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Communists of America

Revolutionary Communists of America

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We are America’s communist generation. The Revolutionary Communists of America are a product of this new period in history. We are here for the complete overthrow of capitalism. If you consider yourself a communist, if you’re committed to carrying out a revolution in our lifetime, this is your podcast. Learn more and join the party at communistusa.org.
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Aamer and Erin bring you weekly true crime with a political twist. Assassinations, terrorism, war crimes, and revolutions—nothing is off-limits! New episodes drop Tuesdays with bonus content available on our Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/dascriminal
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Weekly radio show from the Democratic Socialists of America in NYC, recorded live at WBAI 99.5 in Brooklyn NY, Tuesday @ 7pm EST. Listen and call-in! Our vision for a democratic socialist future, from the minds and hearts of organizers fighting every day in NYC. Hear the latest news, analysis, and organizing experience from our members and partners and learn how to be part of a revolutionary political moment. Join the movement at socialists.nyc!
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News, politics, history, culture, and more from Jacobin. Featuring The Dig, Long Reads, Behind the News, Jacobin Radio w/ Suzi Weissman, Michael and Us, and occasional specials. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Blueprints of Disruption

Rabble Rousers' Cooperative

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Blueprints of Disruption is dedicated to amplifying the work of activists, organizers and rabble rousers. This weekly podcast, hosted by Jessa McLean and Santiago Helou Quintero, features in-depth discussions that explore different ways to challenge capitalism, decolonize spaces and create movements on the ground. Together we will disrupt the status quo one Thursday at a time.
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The Blockchain Socialist

The Blockchain Socialist

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A podcast by The Blockchain Socialist (@TBSocialist) giving a platform for those at the intersection of blockchain and Left politics. Subscribe to the Patreon to get access to bonus content and support my work: https://www.patreon.com/theblockchainsocialist
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In this podcast, Matthew Rothwell, author of Transpacific Revolutionaries: The Chinese Revolution in Latin America, explores the global history of ideas related to rebellion and revolution. The main focus of this podcast for the near future will be on the history of the Chinese Revolution, going all the way back to its roots in the initial Chinese reactions to British imperialism during the Opium War of 1839-1842, and then following the development of the revolution and many of the ideas tha ...
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Podcast from Anticapitalist Resistance, a revolutionary socialist organisation based in England and Wales. Analysis and commentary on everything from politics, economics, social issues and philosophy. Also fighting in the front line of the culture war on the anti-Nazi side.
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Ideas to Change the World

Socialist Workers Party

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Podcasts to change the world. We post podcasts discussing socialism, anti-racism, fighting fascism, climate change and much more. Join us here: https://swp.org.uk Get the latest news at: https://socialistworker.co.uk Introduction by Sally Campbell Music by James Pettefar https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcP5P9DPHOlecD-L5pyi-2w
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On April 23, 1990, in Washington, DC, the Mises Institute sponsored the first Austrian school look at the post-socialist age. It went a long way toward developing a blueprint—consistent with the Austrian tradition—for dismantling the command economy. Featuring Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Krzysztof Ostaszewski, Yuri N. Maltsev, Gottfried Haberler, Kestutis Baltramatis, Murray N. Rothbard, and Joseph Sobran.
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1Dime Radio

Tony of 1Dime

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A political podcast dedicated to combating one-dimensional thought through the insights of Philosophy, History, Economics, Critical Theory, Culture, and Society. Your boss makes a dollar, you make a dime, so that's why you listen to 1Dime Radio on company time. For access to the Patreon exclusive episodes (The Backroom podcast), become a Patron: thttps://www.patreon.com/OneDime
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Reimagining Soviet Georgia

Reimagining Soviet Georgia

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We are a multigenerational, multilingual, Tbilisi based collective. Our goal is to reexamine and rearticulate the history of Soviet Georgia by producing and supporting critical research, including oral and written histories, and a podcast for both Georgian and English speaking audiences.
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IEA Podcast

Institute of Economic Affairs

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The Institute of Economic Affairs podcast examines some of the pressing issues of our time. Featuring some of the top minds in Westminster and beyond, the IEA podcast brings you weekly commentary, analysis, and debates. insider.iea.org.uk
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Outa-Space

Rob MacDonald

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We explore the relationship between International arts and the class struggle. Interviews, Commentary and audio art. We are Outa-space because artists often lack the place to make and create work. We are Outa-space because the street, the squares, online and all the common places we mix in are where we need to decide our future. We are Outa-space because we need to take our minds above the clouds to look down on our planet, to dream, to wonder, but also to see everything in the context of ev ...
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Jamie puts questions to a variety of researchers from top UK universities. Each episode will feature a different academic and a discussion about their specialist work. If you want to take a deep dive into history, politics, arts, culture, religion, theology, philosophy, sociology, anthropology and lots more - this is the podcast for you. If you are interested in learning more about the topics discussed, keep listening until the end of the episode when our researcher recommends books or mater ...
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An anti-ideological guide to modern life created and hosted by Casey Franco. Each episode focuses on a phenomenon of modern life and attempts to explain it using philosophy, psychology, sociology, or semiotics so you never have to feel like you're at the mercy of gods, masters, or clout.
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What is history and who does it belong to? On the American History Unabridged Podcast, historian Mark Iverson delves into historical topics that challenge popularly accepted and taught narratives of American history. By examining Idaho, Pacific Northwest, and national history, Mark seeks to interpret the historical topics and themes generally omitted from broader narratives in the United States.
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A personal take on the life of Polish Marxist, philosopher, economist, anti-war activist and revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg. Although it will reflect on the events of her life in light of the historical context and political climate, this podcast doesn't pretend to be an academic work on the life of Rosa Luxemburg. Telling stories of her life and times, with excerpts from letters to her friends, lovers and fellow social-democrats is the real aim here. Over a century after her assassi ...
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Crawdads and Taters: Red State Rebels

Erin McCarley and Birrion Sondahl

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We are writers, activists, and leftists who come from two of the reddest states in the country, Oklahoma and Idaho. Red, in this sense, may refer to the indigenous, socialist, and labor histories of these states, as well as the right-wing fascism that they’re known for today. As rebels, we use a class-based, leftist lens to analyze current events and political issues. We talk about the many ways neoliberalism provides a breeding ground for fascism, and we examine revolutionary frameworks and ...
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Eye on the News with Eric Cochran is your daily dose of unfiltered, hard-hitting commentary on the day’s most pressing issues. Join Eric as he cuts through the noise and spin to bring you a fresh, honest, and unapologetically conservative perspective on the news, politics, and current events shaping our world.
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What would an alternative to capitalism actually look like? A Participatory Economy (also known as Parecon) is a model for a new democratic, fair and green economic system based on democratic planning of the productive commons by self-managing workplaces and neighbourhoods. It describes how a modern economy of millions of people can be organised around solidarity and cooperation instead of competition and greed. In this podcast, co-creator and economist, Robin Hahnel, is joined by fellow adv ...
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Last Tuesday was election night across New York State. The night highlighted both the enduring challenges and promise of the rising Socialist movement. In the most widely covered race of the night, Reactionary forces across the Right and Center, including AIPAC, funneled tens of millions of dollars into the 16th Congressional District to secure the…
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Featuring Abdel Razzaq Takriti, this is the FIFTEENTH episode of Thawra (Revolution), our series on Arab radicalism in the 20th century. Today’s installment addresses the Palestinian Revolution’s project in Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan—leading up to the 1970 conflict with the Jordanian state and the violent expulsion of PLO guerrillas during Black Se…
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Welcome to another episode of New Books in Chinese Studies. Today, I will be talking to Columbia University professor Ying Qian about her new book, Revolutionary Becomings: Documentary Media in Twentieth-Century China (Columbia UP, 2023). The volume enriches our understanding of media’s role in China’s revolutionary history by turning to documentar…
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This episode of the Language on the Move Podcast is part of the Life in a New Language series. Life in a New Language is a new book just out from Oxford University Press. Life in a New Language examines the language learning and settlement experiences of 130 migrants to Australia from 34 different countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin Americ…
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The 'baby boom' generation, born between the 1940s and the 1960s, is often credited with pioneering new and creative ways of relating, doing intimacy and making families. With this cohort now entering mid and later life in Britain, they are also said to be revolutionising the experience of ageing. Are the romantic practices of this 'revolutionary c…
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The Politics of Emotion: Love, Grief, and Madness in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia (Cornell University Press, 2024) by Dr. Nuria Silleras-Fernandez explores the intersection of powerful emotional states—love, melancholy, grief, and madness—with gender and political power on the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the early modern period. U…
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What we see through our windshields reflects ideas about our national identity, consumerism, and infrastructure. For better or worse, windshields have become a major frame for viewing the nonhuman world. The view from the road is one of the main ways in which we experience our environments. These vistas are the result of deliberate historical force…
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Examining the changing character of revolution around the world, The Revolutionary City: Urbanization and the Global Transformation of Rebellion (Princeton UP, 2022) focuses on the impact that the concentration of people, power, and wealth in cities exercises on revolutionary processes and outcomes. Once predominantly an urban and armed affair, rev…
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Joel, Obadiah, and Micah all prophesied not after a calamity struck but right before a potential crisis or during the crisis itself. Facing immanent catastrophe, the Jewish people had to decide where their loyalties lay. Join us as we speak with Rav Yaakov Beasley about his book Joel, Obadiah, and Micah: Facing the Storm (Maggid, 2024). He draws fr…
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Fatima, the daughter of Prophet Muhammad, has an interesting legacy, one that is often shaped by sectarian differences and tensions. The sermon of Fatima, which is the focus of Mahjabeen Dhala's Feminist Theology and Sociology of Islam: A Study of the Sermon of Fatima (Cambridge University Press, 2024), though itself riddled with questions of authe…
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Antonio Balmer and Laura Brown discuss the attempted assassination of Trump & the accelerated decline of US capitalism. This event is another step—a significant one—in the direction we’ve already been heading: one of instability, political crises, and growing political violence. Read our article: https://socialistrevolution.org/trump-assassination-…
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An unabridged recording of Why We Need Anti-Capitalist Resistance by Simon Hannah. The world is facing an unprecedented crisis with the pandemic, climate disaster, and economic crash. Extreme inequality is out of control. Resistance is happening on every continent against the capitalist system. The vision of Karl Marx for a new society is still rel…
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Contemporary thought typically places a strong emphasis on the exclusive and competitive nature of Abrahamic monotheisms. This instinct is certainly borne out by the histories of religious wars, theological polemic, and social exclusion involving Jews, Christians, and Muslims. But there is also another side to the Abrahamic coin. Even in the midst …
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"A woman in trouble" In her monograph Inland Empire (Fireflies Press, 2021), film critic Melissa Anderson explores meaning (or the impossibility thereof) in the David Lynch film of the same title. We talk everything from Laura Dern (a LOT of Laura Dern), to the Hollywood nightmare of trying to "make it in the movies," to the contradictions of film …
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San Francisco began its American life as a city largely made up of transient men, arriving from afar to participate in the gold rush and various attendant enterprises. This large population of men on the move made the new and booming city a hub of what "respectable" easterners considered vice: drinking, gambling, and sex work, among other activitie…
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The interview featured an in-depth dialogue about The Theatre of Twenty-First Century Spain (Vernon Press, 2022), a bilingual collection that examines contemporary Spanish theater and its exploration of identity, anxieties and social urgencies. The editors, Helen Freear-Papio and Candyce Crew Leonard, shared their backgrounds, interests in Spanish …
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In the early twentieth century, anarchists like Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman championed a radical vision of a world without states, laws, or private property. Militant and sometimes violent, anarchists were heroes to many working-class immigrants. But to many others, anarchism was a terrifyingly foreign ideology. Determined to crush it, gover…
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America’s waterways were once the superhighways of travel and communication. Coursing through a central line across the landscape, with tributaries connecting the South to the Great Plains and the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River meant wealth, knowledge, and power for those who could master it. In Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and …
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Since the mid-1700s, poets and scholars have been deeply entangled in the project of reinventing prophecy. Moving between literary and biblical studies, Yosefa Raz's book The Poetics of Prophecy: Modern Afterlives of a Biblical Tradition (Cambridge UP, 2023) reveals how Romantic poetry is linked to modern biblical scholarship's development. On the …
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Grounded in new archival research documenting a significant presence of foreign and racially-marked individuals in Medici Florence, Voice, Slavery, and Race in Seventeenth-Century Florence (Oxford University Press, 2024) by Dr. Emily Wilbourne argues for the relevance of such individuals to the history of Western music and for the importance of sou…
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Stefanie Coché's Psychiatric Institutions and Society: the Practice of Psychiatric Commital in the “Third Reich,” the Democratic Republic of Germany, and the Federal Republic of Germany, 1941-1963 (London: Routledge, 2024; translated by Alex Skinner) probes how the serious and sometimes fatal decision was made to admit individuals to asylums during…
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Investigative journalist Martin Lukacs from The Breach discusses his investigations into Toronto Police's Project Resolute and the secretive committee in the Ontario Attorney General's office tasked with cracking down on Palestinian solidarity activism. A beefed up hate crimes unit is backed by a committee staffed with former Prosecutors who have o…
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Richard Seymour, author of a recent rundown for New Left Review's Sidecar blog, discusses the British election. Trita Parsi talks about the Iranian election. Finally, we remember Jane McAlevey with a 2017 Behind the News interview. See a catalog of further interviews here: https://lbo-news.com/2024/07/11/jane-mcalevey-the-behind-the-news-interviews…
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Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky was a powerful figure in Ukrainian history and an influence in European politics in the second half of the 1600's. His most controversial act was signing an agreement with the Russian Tsar, the consequences of which have reverberated into modern Ukraine. His legacy is also shadowed by Cossack actions against the Jews and t…
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What would it be like if scholars presented their research in sound rather than in print? Better yet, what if we could hear them in the act of their research and analysis, pulling different historical sounds from the archives and rubbing them against one another in an audio editor? In today’s episode, we get to find out what such an innovative scho…
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Imagine that you volunteer for the clinical trial of an experimental drug. The only direct benefit of participating is that you will receive up to $5,175. You must spend twenty nights literally locked in a research facility. You will be told what to eat, when to eat, and when to sleep. You will share a bedroom with several strangers. Who are you, a…
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The 2024 Solomon Islands elections were surprisingly peaceful. The deepening economic inequalities, widespread corruption, rogue demagogues manipulating the mob, and other aspects such as the heated debate about the increasing presence and influence of China, did not result in the kind of riots that hit this Pacific Island country twice in the prev…
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How the Palestine Liberation Organization Research Center informed the PLO's relationship to Zionism and Israel In September 1982, the Israeli military invaded West Beirut and Israel-allied Lebanese militiamen massacred Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps. Meanwhile, Israeli forces also raided the Palestine Liberation Organization R…
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In 1920, W. E. B. Du Bois and the NAACP founders published The Brownies’ Book: A Monthly Magazine for Children of the Sun. A century later, The New Brownies' Book: A Love Letter to Black Families (Chronicle Books, 2023) recreates the very first publication created for Black youth in 1920 into a sensational anthology. Expanding on the mission of the…
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A great movie that is very difficult movie to recommend because of its subject matter, Paul Schrader’s Auto Focus (2002), the story of TV-star Bob Crane, is another of Schrader’s portraits of a man whose self-destruction we watch with admiration for the writing and unease at what we’re seeing. It’s a combination of The Lost Weekend, Reefer Madness,…
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Peoples & Things host Lee Vinsel talks with Paula Bialski, an Associate Professor for Digital Sociology at the University of St. Gallen in St. Gallen, Switzerland, about her recent book, Middle Tech: Software Work and the Culture of Good Enough (Princeton UP, 2024). The pair talk about the art of ethnographic study of software work, and how, maybe,…
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Soul is one of those concepts that is often evoked, but rarely satisfactorily defined. In The Meaning of Soul: Black Music and Resilience Since the 1960s (Duke University Press 2020), Emily J. Lordi takes on the challenge of explaining “soul,” through a book that zooms in and out between sweeping ideas about suffering and resilience in Black cultur…
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All too often, the history of early modern Africa is told from the perspective of outsiders. In his book A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (University of Chicago Press, 2019), Toby Green draws upon a range of underutilized sources to describe the evolution of West Africa over a period of four…
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This interview with Shawn(ta) Smith-Cruz about Grabbing Tea: Queer Conversations on Identity and Libraries and Grabbing Tea: Queer Conversations on Archives and Practice (available in 2024 from the Litwin Books Series on Gender and Sexuality in Library and Information Studies) explores how queerness is centered within library and archival theory an…
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In Tip of the Spear: Land, Labor, and US Settler Militarism in Guåhan, 1944–1962 (Cornell University Press, 2023), Dr. Alfred Peredo Flores argues that the US occupation of the island of Guåhan (Guam), one of the most heavily militarised islands in the western Pacific Ocean, was enabled by a process of settler militarism. During World War II and th…
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Kristin J. Jacobson In her new book, The American Adrenaline Narrative (University of Georgia Press), Kristin Jacobson considers the nature of perilous outdoor adventure tales, their gendered biases, and how they simultaneously promote and hinder ecological sustainability. To explore these themes, Jacobson defines and compares adrenaline narratives…
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Listen to this interview of Istvan David, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Department of Computing and Software, Faculty of Engineering, McMaster University, Canada; and, Houari Sahraoui, Full Professor, Department of Computer Science and Operations Research, University of Montreal, Canada. We talk about their coauthored paper "Digital Twin…
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Last week, I had the privilege to talk with Dr. Kristen R. Ghodsee about her most recent book Second World, Second Sex: Socialist Women's Activism and Global Solidarity during the Cold War (Duke University Press, 2019) and the behind-the-scene details of its making. Ghodsee is a professor in Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pe…
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Numerous Iron-Age nomadic alliances flourished along the 5000-mile Eurasian steppe route. From Crimea to the Mongolian grassland, nomadic image-making was rooted in metonymically conveyed zoomorphic designs, creating an alternative ecological reality. The nomadic elite nucleus embraced this elaborate image system to construct collective memory in r…
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Myths about the powers held by the United States are often supported by the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, which derives its logic from the interpretation of a document that the US itself developed. Therefore, when pressure is placed on a specific legal precedent, the shallowness of its validity is revealed. Dr. Mónica A. Jiménez accomplishes t…
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A short, thought-provoking book about what happens to our online identities after we die. These days, so much of our lives takes place online—but what about our afterlives? Thanks to the digital trails that we leave behind, our identities can now be reconstructed after our death. In fact, AI technology is already enabling us to “interact” with the …
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Throughout US history, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people have been pathologized, victimized, and criminalized. Reports of lynching, burning, or murdering of LGBTQ people have been documented for centuries. Prior to the 1970s, LGBTQ people were deemed as having psychological disorders and subsequently subject to electrosh…
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In the vaunted annals of America’s founding, Boston has long been held up as an exemplary “city upon a hill” and the “cradle of liberty” for an independent United States. Wresting this iconic urban center from these misleading, tired clichés, The City-State of Boston: The Rise and Fall of an Atlantic Power (Princeton University Press, 2019), highli…
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Endlessly fascinating, dark and bright, The Red Shoes (1948) employs every branch of the cinematic arts to sweep the audience off its feet, invigorated by the transcendence of art itself, only to leave them with troubling questions. Representing the climax of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's celebrated run of six exceptional feature films, t…
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Listen to the Sat. July 13, 2024 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This episode features our PANW report with dispatches on the attempted assassination of former United States President Donald Trump at a campaign rally in Butler, Pennsylvania; there has been…
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