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Language exchange is a fun and free way to improve your Japanese. But to do it successfully, you should consider a few things.In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae and Ian discuss tips and practical expressions you can use for language exchange sessions.For more details, check out: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/language-exchange/…
 
In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae and David discuss why e-books can be great materials for Japanese learners, all their tips for buying Japanese e-books, and their favorite Japanese e-book stores.After listening to the episode, check out: https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/how-to-buy-japanese-ebooks/…
 
よつばと! (Yotsuba&!) is a Japanese slice-of-life comedy manga series that's become very popular in the Japanese learning community.In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae and Ian talk about how much they love Yotsuba&! and why it's such a great manga series to pick up for Japanese learners, especially beginners.After listening to this episode, check o…
 
In this episode, Emily and Kanae discuss “yuri,” the Japanese genre of women-loving women (wlw) romantic relationships. Check out this episode to learn a brief history of yuri, famous examples of yuri, and Emily’s yuri/LGBTQ+ recommendations, such as: 少女革命ウテナ (Revolutionary Girl Utena) やがて君になる (Bloom Into You) しまなみ誰そ彼 (Our Dreams at Dusk) … and mor…
 
In this episode, Ian Battaglia, a Japanese resource review writer at Tofugu and an enthusiastic Japanese learner who’s still actively working his way to the advanced level, discusses all kinds of things he wishes he knew when he was a beginner Japanese learner. Ian covers topics like:- Learning Japanese is not a race! Go at your own “sustainable” p…
 
In this episode, Emily Suvannasankha, a Japan category writer at Tofugu and an enthusiastic Japanese learner of over a decade, discusses all kinds of things she wishes she knew when she was a beginner Japanese learner. Even more, she also shares tips and advice that she got from interviewing her friends who study Japanese.Emily covers topics like:-…
 
In this episode, David Honeycutt, a Japanese resource review writer at Tofugu and an enthusiastic Japanese learner of over a decade, discusses all kinds of things he wishes he knew when he was a beginner Japanese learner. David covers topics like:- How to follow some sort of curriculum even if you’re a self-learner- The power of SRS (Spaced Repetit…
 
In this episode, David Honeycutt, a Japanese resource review writer at Tofugu and an enthusiastic Japanese learner of over a decade, discusses all kinds of things he wishes he knew when he was a beginner Japanese learner. David covers topics like: How to follow some sort of curriculum even if you’re a self-learner The power of SRS (Spaced Repetitio…
 
The MEXT Research Scholarship is Japan's government-funded program that will let you do a free master's and cover living expenses to boot. ...Sounds too good to be true? Well, Emily is living proof that it's not. In this episode, Kanae and Rachel welcome Tofugu’s new writer Emily as a co-host and talk about her experience with the scholarship progr…
 
This is the third and final episode in our three-part mini-series on the Japanese particles は and が. In this episode, Kanae and Jenny turn their attention to the particle が, including the effects of switching it out with は in cases like すしが好き and すしは好き. Join us for some food-obsessed examples of が usage. For more details about は and が, check out Je…
 
Put your hands up if you agree that は and が are up there with the most confusing aspects of Japanese grammar. Part of the confusion is that they're often conflated as being more or less the same thing. And while that's intuitive in lots of situations, it can be confusing if you come up against an example where they add a different nuance, or where …
 
This is the second episode in our three-part mini-series on the ins and outs of the Japanese particles は and が. In this episode, Kanae and Jenny focus particularly on the particle は, and answer some more questions from listeners, getting only a little bit sidetracked by spelling reforms, umlauts, and ASMR along the way. Are you all set? 準備はいいですか?…
 
彼 (kare) and 彼女 (kanojo) are Japanese third-person pronouns, meaning "he" and "she." Even though they're the equivalents of these essential English words, Japanese speakers don't really use 彼 and 彼女 in conversation.In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae, Jenny, and Rachel, discuss the history of 彼 and 彼女, what you sound like when you use them, the…
 
もったいない (mottainai) is a unique Japanese word that articulates the sense of regret, guilt, and sorrow you feel for wasting all sorts of things — food, physical objects, time, opportunities, and potential. In this episode, Kanae and Jenny (big fans of mottainai) talk about the nuances of the word, as well as Japan's cultural and religious views that …
 
Although んだ (nda) and んです(ndesu) are very common ways of ending Japanese sentences, they can be challenging for English speakers to understand because there's no equivalent to these in English.In this episode, Kanae and Rachel discuss what these sentence enders really are (I mean, what the heck is the ん anyway, right?), and how they are used.After …
 
Although んだ (nda) and んです (ndesu) are very common ways of ending Japanese sentences, they can be challenging for English speakers to understand because there's no equivalent to these in English. In this episode, Kanae and Rachel discuss what these sentence enders really are (I mean, what the heck is the ん anyway, right?), and how they are used. Aft…
 
The particles に (Ni) and で (De) can both be used to specify locations, but each serves a different purpose. If you ever wondered how they're different, or you've been using them without knowing the difference, this episode is for you!In this episode, Kanae and Rachel discuss the basic difference and illustrate it using examples and quizzes. They ev…
 
A Japanese second-person pronoun, お前 (omae) has different sides of personality just like other personal pronouns. This is the third episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Kanae, Mami, and Rachael discuss the various nuances of お前, including how grandpas and grandmas always use it as a way to show aff…
 
A Japanese second-person pronoun, 君 (kimi) carries different nuances. It could be friendly, poetic, endearing, or even condescending (!). This is the second episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, which features Kanae, Mami, and Rachel, discuss the various nuances of 君, including how 君 is the perfect …
 
Have you ever wondered if the Japanese second-person pronoun, あなた (anata), is rude or polite? This is the first episode of our Japanese second-person pronoun series. In this episode, the Tofugu crew, Cameron and Kanae, try to clear the myth of あなた being rude or being polite. They also discuss how and where people actually use あなた.…
 
This is the fourth episode of our What Should I Call "You"? series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Cameron and Ma…
 
This is the third episode of our What Should I Call "You"? series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Cameron and Mam…
 
This is the second episode of our "What Should I Call 'You'?" series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Jenny and Ra…
 
This is the first episode of our "What Should I Call 'You'?" series.In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (which includes everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversation. In this series, the Tofugu crew discusses different ways to refer to others without using pronouns.In this episode, Kanae, Jenny and Rac…
 
This is the first episode of our What Should I Call "You"? series. In Japanese, pronouns for "others" (such as everything besides "I" — "you" "they" / "she" / "he" ) are not generally used in conversations. In this series, the Tofugu crew discuss different ways to call others without using pronouns. In this episode, Kanae, Jenny and Rachel talk abo…
 
In this episode, Mami, Cameron, and Kanae talk about two sentence-ending particles, よ (yo) and ね (ne). They dive deep into their different nuances and uses, with a lot of examples. Also make sure not to miss a special cameo appearance of a very special holiday guest! After listening to this episode, check out our article on Tofugu.com for more info…
 
This is the second episode in our two-part さすが (sasuga) miniseries. The Tofugu crew — Kanae, Jenny and Mami — discuss the "other," overshadowed use of さすが, which is not for compliments. This discussion led to the discovery of Kanae's weird and controversial bathroom habits.After listening to the episode, check our article "さすが Is Not Always A Compl…
 
This is the first episode in our two-part miniseries about the unique Japanese word さすが (sasuga). In this episode, the Tofugu crew — Kanae, Jenny and Mami — discuss the nuances of さすが when it's used as a compliment. Listen carefully and you'll even learn about a quirky eating habit of Mami's from her high school days.…
 
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