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Democracy in Question?

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Democracy in Question?

Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy

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Today, liberal democracies are under unprecedented strain from within and without. In each episode, renowned social anthropologist Shalini Randeria invites a leading scholar to explore the challenges and dilemmas facing democracies around the world. They investigate what needs to be done to ensure the future well-being of our democratic institutions and practices.
 
The Women In International Justice podcast revolves around diversity on the international bench and delves into the experiences of prominent women from the international judiciary. Together we will explore the complexity of the system as well as women’s places within it. Building on the public lecture series titled “Women’s Voices in the International Judiciary”, organized by professors Neus Torbisco Casals and Andrew Clapham, each episode will focus on the guests individual career and opini ...
 
What does research in democracy in the 21st century look like? How can we study a political system that is under constant challenge? For years, the Albert Hirschman Centre for Democracy has pioneered a collaborative approach that draws on the views of its namesake – Albert O. Hirschman – and now shares it with listeners in podcast form. Transgressing disciplinary and academic boundaries to bring new takes on forms of government, the Research at the AHCD podcast invites its researchers to med ...
 
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Guests featured in this episode: Éric Fassin, Professor of sociology and co-chair of the Gender Studies Department at Paris VIII. University, where he also established the Research Center on Gender and Sexuality Studies. His research addresses sexual and racial politics as well as immigration issues, in France, Europe, and in the United States in a…
 
Guests featured in this episode: Stephen Holmes, the Walter E. Mayer Professor of Law and co-director of the Center on Law and Security at New York University. Stephen has been the recipient of prestigious fellowships from, among others, the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study, the Wissenschaftkolleg in Berlin, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the…
 
Throughout her careers, plural,Silvia Fernández, lawyer, diplomat, and judge. And of course, former president of the ICC. Has gone through many shocks and tribulations associated with being a woman on the international bench. But these did not deter her. And in fact, push her to fight for more representation in international courts. On this episode…
 
Guests featured in this Episode Gábor Tóka, Senior Research Fellow in the Vera and Donald Blinken Open Society Archives in Budapest. A sociologist by training, he has published more than 60 articles on electoral behaviour, public opinion, political parties and democratic consolidation in edited volumes, political science and sociology journals. He …
 
Guests featured in this episode: Marzuki Darusman, an internationally recognized human rights lawyer and former Attorney General of Indonesia. Marzuki has participated in the work of UN committees on the assassination of Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan, war crimes in Sri Lanka, human rights in North Korea, and most recently, he was the chair an independ…
 
Guests featured in this episode: Slawomir Sierakowski, a Polish sociologist and political analyst, with extensive knowledge of not only Ukraine and Russia, but also the potential third party in the current war, Belarus. He is also the founder and editor-in-chief of the Krytyka Polityczna (Political Critique) magazine. His more than 400 articles and…
 
On this episode of Women in International Justice, UN special rapporteur Irene Khan reflects on her experiences as a woman in the various spheres of international justice. From the women who inspired her throughout the journey to the ways she hopes to help future generations of women Irene Khan gives us a new perspective on women's rights, intersec…
 
Guests featured in this episode Georgi Derluguian, Professor of Social Research and Public Policy at New York University’s Abu Dhabi campus. Born in the Soviet Union, Georgie then experienced its breakup as a young social scientist. Having pursued African studies in Moscow, Georgi spent two years in Mozambique during the civil war in the 1980s, and…
 
Guests featured in this episode: Renata Uitz, is the co-editor of Handbook of Illiberalism, who has contributed two chapters to it as well. Renata is also professor of Comparative Constitutional Law at the Central European University, Vienna, as well as the co-director of its Democracy Institute in Budapest. Helena Rosenblatt is a professor of hist…
 
On this second episode of our miniseries on methods Matias Lopez discusses methodology with special guest Tasha Fairfield. Together they will delve into methodological debates, bayesian statistics, and explain the many approaches in methodology. Join them as they discuss how statistical reasoning can help qualitative case studies…
 
Guests featured in this episode: Irene Khan, the first woman to ever hold the mandate of UN Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Opinion and Expression. She is also a Distinguished Fellow and Research Associate at the Graduate Institute's Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. Previously, Irene Khan was Secretary-General of Amnesty International (2001-…
 
Guests featured in this episode: Professor Andras Sajo, former judge at the European Court of Human Rights & founding Dean of Legal Studies Department at the Central European University, Democracy in Question? is brought to you by: • Central European University: CEU • The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD • The Podcast Company: N…
 
Democracy in Question? is brought to you by: • Central European University: CEU • The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD • The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media! • Central European University: @CEU • Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentre Subscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to…
 
Glossary for DiQ ep 7 series 3 – Jan Werner Müller Who was Alexis de Tocqueville? (pg. 1 tocquevillian question of the transcript or 00:1:08) French sociologist and political theorist Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) traveled to the United States in 1831 to study its prisons and returned with a wealth of broader observations that he codified in “D…
 
On the occasion of the visit of Gabriel Sterling, elections manager for the U.S. state of Georgia, to the Graduate Institute during the 2021 Geneva Democracy Week, AHCD Executive Director Christine Lutringer invites him to share his thoughts about Swiss democracy from an American perspective.By Laura bullon-cassis, Christine Lutringer, Michelle Olguin, Gabriel Sterling
 
Glossary Who is Hannah Arendt? (00: 2: 08 or page 1) Hannah Arendt (1906–1975) was one of the most influential political philosophers of the twentieth century. Born into a German-Jewish family, she was forced to leave Germany in 1933 and lived in Paris for the next eight years, working for a number of Jewish refugee organisations. In 1941 she immig…
 
The episode explores the role of locally embedded news and media organizations in facilitating citizen participation in societies seeking to further democracy. In the age of misinformation, can the patient and steady pace of radio journalism prove to be a much-needed democratic corrective? In the discussion, Caroline Vuillemine and Said Nazir exami…
 
On this episode of Research at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, Matias Lopez and Jake Bowers Political Science and Statistics and NCSA at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign discuss methodology in depth. How can methodology change research? Is there a better way to settle the debates? Or is there a way to strike a balance and ad…
 
This episode explores with Ranabir Samaddar the specific nature of democratic politics during the COVID-19 crisis. Anchored in the specificity of the experience of the pandemic in India, the episode also addresses the global transformation of politics in a time of crisis. How has the pandemic changed our understanding of politics? What does it mean…
 
This episode of the Research at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy podcast continues the conversation on civic technologies for a second part to our miniseries on civic-tech and societal change. The recent rise in civic activism and public engagement in various countries has been tied with the digital age, and social media in particular. Acti…
 
The episode explores with Avrum Burg the challenges with which the Israeli democracy is confronted. As Israel stands at the crossroads after the defeat of its longest serving Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, with his expansionist politics, which have marked the country's territorial expansion over the last decades, this episode asks: Will the new…
 
The newest episode of theResearch at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracypodcast brings a first for this project, miniseries. This particular miniseries on technologies and democracy will delve into the world of civic technologies throughout this, and future episodes. Jerôme Duberry, Lecturer and senior Researcher at the Albert Hirschman Centre…
 
Gabrielle Kaufmann-Kohler is the immediate past President and now Honorary President of ICCA, the International Council for Commercial Arbitration. She practices international commercial, investment and sports arbitration and has acted in over 220 international arbitrations, mainly as arbitrator. In this episode of Women In International Justice sh…
 
What is the nature of the linguistic and discursive repertoires of contemporary right-wing mobilizations in Europe? In this episode of Democracy in Question, presenter Shalini Randeria continues the conversation about the rise of radical right-wing political movements in recent years across the world with Ruth Wodak, Emeritus Distinguished Professo…
 
Rebecca Tapscott Ph.D. visiting lecturer at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy joins Anastasia Shesterinina Ph.D. to discuss fieldwork, fear, and empathy. Together they will reflect on their experiences and Tapscott’s new book Arbitrary States Social Control and Modern Authoritarianism in Museveni's Uganda. Find out more about the book here: …
 
The most pernicious assault on American democracy today are the laws and measures enacted in various state legislatures under Republican control that aim at voter restriction. Among the foremost voices in the struggle for democratic rights in the United States is Stacey Abrams, U.S. politician and activist. Her campaign for protecting voting rights…
 
Luca Meldolesi, Professor of Economic and Financial Policy at the University of Naples is also one of the foremost authorities on Albert Hirschman's work and legacy. On this episode of Research at the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, Professor Meldolesi reflects on Albert Hirschman's work but also on what it means for the future, what is left …
 
What does research in democracy in the 21st century look like? How can we study a political system that is under constant challenge? For years, the Albert Hirschman Centre for Democracy has pioneered a collaborative approach that draws on the views of its namesake – Albert O. Hirschman – and now shares it with listeners in podcast form. Transgressi…
 
The current rise of right wing populist leaders in democracies around the world, from Donald Trump to Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, has led to a debate on the fuzziness of these new regimes that are eroding liberalism by incorporating totalitarian features. Some argue that the term ‘fascist’ would be useful in understanding the nature of politics in th…
 
There is considerable political mobilization and legal contention around Reproductive rights in many democracies around the world. In the US, a rollback of these rights has been underway over the past decades. The Supreme Court is likely to (re)consider its landmark 1973 Roe v Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide. In contrast, activists h…
 
Power is a crucial, if essentially contested, concept. Its nature and exercise in democratic politics are not always easily grasped. Understanding who holds power, how it is used, and the relationship between those who govern and those who are governed, is critical in any political system. Professor Steven Lukes (formerly NYU) helps us figure out h…
 
On this episode of Women in International Justice, Judge Francoise Tulkens shares the memories of her first steps in the European Court of Human Rights. The doubts that plagued her colleagues, the people who inspired her and her thoughts on the future of the international Judiciary system. Inspired by the words of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Judge…
 
Digital technologies have changed and are changing our world. But the euphoria about these technologies not only improving connectivity, but creating a global public sphere have given way to caution about their impact. With the increasing monopolization of digital infrastructure and accumulation of power by a few giant Big Tech companies, there is …
 
The Diversity on the international bench podcast delves into the experiences of prominent women from the international judiciary, exploring the complexity of the system as well as women’s places within it. Building on the public lecture series titled “Women’s Voices in the International Judiciary”, organized by the Albert Hirschman centre for democ…
 
The pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong is facing its most severe crisis today. The Chinese government has been tightening its grip over the island to stifle political protest, impose restrictions on freedom of press, and hamper free and fair elections. Activists have been fighting for civil liberties and democratic rights, from the Umbrella Revolu…
 
Over the series, our focus has often been on the serious challenges that democracies face all over the world today. We have also highlighted how they can and are degenerating and morphing into authoritarianism. But this episode flips the perspective to understand how we can foster and nurture democratic spaces and practices in our societies. Profes…
 
10 years ago anti-government protests in Tunisia sparked a wave of spontaneous uprisings against authoritarian regimes in the Middle East and North Africa. The Arab Spring was met with repression by governments in the region, but ultimately led to the ousting of rulers such as Ben Ali in Tunisia, Muammar Gaddafi in Libya and Hosni Mubarak in Egypt.…
 
Most western academics were skeptical about the future of India, the world’s largest democracy, throughout the 1950s to the 1970s. It succeeded beyond all expectations in mobilizing large-scale electoral participation especially among poor and illiterate voters. And yet today its very existence seems to hang in the balance as the country faces a de…
 
The decline and even death of liberalism has been predicted often. Today it faces challenges not only from populism in Europe and the US but also from China offering an illiberal alternative that may prove attractive to leaders in the global South. In this episode, Professor Timothy Garton Ash (University of Oxford) joins us to analyze the future o…
 
Covid-19 vaccines have been developed in record time and are being distributed around the world. But issues like vaccine hesitancy, slow production and unequal access between as well as within countries are inhibiting the global vaccination progress needed to combat the pandemic. In this first episode of season 2, we’re joined by Dr. Suerie Moon (G…
 
Citizens have a crucial role to play in political life and can have tremendous power, as they come together in associations and social movements. To close this first season, Professor Mary Kaldor (London School of Economics) lends us her experience as both an academic and an activist in the peace and human rights movements to discuss what role civi…
 
Prior to the Covid 19 pandemic, the issue on everyone’s minds was climate change. Scientists have been raising the alarm for the good part of three decades, but politicians the world over have been slow to react, even as more citizens have been calling for radical action. In this episode, we're joined by Michael Ignatieff (Central European Universi…
 
Capitalism has come under attack in recent years, notably because of growing economic inequalities not only between the global North and South, but also within Western countries. Some critics even cast doubt on its legitimacy and ability to create and preserve a just and equitable society. In this episode, the economist Branko Milanovic helps us un…
 
Since the introduction of neoliberal policies under Thatcher and Reagan many countries worldwide have implemented austerity politics that dismantled social security programs by cutting public funding. Our guest today, the renowned British economist, Lord Skidelsky has argued that liberal democracy rests on a welfare state, so that austerity politic…
 
Joe Biden was declared the next president of the United States over a month ago now, but Donald Trump has not yet conceded his defeat. Claiming voter fraud, he has launched legal battles to try to undo the results of the election, to no avail. What mechanisms, institutions and narratives has he used? And to what long term effects? In this episode, …
 
A new kind of elected leader has emerged across the globe: one who rules with a large parliamentary majority and with a claim to democratic legitimacy, but who uses power to hollow out democracy from the inside. So is such ‘soft authoritarianism’ a new face of electoral democracy? Professor John Keane (University of Sydney) helps us dissect this pe…
 
We have recently seen millions of people taking to the streets to protest social, political and environmental injustices. Even a global pandemic couldn’t stop protesters across the world from showing their support to the Black Lives Matter movement. In this episode, we’re joined by Professor Nancy Fraser(The New School) and ask: can liberal democra…
 
As the results of the 2020 US election are trickling in, we are taking a look at how laws - and notably electoral laws - can be used to undermine constitutional systems from within. Our guest Professor Kim Lane Scheppele (Princeton University) helps us understand how a new kind of elected leader is using their democratic mandates to take the whole …
 
The world is more formally democratic than ever before, if measured by the number of countries that have a representative form of government. But how viable is the Western model of liberal democracy as it travels to, and is transplanted in, different countries around the world? In this episode Professor Laurence Whitehead (Oxford University) and Dr…
 
America is split into apparently irreconcilable political tribes and led by a highly divisive President who is upending democratic norms. The country is also being shaken by demonstrations against racial injustice and a severe economic downturn wrought by the mismanagement of the COVID-19 pandemic. Is American democracy having a momentary crisis or…
 
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