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Threshold is a public radio show and podcast that tackles one pressing environmental issue each season. We report the story where it's happening through a range of voices and perspectives. Our goal is to be a home for nuanced journalism about human relationships with the natural world. www.thresholdpodcast.org Season 1 | "Oh Give Me a Home" Can we ever have wild, free-roaming bison again? Season 2 | "Cold Comfort" Climate change in the Arctic through the eyes of people who live there. Season ...
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
CSIS is renowned as the leading center of Arctic research in Washington. Through research projects and analyses, it has produced countless reports and hosted senior level discussions with Canadian, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, and American officials on political, economic, and social development trends in the Arctic and their importance for the United States, Europe, and the transatlantic relationship. Its efforts have increased public debate on and awareness of Arctic issues among policymake ...
 
CSIS is renowned as the leading center of Arctic research in Washington. Through research projects and analyses, it has produced countless reports and hosted senior level discussions with Canadian, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, and American officials on political, economic, and social development trends in the Arctic and their importance for the United States, Europe, and the transatlantic relationship. Its efforts have increased public debate on and awareness of Arctic issues among policymake ...
 
Each week, Foreign Policy’s Amy Mackinnon, will recommend one podcast from around the world, interview the host, and play an excerpt. This curated show is designed to help listeners interested in the things we are—great stories, compelling interviews, and cogent analysis on international affairs—sort through the overwhelming variety of podcasts out there and find the best ones. And occasionally you’ll hear audio from our own newsroom. FP Playlist replaces our flagship podcast First Person. S ...
 
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Foreign Policy recommends: Ones and Tooze This week on FP Playlist, we feature an episode from FP Studios’ own Ones and Tooze — a new economics podcast that centers on two data points that explain aspects of the global economy. Ones and Tooze host Cameron Abadi spoke with FP Playlist about the creation of the series and what listeners can expect in…
 
Sometimes referred to as the world's oldest profession sex workers have been part of human society for as long as recorded history, but how have societies viewed them through the ages? In the episode, Dan is joined by Dr Kate Lister to find out how the treatment of sex workers has changed, whether the Victorians were really prudes, what you might f…
 
In August 2021 the Taliban swept to power in Afghanistan for the second time capturing Kabul and ousting the American backed regime, but where do they come from and what does their return to power mean for the region? To find out more about the history of the Taliban and the impact of them re-conquering Afghanistan Dan is joined by Pakistani journa…
 
The title of Caesar has echoed down the ages as the pinnacle of absolute power and perhaps even tyranny. A single man at the head of a nation or empire with untouchable power. But how powerful were they really and why are they seen as an example to follow when many of the men who became Caesar met a bloody end? Dan is joined by the legendary classi…
 
An international team of researchers has discovered that an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea in February this year was the result of re-activated Ebola virus in someone who’d been infected at least five years ago during the earlier large Ebola epidemic that swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This means the virus can remain dormant in some E…
 
Links 1. “The Thucydides Trap: Are the U.S. and China Headed for War?”, by Graham Allison, The Atlantic, September 24, 2015 2. “Tribunal Rejects Beijing’s Claims in South China Sea,” by Jane Perlez, The New York Times, July 12, 2016 3. Dr. Hye Ryeon Jang’s websiteBy Dr. Hye Ryeon Jang, Marie Williams, Walker Mills
 
During World War One the 369th Infantry Regiment of the US Army gained a fearsome reputation. One of the most effective fighting units they spent more time in the frontline and suffered more casualties than any other American regiment. Given the nickname Men of Bronze by the French and the Hell-fighters by the Germans they were feared and respected…
 
A. C. Grayling is one of the foremost minds of his generation and his new book explores some of the biggest questions that face humanity. What do we know, how do we know it and what is left to find out? In this wide-ranging conversation, he and Dan attempt to tackle some of these important questions. They discuss the incredible progress humanity ha…
 
King Henry VIII was deeply religious and started out as a staunch supporter of the Pope and the Roman Catholic church. But everything changed when Henry's need to produce a male successor led to his wanting to divorce Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn. In this first of an occasional series of Explainer podcasts, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb …
 
Ambassador Sanders (former US Ambassador to Nigeria & Congo) and General Ward (former Commander US AFRICOM) discuss US interests in the region including the opportunities (huge markets, a youth bulge, many UN Votes) and the dangers (political instability, sharply rising violence from criminal networks and extremists groups including Boko Haram). Th…
 
As the Nazi war machine rampaged across Europe it did not just take territory and resources from its conquests but also many thousands of pieces of art and other antiquities. Stolen from both galleries and individual victims of Nazi crimes allied troops discovered hidden caches of priceless artworks throughout Europe. As the war had proceeded it ha…
 
Foreign Policy recommends: B for Bacchus This week on FP Playlist, we feature an episode from B for Bacchus — a podcast about wine and culture in Lebanon and the surrounding areas. This episode explores the first Palestinian winery near Bethlehem, and pays attention to the discussion of indigenous Palestinian and Israeli grape varieties. B for Bacc…
 
15 September marks Battle of Britain Day when the Luftwaffe sought a final decisive final battle over the skies of Britain with the RAF. In a day of costly fighting, nearly 60 German aircraft were shot down and over 100 aircrew lost. From this point onwards the Luftwaffe, unable to sustain such heavy casualties, would only attack at night and it be…
 
In September 1952 Mahmood Hussein Mattan became the last to be hanged at Cardiff Prison, but Mahmood had in fact been framed by the police and 45 years later his conviction was quashed. Mahmood had been a merchant seaman who had ended up settling in Cardiff and marrying a Welsh woman called Laura Williams. They lived in the Tiger Bay district of Ca…
 
Ragnor Lothbrook is a legendary Viking figure who straddled the line between myth and reality. His adventures and deeds appear in the Viking sagas, but there is little hard evidence for his existence and according to the different sagas he dies on multiple different occasions and in a variety of grisly ways. His sons including Ivar the Boneless, Ha…
 
For the world to have a decent chance of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees, 90 per cent of remaining coal reserves and 60% of unexploited oil and gas have to stay in the ground. These are the stark findings of carbon budget research by scientists at University College London. Dan Welsby spells out the details to Roland Pease.Virologis…
 
The tragic events of 9/11 left thousands dead and injured and the impact of that loss is still being felt twenty years later by the families. It was also a day of extraordinary escapes as thousands more fled the twin towers after the planes hit. In this podcast, we both remember those people who died and also hear an extraordinary story of survival…
 
On the morning of September 11th, 2001 terrorists flew planes into both the World Trade Centre towers in New York and the Pentagon in Washington with a further plane crashing in Pennsylvania as the passengers onboard attempted to wrest control of the aircraft from the hijackers. This atrocity utterly changed the world leaving thousands dead and inj…
 
Between September 1940 and May 1941, the German Luftwaffe relentlessly pounded British cities with bombs in an attempt to force the British to surrender. Ultimately whilst killing thousands and causing extensive damage the bombing offensive failed. The morale of the British public was largely undimmed and war production was never seriously impacted…
 
In October 1919 President Woodrow Wilson suffered a massive stroke leaving him paralyzed and partially blind. In the face of this crisis of leadership the First Lady, Edith Wilson stepped in to conceal the extent of his illness. Edith acted as his gatekeeper deciding whom Woodrow Wilson saw, what material he read and even taking decisions on his be…
 
V & Cj break down the latest news and information. We discuss the creation of a new country called Prison Island and if you can't find white supremacists..do what the FBI does and simply create them. They also touch base on the Zombification of America in large cities which gives us a glimpse into America's future if we do not correct this ship.…
 
Foreign Policy recommends: Westminster Insider This week on FP Playlist, we feature an episode from Westminster Insider—Politico's weekly series on how British politics really work. This episode explores the 20-year war in Afghanistan from London's perspective. Host Jack Blanchard spoke with FP Playlist's Amy Mackinnon about the show. See acast.com…
 
In part two of their discussion, CNA counterterrorism experts Alex Powell and Jon Schroden sit down with James Cunningham the lead author for two comprehensive lessons learned reports published by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). They discuss some positive takeaways from the development of the Afghan National Se…
 
With the release of the nuclear submarine TV series, Vigil, Dr Nick Ritchie, Senior Lecturer at the University of York and the UK’s leading expert on Trident, joins James for this episode of our sibling podcast Warfare. Nick gives us a step-by-step history on the multilayered missile system, which is said to act as deterrence. Earlier this year, Bo…
 
Do the 21st Century and the Middle Ages really share that much in common? Climate change, pandemics, technological disruption, interconnected global trade and networks may all seem like modern phenomena but according to historian and author Dan Jones, they were very part of the Middles Ages as well. Examining a millennium of history Dan Jones guide…
 
Links 1. Operational Warfare at Sea: Theory and Practice, by Milan Vego, Routledge, 2020. 2. Exercising Control of the Sea: Theory and Practice, by Milan Vego, Routledge, 2020. 3. Maritime Strategy and Sea Denial: Theory and Practice, by Milan Vego, Routledge, 2020. 4. General Naval Tactics: Theory and Practice, by Milan Vego, Naval Institute Press…
 
Churchill is one of the great figures of history and this totemic figure is often cited as one of the greatest British figures of all time. However, whilst his achievement during the dark days of the Second World War is unquestionable, much of the rest of his career had much more to do with failure than success. Geoffrey Wheatcroft, journalist and …
 
When hurricane Ida struck the coast of Louisiana last weekend, almost to the day that Katrina did 16 years ago, comparisons between the two events were soon to follow. As the latest storm continues to wreak havoc and death further north in the US, Suzana Camargo of Columbia university talks to Roland Pease about the similarities and differences, th…
 
Over 55,500 men died flying with Bomber Command during World War Two; more than the number who serve in the Royal Air Force today. Flying at night over occupied Europe and battling German night fighters, anti-aircraft fire and mid-air collisions, they showed astonishing courage and resilience in the face of what often seemed to be insurmountable od…
 
On September 1 1939 Nazi Germany invaded Poland followed two days later by France and the United Kingdom declaring war on Germany and beginning the Second World War. This was the opening act in what would be the most devastating clash in human history. By its end Europe and much of Asia lay in ruins, tens of millions of people had been killed, woun…
 
Links 1. "Disrupt the Navy’s Operational Model to Counter China," by Bryan Clark & Bryan McGrath, CDRSalamander, Aug 11, 2021. 2. "Restoring American Seapower - A New Fleet Architecture for the United States Navy," by Bryan Clark, Bryan McGrath et al., Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, 2017. 3. "American Seapower at a Crossroads: A Pl…
 
How different is battlefield archaeology compared to other disciplines? Do local legends ever help track down evidence in a field? And why are potato fields in particular sometimes problematic for archaeologists? In this episode of History Hit's Gone Medieval podcast Sam Wilson, a specialist in battlefield and conflict archaeology, joins Matt Lewis…
 
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