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An ongoing series of long-form conversations with individuals at the forefront of exploration and adventure in which filmmaker Matt Pycroft speaks to the most knowledgeable, accomplished and respected voices in the field. From mountaineers to wildlife cinematographers, environmental activists to polar photographers, The Adventure Podcast brings you up close and personal with those who live extraordinary lives. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-adventure-podcast.
 
Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts is a forum in which artists, writers, and scholars from North Africa, the United States, and beyond can present their ongoing and innovative research on and cultural activities in the Maghrib. The podcasts are based on lectures or performances before live audiences across the Maghrib. Aiming to project the scientific and cultural dynamism of research in and on North Africa into the classroom, we too hope to reach a wider audience across the globe.
 
Having, on his first voyage, discovered Australia, Cook still had to contend with those who maintained that the Terra Australians Incognita (the unknown Southern Continent) was a reality. To finally settle the issue, the British Admiralty sent Cook out again into the vast Southern Ocean with two sailing ships totalling only about 800 tons. Listen as Cook, equipped with one of the first chronometers, pushes his small vessel not merely into the Roaring Forties or the Furious Fifties but become ...
 
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Episode 121: Libya: Continuities and Discontinuities of Political Order After 2011 To what extent is the political instability witnessed in Libya since 2011 an inheritance of the ousted regime of Mu'ammar al-Gaddafi, which ruled the country for over four decades? In his new article in Middle East Law and Governance, "Of Conflict and Collapse: Rethi…
 
Épisode 120: La dimension berbère dans les manuscrits arabes du Maghreb. Essai de lecture de quelques documents Constituant une ressource appréciable pour les sciences humaines et sociales, les manuscrits berbères écrits en caractères arabes sont répartis un peu partout dans les pays du Maghreb. Un bon nombre de ces manuscrits se trouve dans des bi…
 
The United States Navy returns to Antarctica, this time under Admiral Cruzen, though Admiral Byrd was there and waving hard at the cameras and yelling that we shouldn't forget that he's the mayor of Antarctica and firsted all the firsts. While not the first fatal air accident in Antarctica, the George 1 becomes the first fatal air accident in Antar…
 
Episode 119:الحدود المجتمعية: قراءة في أشكال التمزق ومقترح في سبل الاندماج يتتبع ماهر الزغلامي في هذه الحوارية المعنونة بـ"الحدود المجتمعية: قراءة في أشكال التمزّق و مقترح في سبل الاندماج"، أشكال الانقسام الاجتماعي التي تعيد إنتاج نفسها باستمرار ضمن نظام تسلسلي للشروخ المجتمعية. وهو ما يحاول قراءة تمظهراته في المجالين الثقافي والديني، حيث يماثل بين…
 
Episode 118:الديناميكية الحضرية والتحولات السوسيواقتصادية بالتجمعات الحدودية الواقعة على المحور برج باجي مختار- تمنارست تعد الاقاليم الحدودية الجنوبية للجزائر مجالات جغرافية ديناميكية سوسيواقتصادية معتبرة، بحيث تشهد التجمعات الحضرية الحدودية الواقعة على المحور برج باجي مختار - تمنراست تحولات مجالية واجتماعية واقتصادية متسارعة. هذا المحور مجال طبيعي…
 
Henry Fletcher is a facilitator, storyteller and maker. As a facilitator, Henry helps people immerse themselves in nature. As a storyteller, he seeks a positive narrative around our relationship with our surroundings and the environment. As a maker, he creates beautiful cairns – a pile of stones, which when carefully structured, can last centuries.…
 
Episode 117: Description de quelques manuscrits mystico-religieux de Kabylie. Constituant une ressource appréciable pour les sciences humaines et sociales, les manuscrits berbères écrits en caractères arabes sont répartis un peu partout dans les pays du Maghreb. Un bon nombre de ces manuscrits se trouve dans des bibliothèques publiques mais beaucou…
 
An ultra-endurance cyclist, Emily Chappell started her biking adventures as a cycle courier in London before cycling from Wales to Japan. The cycling feats didn't end there and in 2016 Emily was the fastest woman home in the 2016 Transcontinental Race. In this episode Emily draws on her Masters in Gender Studies as she discusses the importance of n…
 
Episode 116: Ahmed Cherkaoui in Warsaw: Polish-Moroccan Artistic Relations during the Cold War, 1955-1980 In this podcast, Dr. Przemysław Strożek reflects on Polish-Moroccan artistic relations between 1955 and 1980. He situates them within the broader historical phenomenon of a political and cultural rapprochement between countries of the Eastern B…
 
David Yarrow is a fine art photographer, conservationist and author. David is best known for his iconic monochrome wildlife photography, as well as for capturing celebrity portraits including Cindy Crawford and Cara Delevingne. David has many boasts, from taking the historic image of Maradona at the 1986 World Cup to his work in wildlife conservati…
 
Episode 115: Les significations profanes de la pandémie Covid-19 à Oran Dans ce podcast, Pr. Mohamed Mebtoul présente les résultats de son enquête menée à Oran, avec la participation de l’Association Santé Sidi El Houari et L’Observatoire Régional de la Santé d’Oran sur les significations profanes de la pandémie Covid-19. D'après lui, les mots, l…
 
Reza Pakravan is an explorer, filmmaker and writer. In a past life Reza was working the 9 to 5 but today he documents his epic adventures. From travelling the full length of Africa via the Sahel region to earning a Guinness World Record for crossing the Sahara Desert by bicycle. In this episode Reza is incredibly frank about the commercialisation o…
 
Episode 114: Entretien avec Dr. Asma Nouira : Les relations entre l'État et la religion en Tunisie Dans ce podcast, Dr. Asma Nouira présente ses recherches sur les relations entre l'État et la religion en Tunisie. Ayant commencé avec une analyse du rôle du Mufti de la République en Tunisie, le spectre de cette recherche s'est élargi pour inclure le…
 
The Tabarin mooted, Marr demurred Base E arises on Stonington Island, five nautical miles from the BGLE hut on Barry Island but two hundred yards from the Johnny-come-five-years-ago East Base. Ted Bingham leads the first iteration of the FIDS and sets the tone for subsequent cohorts. Scones, rum, freshies and the sort of treats that make Brits wave…
 
George Butler is an award-winning artist and illustrator who specialises in documenting reportage and current affairs in ink rather than with a camera. In 2012 he walked into Syria from Turkey where he started to capture the war-damaged town of Azaz as a guest of the rebel Free Syrian Army. Since then, his work has taken him to Afghanistan, Ghana, …
 
Episode 113: À la découverte de copies manuscrites d'une même œuvre : Le 'Kitâb al-siyar' de Wisyânî, un auteur Ibâdite Nord-Africain du 6ème AH. / 12ème Constituant une ressource appréciable pour les sciences humaines et sociales, les manuscrits berbères écrits en caractères arabes sont répartis un peu partout dans les pays du Maghreb. Un bon nomb…
 
Describing himself as a "biologist with a lot of other interests", Dr Niall McCann works on the frontline of conservation, and in his spare time has skied across Greenland, rowed the Atlantic and cycled through the Himalayas. In this episode Niall talks to Matt about the accessibility of adventure if you're willing to look for it, his recovery from…
 
Episode 112: Terra Incognita: Mapping the Afterlives of French Nuclear Imperialism in the Sahara How can aesthetic works and humanities training help us to apprehend the danger that nuclear toxicity poses to ecological health and human life? Taking off from the premise that French maps of the Sahara Desert have long served to enable military occupa…
 
Steph Jeavons is an author, journalist and adventurer from Wales. The first person to circumnavigate the globe and ride a motorbike on all seven continents, Steph has always led an unconventional and adventurous life, embracing even the ‘darker adventures’ from her youth. At the age of twenty she found herself in prison – looking out of her cell wi…
 
Episode 111: Non-State Actors and State-Building in Libya after 2011 In this podcast, Professor Amal El-Obeidi discusses power struggles in Libya, as well as the country's instability since 2011. In the absence of a central state after the fall of Qaddafi's regime, processes of national reconciliation and transitional justice have been ineffective.…
 
Leon McCarron is a writer, broadcaster and adventurer - originally from Northern Ireland, he now calls Iraq home. Leon’s championing of ‘slow travel’ has taken him across China on foot, walking through the Empty Quarter Desert and riding across Patagonia on horseback. Now based in Iraq, he uses storytelling to address the myriad misconceptions arou…
 
Episode 110: Centralization and Decentralization in the Middle East and North Africa In this podcast on local governance in Morocco and Jordan, Dr. Janine A. Clark, Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, examines how decentralization and centralization mechanisms are implemented at the municipal level. She asks why Morocco dec…
 
Robert Swan is the first person in history to reach both the North and South Poles on foot, and undertook both of these pioneering expeditions in an era before GPS or satellite phones. He has gone on to dedicate his life to protecting Antarctica, and to preserving it as a unique natural reserve for science and peace. In Episode 061, Robert shares h…
 
Episode 109: Bread and Circuits: Illness, Food, and the Course of Empire in Algeria In the midst of ongoing drought, famine, and epidemic disease in the 1860s, a few settlers in Algiers got sick with a mysterious illness. Investigations determined that the culprit was construction debris from the Haussmannization of Paris, shipped across imperial c…
 
Cal Flyn is a writer and journalist who lives on Orkney, off the north coast of Scotland. Her latest book tells the story of a dozen abandoned places around the world, from Chernobyl to the volcanic Caribbean, and particularly at how nature reclaims and rebounds after humans leave. Cal’s conversation with Matt explores the peculiar connection human…
 
Episode 108: Anti-Elitism in Tunisia: Condition of Political Success? In this podcast, Associate Professor Tarek Kahlaoui reflects on populism in the post-revolutionary context of Tunisia. Kahlaoui questions the idea of an umbrella definition of Tunisian populism, a misleading term that overlooks important nuances. He asks whether populism is a rea…
 
Episode 107: الشعبوية: قراءة حول المثال التونسي في هذا التسجيل الصوتي، يناقش الأستاذ محمد شفيق صرصار آثار الخطاب الشعبوي الذي عرفه المشهد السياسي التونسي منذ 2011 على نتائج الانتخابات المتعاقبة في البلاد، كما يربط هذه الظاهرة ببروز الشخصيات السياسية الشعبوية في الإنتخابات الرئاسية والتشريعية ل 2019. ويأتي الأستاذ صرصار على العوامل التي أعدت المناخ …
 
Episode 106: Populism and the Crisis of the Republic In this podcast, Professor Charles Tripp argues that populism is a form of collective politics that embodies distinct ideas, particularly those about popular sovereignty. Populism, he stresses, claims to communicate and respond directly to the political base – the people – by passing increasingly…
 
Acclaimed journalist and author Ed Ceasar has written on subjects as varied as gorillas in the Congo, an imprisoned Russian billionaire and the world’s longest tennis match. Most recently, his book 'The Moth and the Mountain' tells the extraordinary tale of Maurice Wilson's 1935 attempt on Everest. In Episode 059, Ed shares his stories – and his lo…
 
Episode 105: Jedba, Jinns, and Hāl: Bodily Modalities of Mental-Emotional Health and 'Musico-thérapie' in Algeria In this podcast, Dr. Tamara Turner illustrates the inextricable relationship between mental-emotional health, sound, and consciousness through a spectrum of 'psychological' states that are locally mapped in Algeria as bodily modalities:…
 
Episode 104: Of Jinn Theory and Germ Theory: Translating Bacteriological Medicine and Islamic Law in Algeria In this podcast, focusing on colonial Algeria c. 1890 to 1940, Dr. Hannah-Louise Clark explores how Muslim intellectuals and ordinary people learned about microbes and responded to bacteriological medicine. Many Algerians feared invisible sp…
 
In which Carla explores the Twelve Days of Christmas and why we send Christmas cards, and reads a Victorian horror story by F. Marion Crawford. Christmas episodes: 32: What the Dickens 47: Victorian Christmas: The Goblin and the Paw 65: Happy Christmas Chaos 66: Deck the Hall with Horror Sources and Suggested Reading: “The Doll’s Ghost”, F. Marion …
 
Episode 103: Memoirs, Memory, and the History of the Tunisian Left In this podcast, Dr.Idriss Jebari contemplates the outpouring of memory from the former leftists of the Perspectives movement, following the 2011 Tunisian Revolution. In a series of published memoirs, the likes of Gilbert Naccache, Fethi Ben Haj Yahia and others take their readers f…
 
Episode 102: Conversation with Lisa Anderson and Tarek Kahlaoui: Reflections on Tunisia's State Building History and Contemporary Democratization Experience In this discussion, Lisa Anderson and Tarek Kahlaoui reflect on Tunisia's post-independence state-building history and the country's contemporary democratization experience. The conversation dr…
 
Episode 101: "Willis from Tunis, 10 ans et toujours vivant!" - Entretien avec Nadia Khiari Le chat Willis from Tunis est né jeudi le 13 janvier 2011 au moment où le président tunisien déchu, Ben Ali, prononçait un discours dans lequel il promettait, entre autres, la liberté d'expression. Cette chronique graphique était pour l'auteur un moyen de par…
 
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