show episodes
 
Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.
 
Ever wish you lived in a bygone era? Then get ready to have your dreams of nostalgia crushed! Join three sassy ladies as they highlight the awful parts of world history that we’ve forgotten - or tried to forget. You may be feeling down about the present, but from plagues and pox to wars and witch trials, we can assure you that everything always sucked. 'Everything Always Sucked' is a history-comedy podcast and is NSFW.
 
The Maritime History Podcast is a chronological look at maritime history and its numerous facets. Beginning with ancient history, the podcast looks at trade, exploration, boat and ship-building, economics, and the relationship between the ocean and the development of society and culture throughout history. Learn more about the podcast at http://maritimehistorypodcast.com.
 
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show series
 
When we think of the historical process, we often think of archives, books, libraries, primary sources, and journals. And we should. But sometimes there is a useful element to informal history-the interactions, relationships, memories, and stories that academics often don't bother to study. They aren't scientific, but they add color. They can fill …
 
Happy Halloween, friends! Buckle up because on this episode we explore aspects of the Satanic Panic, including the origins of Satan, recovered memories, and law enforcement. Featuring special guest, Barrett Wilbert Weed. Instagram | @everythingalwayssucked Twitter | @EASpodcast Facebook | @everythingalwayssucked…
 
When deadly and traumatic historical events transpire, there is usually plenty of attention paid to these important events. But less often studied is the scars and ripples of sadness that emanate in the lives of ordinary people after events like this. The Cultural Revolution provides a poignant example of the scars and memories that ordinary people…
 
History is the study of the past. Oftentimes we tend to forget that history still existed and is worth studying during times that wouldn't be considered earth-shattering or momentous. Could the study of "ordinary history" teach us something important about the way we look at the past? Could it teach us something about ourselves specifically or huma…
 
In this episode, I had a chance to sit down with Lan Cao and Harlan Van Cao. We discussed a number of topics, including: Lan's experience and life as a refugee of the Vietnam War and how that experience reverberates in Harlan's life, immigration and assimilation, discrimination, identity and the importance of finding equilibrium and balance in life…
 
Slavery is a difficult topic to learn and teach about. Combine this with some of the big picture problems inherent in most education systems and there is bound to be misconceptions and confusion abound. This episode tackles just a few of these myths and misconceptions through the work of a few notable historians. Support the podcast: https://www.pa…
 
A team of scientists returns home from a journey to investigate the causes of a massive supernova. What they discover in the remnants of the cloudy nebula will change humanity forever. The chief astrophysicist of the mission must wrestle with questions of science, faith, and senseless evil. Arthur C. Clarke's award winning science fiction short sto…
 
Not-so-secretly a little old lady at heart, Hadley Meares loves herself a rocking chair. But when exactly did this uniquely American invention become a feature of front porches coast to coast? Well, perhaps seat yourself in a rocking chair for this episode. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen …
 
What do we mean when we say that a civilization collapsed? This is an extremely common way to speak about ancient societies and governmental systems. It typically carries a negative connotation, but did these "collapses" actually represent decreases in the well being of the human beings who fell victim to them? A similar series of ponderings can ap…
 
Please enjoy the story of Faith, a British cat who was awarded a medal for courage during World War II. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen to Hadley’s other podcast, Underbelly L.A. It’s not quite as sunny, but it’s a fun dive into history nonetheless. Every episode of Happy History is resear…
 
Humans have not, actually, been forever blowing bubbles, but the history of mankind putting a little soapy wonder into the air goes back further than you might guess. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spotify, on Google Podcasts or on Stitcher. Listen to Hadley’s other podcast, Underbelly L.A. It’s not quite as sunny, but it’s a fun dive int…
 
Hey, remember parties? It might seem like ancient history when we could have carefree gatherings, but in this episode, we’re looking specifically at the parties held during a period of ancient history. Antony and Cleopatra might be famous for being lovers and political figures, but in their day they were also famous for throwing parties so over-the…
 
Hot on the heels of our previous episode about First Lady friendships, this episode focuses on female pilots: specifically the first two aviatrixes ever, Harriet Quimby and Mathilde Moisant. They were pioneers in the sky, and it’s all the better because they encouraged each other to greater and greater heights. Follow Hadley on Twitter. Subscribe t…
 
Personal identity and the self are major concepts of historical and philosophical study. But applying these concepts to others IS history. It's a major purpose of what we do. This episode discusses the famous thought experiment "the Ship of Theseus," and Greg Egan's excellent short story "Learning to Be Me." The lessons learned from these sources c…
 
Today, Hadley tells the story of a celebrated solider from World War I who just happens to have been a dog. Sergeant Stubby is the most celebrated of American war dogs, and this “brave stray” proved to be more than just a mascot during his eighteen months on the western front. Follow Hadley on Twitter. Subscribe to Happy History on iTunes, on Spoti…
 
If the civilizational narrative of progress as a result of human use of agriculture is flawed, then why did states and civilizations develop? How do we define a state? Were the earliest states single entities that magically appeared when enough people congregated in one area, or is it again better to think of states as one method of organization on…
 
The Greek victory at Salamis was monumental. But in the aftermath of that victory, Greece and her leaders still had many decisions to make. It is here that we begin to see a divergence between the naval-minded leaders and their vision, and the land-centered leaders with a different vision. We begin to discuss these divergent views, how they were de…
 
In what ways did early humans landscape and change the environment over time? How did early humans develop agriculture? Why was grain such a staple crop for early humans? While the standard historical narrative seems to depict the discovery of agriculture as a single watershed moment that humanity never looked back from, it might be more useful to …
 
In a special quarantine edition of the podcast, Alyson, Alyssa, and Alli cover the pandemic past of the Spanish flu, tuberculosis, the Black Death, and vampires? Yes, vampires. Author sources on the Black Death: Giovanni Boccaccio, Christian W. McMillen, Paul Slack, and Dorsey ArmstrongBy Alyson Horrocks, Alyssa Conary, Allison French
 
In some ways, common historical narratives form the backbone of our study of history. There are certain historical stories that are as old as history itself, and are thus taken for granted by the historical layman. One of the most common historical narratives is a narrative of progress: human beings lived as hunters and gatherers, until eventually …
 
As David Foster Wallace points out in his famous commencement address "This is Water," life is filled with simple realities that are difficult to talk about or even comprehend. Upon close examination, sometimes these simple and boring platitudes can have deeper meanings that change the way we look at the world. From the purpose of education, to exe…
 
The Allegory of the Cave from the ancient Greek philosopher Plato is one of the oldest and most discussed philosophical works in history. Prisoners are chained up in a cave, thinking the shadows they see on the wall in front of them represent all that reality has to offer. Plato's cave has obvious parallels to a modern world in which people seeming…
 
If you've ever dreamed of living in the wild, untamed American Old West, get ready to have all your romantic notions dashed as Alyson and Alli take on cowboy times. From the Massacre at Wounded Knee to sex in the old west, life on the range was not as ideal as writers, storytellers, and singers have often led us to believe. Join us as we discuss th…
 
Economic history is notoriously complex and difficult to gain insight from. Nazi history is notoriously complex and strangely enough it seems many ignore the lessons that should be gleaned. Combine these two realities and the result is a Nazi economic history that is controversial and potentially misleading. Some have claimed in recent years that w…
 
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