take it up w…
 
Welcome to Deeper Cuts: the COVID Sessions -- a three episode miniseries which finds the Deeper Cuts trio taking deep dives into music with deep meaning for us right now as we shelter in place during the COVID-19 pandemic. During his time sheltering in place, Rob turned to Fountains of Wayne’s 2007 album Traffic and Weather, a record that’s all abo…
 
In this episode we move from the imagined, candy-colored early 60s to the real, tumultuous, "hairy" late 60s. Shannon and Erik continue their mini-series on closing numbers with "The Flesh Failures (Let the Sunshine In)" from the landmark 1968 musical Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical. Yes, that is its full title. All clips are from the 1…
 
But, what if I *want* to stop the beat? Turns out, it can't be done! Join Shannon and Erik as they continue their mini-series on closing number and ride the rocket ship that is "You Can't Stop the Beat" from 2002's Hairspray. Along the way, they talk about integration, staggered breathing, and smashing the patriarchy--all while dancing crazy! (Not …
 
Wait...so, are you saying that anything goes? Erik and Shannon find themselves on an ocean liner in the 1930s as they begin their cycle of closing numbers with Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" from the show of the same name. As they try not to sound condescending about a show that is just FUN, they discuss Sutton Foster's vowels, Erik talks about how …
 
Next stop, River City, Iowa! Erik and Shannon head to the American Midwest in the the early part of the 20th Century to discuss "Rock Island," the bizarre and wonderful opening number from Meredith Wilson's perennial favorite The Music Man. Station stops include Erik's origin story, Shannon's love of trains, and a lot of talk of cracker barrels. Al…
 
Welcome, welcome to Moscow! Erik and Shannon visit Russia during the Napoleonic Wars for Dave Malloy's Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 and its sly, sarcastic opening number, "Prologue." Along the way, they discuss complicated Russian novels, classical sculpture, and "the opera." All clips are from the Original Cast Recording and are use…
 
Erik and Shannon voyage to Anatevka to discuss the opening number to end all opening numbers: "Tradition" from Fiddler on the Roof by Bock & Harnick. There is much love for sad dancing, Zero Mostel, and, well, tradition. All clips are from the Original Broadway Cast Recording and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exemption for criticism and …
 
Shannon and Erik begin their exploration of opening numbers with a shocking, sexy, and seedy cry of liberation: "All That Jazz," from the Kander & Ebb classic Chicago, touching on Fosse, Verdon, and Chita...always Chita. All clips are from the Original Broadway Cast Recording, and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exemption for criticism and…
 
Join Erik and Shannon as they embark on a new podcast about the American musical. In their first episode, they discuss "Our Time" from the Stephen Sondheim classic/flop Merrily We Roll Along. All clips are from the Original Broadway Cast Recording, and are used in accordance with the Fair Use Exemption for criticism and commentary. Buy/stream the a…
 
Home. What does it mean? What associations do people commonly hold about what their home means to them? How can music help to tie us to home, especially when one is far from it and missing it? When Graeme went to a military school at the age of 12, ABBA’s penultimate 1980 album Super Trouper helped him to keep his feet on the ground while he was re…
 
Sometimes, it’s just time to move on. And yet, after struggles, trials and tribulations and painful endings, sometimes that’s not the easiest thing to do. How do you find the right path? How do you redefine your life once an important chapter has closed? This is a situation we all face in one way or another. For Rob, the 2000 album Daisies of the G…
 
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