Chris Kretz public
[search 0]
×
Best Chris Kretz podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best Chris Kretz podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
We travel this week to the Adirondacks (virtually speaking) to talk with John Warren, founder and publisher of New York Almanack. Formerly known as the New York History Blog, the Almanack delivers stories and information about all aspects of New York State history as well as the Adirondacks region. John has pursued history in many forms, including …
 
Our sojourn through the hallowed pages of the Suffolk County News from 1920 hit a speedbump this week when it turned out that no digital copy was available online. To help us sort things out, we called on Chuck Henry. Chuck is the IT Coordinator for the Northern New York Library Network (NNYLN). Part of his job is helping to keep things running at …
 
The places we live are filled with the stories of our lives, told room by room like chapters in a book. So how do you read a home? That's what Kendra Gaylord does on her podcast, Someone Lived Here. She explores historic houses to find the people who inhabited them, from poets and photographers to inventors and musicians. Today she takes us on a to…
 
We return today to the sea to consider the whale. More specifically, we talk with Brenna McCormick-Thompson of the Whaling Museum and Education Center in Cold Spring Harbor. Brenna is the Curator of Education at the museum and helps tell the story of Long Island whaling to visitors of all ages. Our discussion covers the important role Long Island p…
 
If it's Friday and we're still in self-isolation, then this is another edition of the Suffolk County News, give or take one hundred years. We're reading through the newspaper as it appeared in 1920 and pulling out the highlights, the miscellany, and the unjustly forgotten. In today's paper we find a case of suspended animation, high sugar prices, a…
 
Two museum directors, one public librarian, an artist, a researcher and a journalist. We're spending time today catching up with past guests to see how they're faring. The result is a small glimpse into the lives of six people from the region and how the coronavirus pandemic has impacted them and their jobs. Also - the return of Connie Currie! Than…
 
We continue our trek through the local news of a century gone by. Today we read the Suffolk County News from Arpil 16, 1920. We find stories of bootleggers, war-torn France and two spinster sisters freed from an insane asylum after a decade of confinement. Further Research Hal B. Fullerton Photo Exhibit (Heckscher Museum of Art) Audio Footnotes On …
 
The Freemasons have been with us since the beginning of our country. And no, they do not have secret repositories of hidden gold. They do have a long history of service, community-building and camaraderie that persists to the present. Today we welcome Ron Seifried to the podcast to explore the history and development of Freemasonry in Nassau and Su…
 
We're continuing our look at the news from 1920. Today, the Suffolk County News from Friday, April 9th. Animosity between Sayville and Patchogue on a number of levels, a case of the mumps going around, and warrior musicians returning to life during peacetime. Further Research NYS Historic Newspapers Mumps (CDC) "From Horse Power to Horsepower" by E…
 
We're using our home isolation to look back - reading issues of the Suffolk County News of 1920 week by week. For April 2, 1920: Al Smith, Fatty Arbuckle, and a cow with no tail lights. Stay tuned for more news of 1920 next week! Further Research NYS Historic Newspapers Enrico Caruso Audio footnote: Episode 60: The Soldier City of Suffolk County…
 
Today our guest, Erin Elizabeth Becker, recounts the story of her great grandmother, Marion Murdoch O’Hara, who worked for the US Radium Corporation in New York City. Through genealogical and historical research, Erin discovered a powerful and unforgettable member of her family who was tied to a dark chapter of American history. In the 1920s, many …
 
We're using our home isolation to look back - reading issues of the Suffolk County News of 1920 week by week. They had quarantines back then too, it turns out, along with corsets and a lot of poultry. Stay tuned for more news of 1920 next week! Further Research NYS Historic Newspapers NYC Mayor LaGuardia's Legendary Radio Readings (NPR) Audio footn…
 
The LaGrange Inn was a storied stopping point along Montauk Highway from the 1700s when it opened for business with a Higbie at the helm. It remained a local landmark, operating under many different proprietors, into the 21st century. Now, thanks to many dedicated people in the community (and to CVS), a part of the LaGrange survives as the West Isl…
 
History is not the full story if not everyone gets to tell it. And in places where the traditional records are scarce or silent, where do you look for answers? Today we speak with anthropologist Christopher Matthews about his work in Setauket helping the people of a traditionally Native American (the Setalcotts) and African American community uncov…
 
Warren McDowell, former publisher of The Fire Island Tide, has been pondering the mystery of how Fire Island got its name all his life. This burning question has been answered in many ways over the years. Many myths, legends and theories have been proposed but Warren wanted sources. He turned his newspaperman's eye to every old map he could find. T…
 
Mark Smith, bottle collector extraordinaire last heard on episode #63, returns to reveal his other Long Island history passion: pottery! We get an inside look at his private collection of crocks and jugs (and butter churns) documenting the evolution of pottery on the Island. We'll dive into the history of Huntington's pottery industry in particular…
 
Theresa Dodaro survived a life-threatening illness, waking from a coma determined to make the most of the time she had been gifted. One of the promises she made to herself: write. Since then, she has published four books and is working on her fifth. On this episode we discuss her journey and her process, how she combines her love of Long Island his…
 
America tried something new from 1920 to 1933: outlawing the production, sale and transportation of intoxicating liquors. In that same spirit of social experimentation, we made this episode something new. It's a joint production of the Long Island History Project and Bar Crawl Radio. Our guest is Jonathan Olly, a curator and public historian from t…
 
We take a look back at the Revolutionary War on Long Island, courtesy of the Brentwood Public Library and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. Peter Ward, the library's local history librarian, served as host. The Institute funded it; Peter Carmona, librarian trainee, recorded it. Historians Joanne Grasso of NYIT and Peter Bales of Que…
 
We were saddened by the recent news of the passing of Gene Horton, Blue Point historian, former social studies teacher, tour guide, storyteller, friend and colleague. To honor Gene’s memory and his passion for Long Island history, we’re reposting here excerpts from two interviews we conducted with him over the years. One is from 2006 and the other …
 
Elaine Kiesling Whitehouse knows a good story when she sees it, and those stories often come from history. Writing from an early age, she was intrigued by the signs of the past all around her. There was a WWI era German radio transmitting station across the street and the decaying windmill of a former Gilded Age estate down the block. On today's ep…
 
Imagine a world with a private airport around every corner and an airplane in every garage. Where your form of ID could just as easily be a pilot's license as a driver's license and your weekend is spent with people with names like "Red" and "Speed" and "Ace". That's the world Walt Winnicki grew up in, learning to fly on Long Island in the early 19…
 
David Morrison knows his railroads, from his six books on LIRR history and stations to his extensive research collection to his years overseeing thirty-nine stations. With his seventh book due out from Arcadia Press on July 15th, we could think of no better time to sit down with David and get a crash course on the history of the Long Island Rail Ro…
 
The life of an actor is never easy, so it's not surprising that many early Broadway stars made a point of vacationing in solitude on Long Island whenever they could. You might be surprised, however, at the prevailing working conditions and labor strugles they were often performing under in early 20th-cenutry theater. While the fast-growing industry…
 
Every other year, Preservation Long Island compiles a list of endangered historic places in need of saving. Sarah Kautz, their Preservation Director, joins us to discuss the four sites chosen for 2019. From a family farm in East Patchogue to a life saving station on Fire Island, each of these sites presents a unique case study in Long Island's hist…
 
Islip Town Historian George Munkenbeck provides a look at the amazing Ludlows - the first family of Oakdale, veterans of the Civil War and beyond, and caretakers of St. John's Episcopal Church on Montauk Highway. Louisa, the matriarch, descended from the first Lord of the Manor. Her husband, William Handey Ludlow, was a leading figure in the Democr…
 
Two hundred years ago, the man who broke American poetry forever was born in West Hills, Long Island. His house remains a shrine and place of pilgrimage for fans and poetry lovers from around the world. Cynthia Shor is Executive Director of the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association. She's responsible for the programming and operations and most import…
 
Erin is the Visitor Services & Volunteer Coordinator at the Long Island Maritime Museum as well as the Museum Educator at the Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum. As such she's perfectly situated to tell us about the current state of museums - and also the varied maritime histories of the North and South Shores. From whales to oysters, from field tri…
 
Clarence H. Robbins was a master of hounds and horses, a gentleman jockey and trainer, and a member of Brooklyn's Gilded Age elite. Come explore this forgotten Long Island figure with Kate Robbins, wife of Clarence's great grandson. Kate has taken on the mantle of family historian, spending years tracking down everything to do with the Robbins name…
 
More than a beach or a brand, Southampton has a history that stretches back thousands of years. The coming of English settlers in the 17th century only complicated matters. The coming of the railroad and wealthy New Yorkers in the 19th century led to a Gilded Age enclave of entrepreneurs, socialites, and celebrities. Now known world-wide as an excl…
 
We've interviewed people who have restored houses and inns and even old race cars but how do you go about restoring a lake? We conitnue our conversation with Evelyn Vollgraff (Lake Ronkonkoma Historical Society) and Danielle Campbell (News 12) to learn how to do just that. Turns out you need a dedicated commmunity, invested local businesses, and a …
 
The waters of Lake Ronkonkoma have seen it all: Native Americans, English settlers, Broadway actresses, 20th century resort-goers and automobile racers. No one knows this better than Evelyn Vollgraff, president of the Lake Ronkonkoma Historical Society. Today we dive into the history of the lake, the many myths and legends that surround this very h…
 
Dr. John Strong, professor emeritus of Southampton College, has spent a career pursuing the history of Long Island's Native Americans. His latest achievement is bringing to life the earliest days of American whaling, using what amounts to 17th century spreadsheets. He uncovers an East End in a whaling frenzy. Start-up companies (called whale design…
 
We usher in the holiday season early with this deep dive into the Charles Dickens Festival in Port Jefferson. Five of the driving forces behind the Festival, including four of the actors, tell us what it's like re-enacting the Victorian Era and what Dickens means to them. Further Research Arts Council Greater Port Jefferson Northern Brookhaven One …
 
Kerriann Flanagan Brosky investigates ghosts and other paranormal phenomenon on Long Island. She has long been fascinated with the links between local history and ghostly sightings, weaving the two together in her books. With her partner Joe Giaquinto, she has investigated and written about Long Island's old buildings and homes and the spirits who …
 
Who knew that firehouses were such deep sources of local history? In the town of Islip, they are overflowing with trophies, photos, devices, and mechanisms going back to the 1800s. There was so much history, in fact, that a dedicated group of firefighters and volunteers spent over two decades making the Islip Town Fire & EMS Museum a reality. Hear …
 
This is a feed-only episode of the Project, recorded during a podcast workshop at the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton. We did a few quick takes with the group, asking them about their memories of summer in the area. In my defense, I had been told that blueberries in Southampton were a thing. Many thanks to everyone who attended and I hope yo…
 
Matthew Monelione is back to discuss his new fantasy comic book series set in Revolutionary War-era Long Island. If you are a fan of history, JRR Tolkien, or the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, you'll want to check it out. We discuss what it takes to produce an independent comic as well as Matt's on-going research into the Loyalist experience on Long…
 
Margo Arceri grew up with history. A native of Strong's Neck in Setauket, she learned early on the stories of Anna Smith Strong and the role she played in the Culper Spy Ring during the Revolution. She got to explore the very coves and inlets that sheltered Brewster Caleb and Abraham Woodhull. And she heard it all from Anna's great great granddaugh…
 
Behind every great woman stands another great woman and Natalie Naylor is bringing them to light. Her book, Women in Long Island's Past (History Press, 2012), highlights the number of notable women who have achievevd so much on Long Island over the centuries.By Natalie Naylor, Connie Currie, Chirs Kretz, Long Island History Project
 
PJ Novak wrote the history of Huntington on a postcard. A librarian, archivist and dedicated deltiologist, she is also the author of Huntington from the Postcard History Series of Arcadia Press. On this episode she walks us through the many hamlets and villages of Huntington at the turn of the last century, pointing out the buildings, the bobsleds,…
 
The Long Island Ducks personified an era and a brand of hockey. From 1959 to 1973, they fought, checked, and slashed their way through the Eastern Hockey League and the Long Island Arena in Commack. If this sounds vaguely familiar, think back to the 1977 film Slap Shot with Paul Newman. Newman's character, Reg Dunlop, was based on the Duck's defens…
 
We've been tracking the history of the Culper Spy Ring for a while on the Project but today we go to the source - two primary sources to be exact. Kristen Nyitray, Director of Special Collections and University Archives at Stony Brook, and Chris Filstrup, former Dean of SBU Libraries, discuss their pursuit and acquisition of two letters by George W…
 
Gil Bergen was the long-time superintendent of the Connetquot River State Park Preserve in Oakdale. His association with the park goes back to 1945 when he started working at what was then the storied South Side Sportsmen's Club. This intervew, recorded in 2007 at the Park, includes Sallie Kachell and Rhoda McManus of Oakdale. You'll hear Gil descr…
 
Mary Lou Cohalan and friends bought the Suffolk County News in the late 1960s. Hear about the trials and tribulations of running a hometown paper on Long Island, from the every day of school votes and local government to the extraordinary catastrophes that drop out of the sky. Further Research The Suffolk County News Sayville Cabinet for the Sick…
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login