Sociologi public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
From Plato to quantum physics, Walter Benjamin to experimental poetry, Frantz Fanon to the history of political radicalism, The Podcast for Social Research is a crucial part of our mission to forge new, organic paths for intellectual work in the twenty-first century: an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring members of the Institute, and occasional guests, conversing about a wide variety of intellectual issues, some perennial, some newly pressing. Each episode centers on a different top ...
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
inSocialWork is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice, practice to research. inSocialWork features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.
 
Aloha, Welcome to the TrueLife podcast. Take a deep breath because we are going to take a deep dive into the depths of the unconscious mind. Psychology, philosophy, psychedelic research and social engineering are but a few of the locations we will be investigating. Tactical empathy, purple dawn theory, beautiful beaches, & book reviews because some times you get shown the light in the strangest of places if you look at it right.
 
Join your host, Jonathan Singer, Ph.D., LCSW in an exploration of all things social work, including direct practice, human behavior in the social environment, research, policy, field work, social work education, and everything in between. Big names talking about bigger ideas. The purpose of the podcast is to present information in a user-friendly format. Although the intended audience is social workers, the information will be useful to anyone in a helping profession (including psychology, n ...
 
Economists say the way we work has become so stressful it’s now the fifth leading cause of death. Our mission is to find a better way. Explore the art and science of living a full and healthy life with behavioral and social science researchers who can help us better understand what drives our human experiences, and how to change. Better Life Lab is a co-production from New America and Slate.
 
A political podcast hosted by Max Klinger, featuring interviews with well-known guests. Things we are generally in favour of: free thought, free discussion and reasoned arguments. Things we are generally against: mindless groupthink, hysterical social media outrage mobs and illiberalism. 'The essence of the independent mind lies not in what it thinks, but how it thinks.' - Christopher Hitchens.
 
Highly Inspired presents a variety of topics relating to life in the 21st century. We relish technology, business, science, and entertainment, and encourage all opportunities for growth of the mind. The show's hosts, Jordan and Ella, dissect relevant current events, pop culture, and psychology, but with a comedic twist. Join us on the endless journey of self-development. Explore ideas. Be a generalist.
 
Join a group of six women in social sciences in their aim to increase visibility of inspiring social scientists and of cutting-edge research focusing on ethnic, cultural, and migration-related diversity. Each episode two hosts invite one outstanding scientist to discuss their past (personal path into academia), the present (a research article that has recently inspired them in their work), and the future (recent developments and paradigm shifts in the world of academia and social sciences).
 
Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
The rapid gentrification of Black and brown neighborhoods in urban areas by predominantly upper-class white and other white-adjacent peoples is largely facilitated by urban redevelopment and revitalization projects. These projects often usher in aesthetics that seek to attract those understood as desirable populations. But what happens when the aes…
 
It has been a very tough decade for the sociology job market, and faculty jobs are getting tougher to land. At the same time, doctoral students often feel discouraged from pursuing a career outside of the academy. One viable response may be to reconsider old attitudes about a career in applied sociology. In this episode, we discuss the applied fiel…
 
Is the COVID-19 pandemic the death of tourism? Is the Venetian in Vegas authentic? We have a guest episode for you today with Marta Soligo, who will take us on a tour of the sociology of tourism, the creation of culture, celebrity deaths, dark tourism, and much more. Even though tourism may be for leisure and relaxation, it remains one of the large…
 
Three friends that happen to be social workers discuss current social/social work issues from their front room via Zoom. Your favourite trio of social workers are back with another episode. In this episode Nadia, Fran and Eugene have a discussion about the recent Race report in the UK. The report concludes that 'the UK is not deliberately rigged ag…
 
Become a Patron We discuss the nihilist subculture in Russia in the 19th century and the significance of Ivan Turgenev's novel "Fathers and Sons." Other Videos Subscribe on YouTube Twitter @RevAndIdeology Reddit r/RevolutionAndIdeology Discord Facebook Become a Patron! Subscribe! #mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Ari…
 
Panoramic and provocative in its scope, John Geoffrey Scott and Christian Grov's The Routledge Handbook of Male Sex Work, Culture, and Society (Routledge, 2021) is the definitive guide to contemporary issues associated with male sex work and a must read for those who study masculinities, male sexuality, sexual health, and sexual cultures. This grou…
 
Western culture has endlessly represented the ways in which love miraculously erupts in people's lives, the mythical moment in which one knows someone is destined for us; the feverish waiting for a phone call or an email, the thrill that runs our spine at the mere thought of him or her. Yet, a culture that has so much to say about love is virtually…
 
Across the past year, and now as the murder trial of Derek Chauvin unfolds with Minneapolis in fresh pain and turmoil, we return again to the grounding insights of Resmaa Menakem. He is a Minneapolis-based therapist and trauma specialist who activates the wisdom of elders, and very new science, about how all of us carry in our bodies the history an…
 
Across the past year, and now as the murder trial of Derek Chauvin unfolds with Minneapolis in fresh pain and turmoil, we return again to the grounding insights of Resmaa Menakem. He is a Minneapolis-based therapist and trauma specialist who activates the wisdom of elders, and very new science, about how all of us carry in our bodies the history an…
 
In this episode, Shruti and Virginia Postrel discuss her latest book, “The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World.” They talk about different methods of dyeing, spinning as a feminine occupation, the textile trade in the 17th and 18th centuries, how technological changes disrupted the industry and much more. Postrel is an author, colum…
 
Antisemitism is a deep rooted problem with a long history. Last year the Labour Party in Britain found itself in a quandary over this issue when a Human Rights and Equality Commission enquiry found that it had committed unlawful acts and had to change. Luciana Berger and Julian Hargreaves discuss antisemitism... Like this podcast? Please help us by…
 
Apps have transformed dating from a mysterious adventure into a daily chore. Young, single, college-educated women are sick and tired of competing for a shrinking supply of guys. And marriage-material men, long expected to take the lead when it comes to asking women out, are suddenly balking at making the first move, fearing they'll come across as …
 
Political Theorist and activist Dana Mill’s latest new book, Rosa Luxemburg (Reaktion Books, 2020), is part of an extensive series of books published by Reaktion Books, Ltd, which focuses both on the ideas or creations and the lives of many leading cultural figures of the modern period. These volumes are not long, but they are thorough, and they he…
 
In an era of increasing social isolation, platforms like Facebook and Twitter are among the most important tools we have to understand each other. We use social media as a mirror to decipher our place in society but, as Christopher A. Bail explains, it functions more like a prism that distorts our identities, empowers status-seeking extremists, and…
 
Successful word-coinages--those that stay in currency for a good long time--tend to conceal their beginnings. We take them at face value and rarely when and where they were first minted. Engaging, illuminating, and authoritative, Ralph Keyes's The Hidden History of Coined Words (Oxford University Press, 2021) explores the etymological underworld of…
 
Economist, data journalist, and best-selling author Seth Stephens-Davidowitz uses data from the internet to gain new insights into the human psyche. In his new book Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are (HarperCollins, 2017), Seth has used Google searches to measure racism, self-induced aborti…
 
Apps have transformed dating from a mysterious adventure into a daily chore. Young, single, college-educated women are sick and tired of competing for a shrinking supply of guys. And marriage-material men, long expected to take the lead when it comes to asking women out, are suddenly balking at making the first move, fearing they'll come across as …
 
What are some of the dark sides of fraternity life? Dick’s guest is lawyer David K. Eastlick, was the executive director for an international fraternity for 29 years. He now testifies as an expert in fraternity law and also advocates to end hazing rituals. The post Hazing and Sexual Assault in Fraternities appeared first on Insights with Dick Goldb…
 
Violence against women in sports is a common topic in the news nowadays, with allegations of abuse and misconduct coming to light. Criminal and deviant behaviors in sports, from basketball to the NFL, happens more often than you think but what are the consequences of such behaviors? How do the institutions and actors involved respond to allegations…
 
What many people wrote off as “conspiracy theories” months ago is now finally here with corporate and government’s effort to enforce a vaccine passport. You might be thinking, “What’s the big deal? Aren’t some types of vaccines already required for international travel?” That may be true, but there has never been all-encompassing documentation to d…
 
The miners’ strike of 1984-85 can be considered the last great battle of the organised industrial working class in the UK. The defeat of the strike led to deindustrialisation, the rapid closure of pits, the redundancy of the miners and the hollowing out of mining communities which impacts politics to this day. In this talk, Robert Gildea examines t…
 
Oksana Kis’s Survival as Victory: Ukrainian Women in the Gulag (Harvard Series in Ukrainian Studies, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University Press, 2021) fundamentally contributes to the Gulag studies through its essential intervention into the conventional framework of researching the Gulag as a system of measures to control the individua…
 
Anita Hardon's Chemical Youth: Navigating Uncertainty in Search of the Good Life (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) explores how young people engage with chemical substances in their everyday lives. It builds upon and supplements a large body of literature on young people’s use of drugs and alcohol to highlight the subjectivities and socialities that chemi…
 
Going way back to our very first episode, we’re talking all about tummy time. You know, that fun activity where you put a baby on its stomach to strengthen muscles and minimize the risk of getting a flat head. The one that makes most babies cry hysterically. Now research is here to inform how we can promote this very necessary activity without all …
 
What are the psychological ramifications of having a narcissist in your life? How do you protect yourself from the chaotic world of the clinical narcissist? Listen in as Professor Michael Drane retells the tragic death of Lisa Steinberg, the victim of an excessively narcissistic parent, as well as the origin of “Battered Wife-Syndrome”. This is a r…
 
Global crises cause big changes and reveal deep structural weaknesses. In this special interview series from the RSA its chief executive, Matthew Taylor, puts a range of practitioners on the spot - from scholars to business leaders, politicians to journalists - by asking for one big idea to help build effective bridges to our new future. Melanie Ch…
 
Allison B. Wolf's Just Immigration in the Americas: A Feminist Account (Rowman and Littlefield, 2020) proposes a pioneering, interdisciplinary, feminist approach to immigration justice, which defines immigration justice as being about identifying and resisting global oppression in immigration structures, policies, practices, and norms. In contrast …
 
Drawing on a decade of ethnographic research in the Indian city of Mumbai, Waiting Town: Life in Transit and Mumbai's Other World-Class Histories (Association for Asian Studies, 2020) is an unconventional little book – experimental in form – about how we come to know the worlds about which we write. The narrative follows the author’s fieldnotes dia…
 
Telling stories: that sounds innocuous enough. But for the first chronicle in the Japanese vernacular, A Tale of Flowering Fortunes (Eiga monogatari), there was more to worry about than a good yarn. The health of the community was at stake. Flowering Tales: Women Exorcising History in Heian Japan (Harvard University Press, 2020) is the first extens…
 
Welcome to Awesome Etiquette, where we explore modern etiquette through the lens of consideration, respect and honesty. On today’s show we take your questions on a modern wedding quandary, a very overly intrusive neighbor, double last name confusion, and addressing envelopes. For Awesome Etiquette sustaining members our question is about saying you…
 
Today on New Books in History, a channel on the New Books Network we are joined by Kenneth L. Shonk, Professor of History at University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse to talk about his new book, Ireland’s New Traditionalists: Fianna Fail Republicanism and Gender, 1926 – 38, out this year, 2021, with Cork University Press. The creation of Fianna Fáil in 1926…
 
In this episode of the Social-Engineer podcast, Chris Hadnagy and Maxie Reynolds are joined by Dr. Ida Ngambeki, an Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Technology at Purdue University. Listen in as they discuss importance of empathy and the best ways to teach social engineering. April 12, 2021 00:00 – Intro Join Social-Engineering on Sl…
 
April is Autism Awareness Month, a global event to improve the understanding of this condition, especially in the workplace. What unforeseen contributions can autistic people and other employees make in the working environment? With Ed Kessler are Simon Baron-Cohen and Catherine Connelly to discuss the subject... Like this podcast? Please help us b…
 
Since President Nixon coined the phrase, the "War on Drugs" has presented an important change in how people view and discuss criminal justice practices and drug laws. The term evokes images of militarization, punishment, and violence, as well as combat and the potential for victory. It is no surprise then that questions such as whether the "War on …
 
Imagine a rodeo rider atop a bucking bronco, hat in hand, straining to remain astride. Is the rider in your mind's eye white? Is the person male? Popular imaginings and high level, televised, professional rodeo circuits have created a stereotyped image of who rodeo is by and for, but it is far too limited an image, and one that does not reflect rea…
 
Imagine a rodeo rider atop a bucking bronco, hat in hand, straining to remain astride. Is the rider in your mind's eye white? Is the person male? Popular imaginings and high level, televised, professional rodeo circuits have created a stereotyped image of who rodeo is by and for, but it is far too limited an image, and one that does not reflect rea…
 
A striking number of women, and especially moms, who have left the U.S. labor force since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. In this podcast episode, labor economist Kathryn Anne Edwards talks about some of the patterns she’s seen around why women are leaving the labor force and how the lack of support for working parents could roll back the ga…
 
“Remember,” Bryan Doerries likes to say in both physical and virtual gatherings, “you are not alone in this room — and you are not alone across time.” With his public health project, Theater of War, he is activating an old alchemy for our young century. Ancient stories, and texts that have stood the test of time, can be portals to honest and dignif…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login