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What do bagels and sexual harassment have in common? The food industry! Serena Dai (@ssdai), a senior features editor at the San Francisco Chronicle, has made her name by thinking and writing about all things food - emphasis on ALL THINGS - from the hilarious/inconsequential to the direly serious issues of sexual misconduct and racism. A local jour…
 
Deep in the jungle, Fabiano Maisonnave finds amazing stories to tell. He is the only correspondent for a major Brazilian newspaper to be based in the Amazon rainforest region. Long before he reported on remote Amazon tribes, Fabiano tells us about leaving his first assignment in farm country over death threats. He then sets off on a long period as …
 
Prague, come for the theater, stay for the podcasting. Morgan Childs, co-host and producer of the Foreign Insiders podcast, tells us about getting her start reporting stories on food and “weird” Eastern Europe. She has now found a new professional life as an audio journalist, launching her podcast series on migration in the Czech Republic. Countrie…
 
Jane Arraf (@janearraf) didn’t go seeking war, war came to her. She first moved to Iraq in 1997 under Saddam Hussein and was kicked out twice before returning when the U.S. invaded. She also bore witness to the carnage in Mosul in the wake of ISIS. Her reporting on conflict stands out for its humanity, vibrancy and - when possible - hope. She is no…
 
Remember traveling? While you’re stuck inside in the pandemic, you can still travel far and wide thanks to the Far from Home podcast by public radio veteran Scott Gurian. Scott takes you along for the ride on one of the world’s epic road trips from London to Mongolia and back across the deserts of Iran and mountains of central Asia. The Peabody awa…
 
We go deep on a history of Central American violence with Sarah Esther Maslin (@sarahmaslin). She discusses the years she’s spent reporting out a prospective book about Latin America’s largest modern massacre in El Salvador, stemming from her lifelong fascination with violent tragedies and the marks they leave on society. That project led her to fr…
 
It turns out there’s a lot more to Russia than just Putin and election meddling. Sure, we talk about that, but independent radio producer Charles Maynes in Moscow tells us tales of Russian culture from the early Soviet era to present. While he may not always think of himself as a journalist, that may be what makes his journalism work so great. Also…
 
We prowl the halls of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team in the capable hands of Tim Cato (@tim_cato), a staff writer with The Athletic. Tim got into sports reporting as a 17-year-old fan, but now he’s seen too much and the fandom has melted away. Still, he loves his job reporting on the huge characters, power dynamics and colorful feature storie…
 
Ode to a Grecian journ(alist). Family looms large in this episode with Joanna Kakissis (@joannakakissis), a correspondent in Athens for National Public Radio, whose Greek parents instilled in her the importance of their culture from a young age. She made a mark early in her career as part of a Pulitzer finalist newspaper reporting team before retur…
 
As a journalist, who you are matters. Freelance journalist Fariba Nawa (@faribanawa) tells how she learned this the hard way. But her identity, that early in her career may have hindered her, has turned into a strength. She has gone from refugee to a reporter who covers refugees. She is an Afghan American proud of her heritage who also struggles wi…
 
A very special election episode! Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson) talks to us about how she is approaching U.S. presidential election coverage as Senior Deputy Policy Editor at Vox. As you may well have guessed, covering this election has turned out to be very different than we could have predicted. Libby also talks about how she came to work for journ…
 
What’s this? There’s more? We talk in-depth about his job helping shape the visual language of The New York Times and his approach to video journalism, as well as an offbeat story set in North Korea that never quite happened. Countries featured: North Korea, USA Jonah's short doc about zoonotic diseases - https://nyti.ms/2F0fOkS Follow us on Twitte…
 
Gen X photo bum finds journalism, makes good. Well, ok, there’s about 15 more steps in the middle that leaves out. And like 60+ countries. Jonah Kessel (@jonah_kessel) is proof that the right camera can change someone’s life. Now at The New York Times, he is constantly trying to push the limits of what video and visuals can do, even when those limi…
 
A love story between Cuban spies. Jungle warfare in Central America. A military coup in Chile. A roller coaster relationship with Fidel Castro. Lucia Newman, Latin America Editor and a Senior Correspondent in Chile for Al Jazeera English, has seen and reported on it all over several decades covering the region, dodging more than a few bullets along…
 
What do you do when there's a pandemic on, but you are a video journalist with no choice but to go out to capture the images you need? Atish Patel (@atishpatel, Insta: atishp) a videographer for Agence France-Presse discusses the calculations he makes when deciding whether to go out. He also talks about how being fired helped him to change his pers…
 
What insanity inspires 20,000 normal people to run 56 miles (90 kilometers) every year in South Africa? Ryan Lenora Brown (@ryanlenorabrown) tells us how Apartheid helped make this race a phenomenon. She talks about trying to tell stories that don’t revert to stereotypes of Africa, even as we ponder the ethics of white foreigners reporting on South…
 
Bopha Phorn (@bophaphorn) tells of hunting down a Russian pedophile and fearing for her life as she reported on deforestation in Cambodia. The International Women’s Media Foundation has honored her brave reporting with its Courage in Journalism Award. Bopha now reports for Voice of America’s Khmer language edition, a rare source of unrestricted new…
 
The Feel Good Episode of the Year! Bangladeshi photographer Ismail Ferdous (IG: ismailferdous) went from borrowing money to pay for a camera to his first paid project being published in the New Yorker. He lays out his philosophy of seeking the work that speaks to him and working on personal projects without thinking of where it will be published. N…
 
From covering covert arms deals under Chilean dictator Pinochet to seven-hour speeches by Fidel Castro, Anthony Boadle (@AnthonyBoadle) has written the first draft of Latin America’s history over recent decades. Not without risk - he’s been kicked out of a country (but allowed back), had his apartment broken into (likely by state security) and is f…
 
Roving the African continent to report the bloodiest conflicts is a far cry from being a polished news anchor, sitting behind a desk. Tomi Oladipo (@Tomi_Oladipo) has shown incredible range in his career working for the BBC for 12 years in Africa before becoming a news presenter for German broadcaster DW News in Berlin. Tomi discusses the toll of c…
 
Sometimes you have to get fired again and again (and again) to figure out your place in the world. Ed Clowes’ (@edclowes) story is not your common journalistic tale. Kids, don’t try this one at home. He gets fired for increasingly noble reasons though, ultimately getting kicked out of the city-state of Dubai. Be warned, despite the title of this ep…
 
After public health got too depressing and following gorillas through the jungle proved monotonous, Laurel Chor (@laurelchor) turned to journalism. She quickly made a name for herself covering at civil unrest in Hong Kong, also doing a couple years' stretch working for the Vice News Tonight television show on HBO. She discusses her circuitous path …
 
How do you cover violence in a thoughtful way? Megan Crepeau (@crepeau) had plenty of time to chew that question over working the overnight beat at The Chicago Tribune, trawling the city with police scanners and looking for news. Now she brings that perspective to covering Chicago’s main criminal court, one of the busiest in the United States. Mega…
 
Aarti Betigeri (@pomegranitaa) takes us from Australia to India and back again, touching on some new publications like Monocle magazine and geographies like Sri Lanka along the way. She also keeps it real about the struggles of working in a media landscape dominated by Murdoch and seeking more rights for Australian freelance journalists. We also ta…
 
The world of Chinese high finance is actually way more stupid and ridiculous than you probably realize. Seriously, sometimes millions or billions of dollars change hands for relatively stupid reasons like, delivery coffee + China, what’s the worst that could go wrong? Pete Sweeney (@petesweeneypro), an opinion columnist for Reuters Breakingviews, g…
 
Megha Rajagopalan (@meghara) brings top-notch investigative journalism to Buzzfeed - yes, the site that rose to prominence based on listicles. She installed Buzzfeed’s first bureau in Beijing, only to be kicked out of the country after revealing the depths of China’s police state. Reporting on surveillance and human rights has been the hallmark of …
 
"If you think it’s just fun, you’ve never interviewed Mick Jagger because that motherfucker will rip you into shreds." Freelance journalist Paul Schrodt (@paulschrodt) takes the podcast to a very different place, telling us what it’s like to report on the business of entertainment. He also got into digital journalism at a time when it was still the…
 
Terrence Edwards (@TerryReports) has gone deep on Mongolia. Moving there with the Peace Corps, he’s been in the country for more than a decade, braving 30 below temperatures in a yurt (ger) and runaway horses. He is Bloomberg’s point man for coordinating with Bloomberg TV Mongolia, a local affiliate in Mongolian languages, and does work for Bloombe…
 
Stuart Lau (@stuartlauscmp) weaves his personal narrative together with the story of Hong Kong seamlessly. He touches on his beginnings in journalism that coincided with the first protests there since Tiananmen, pursuing a key official in the HK handover from the UK to China decades later, his inability as a Hong Konger to become a diplomat (much t…
 
Which path to take, editor or reporter? It’s a choice many journalists have to make at some point. Quartz India Editor Diksha Madhok (@dikshamadhok) tells us how she went from exercising influence through individual stories on issues like women in Indian society to shaping whole newsrooms and publications. We discuss growing up in India and not bec…
 
A 20+ year career as a foreign correspondent in Japan, Brazil and China has given Jonathan time to reflect on the great responsibility and privilege of the job, but also the preposterousness of being tasked with summing up another country. Speaking to us while on sabbatical in the Amazon rainforest, Jonathan tells how he came to realize that the en…
 
Should correspondents abroad for international publications like Associated Press, Reuters, NYT, etc be foreigners or locals? Lynsey Chutel (@lynseychutel), a South African journalist who has been a staff reporter for Associated Press and startup website Quartz, can see both sides of the argument. But she also shares her frustration at a two-tiered…
 
Ever wonder about the right formula for being an international freelancer? Kit Gillet (@kitgillet), a freelancer for The New York Times, The Guardian, The Economist and any number of magazines and newspapers, seems to have figured it out. He has reported from more countries than just about any other journalist I know, freelancing for the last eight…
 
Man this is an American episode. There is cocaine, the military, refugees, the decline of the American newsroom, a one-room school house, steel mills, the list goes on. Lots of laughs too. I talked to Janet Morgan, editor of the Myrtle Beach Herald, a weekly newspaper in South Carolina. Janet has won copious awards for her photography and likes to …
 
Capturing the perfect moment is essential for visual journalists. For two stories by Hélène Franchineau (instagram: @helene_fr), the critical images were moments of reunion. First, she tells the odyssey of Chinese migrant workers going home for Chinese New Year, the only chance to see their children and family each year. And then the story of a Uyg…
 
You've been reporting on Brazil for about six years and an old source gets in touch. The preacher tells you how bad things have gotten since the last time you saw him years back, when things were already stalling out for what was once billed as an oil boom town. A militia had taken over their small town, and people are disappearing. What do you do?…
 
What was it like reporting on the Christchurch mosque attack? Charlotte Greenfield tells us how it felt to be there as someone from New Zealand and takes us inside her story examining how such an attack could happen. We also talk about her story from when she did a stint in Afghanistan on how US peace talks with the Taliban could be marginalizing A…
 
The Taliban has interns. David Stout a correspondent in Pakistan for Agence France Presse (AFP) looked into the communications apparatus of the Islamic fundamentalist group, only to find it operates much like any media organization, unpaid interns and all. We also discuss how after growing up in small town New Mexico, Dave pingponged around Asia be…
 
Brian Rosenthal (@brianmrosenthal) is proof that outstanding local journalism can get you places. *THE* place in fact - The New York Times. Brian walks us through the story that got him there, a bombshell of a report on how the state of Texas systematically denied special education to 250,000 children. That story was a finalist for the Pulitzer Pri…
 
Strap in for a hero's journey through the world of Indonesian terrorism. Charlie Campbell (@charliecamp6ell) of Time magazine walks us through the series of strange turns that took him to that took him to a prison, the Ivy League for Jihadists before landing an interview with the first female suicide bomber (she was not successful and therefor aliv…
 
Have you ever wondered what it's like for a journalist to work with sensitive sources who could get fired or go to jail? We get right into that with our guest Koh Gui Qing (@GQReuters) of Reuters in New York. After Singapore, Australia and China, her latest turn as an investigative reporter in New York was set in motion by an unexpected tip off and…
 
Is being a news producer on Netflix’s Patriot Act with Hasan Minahj technically journalism? Who cares, it’s pretty f***ing cool. Our guest Meredith Clark (@MeredithLClark) hails from the same hometown as our host and guides us from McFarland, Wisconsin through her lengthy list of credits as a journalist taking us to some parts of the industry we ha…
 
Let’s talk about goons baby, let’s talk about goons and me. Let’s talk about all the good things and the bad things goons could be. Our guest this episode is Joseph Campbell (@detectivejoe88), a journalist for Reuters Video News in Beijing. Lugging around his camera to report the biggest news of the day, Joe has become an expert on the goons who se…
 
Hermit state North Korea has to stay afloat somehow. As Financial Times reporter Don Weinland (@donweinland) found out, that means managing ships through Hong Kong. In this interview, we navigate the twists and turns that got Don from the deserts of Nevada to digging through shipping records for the UK’s premier financial newspaper. Unlike my first…
 
Camilla Costa (@_camillacosta) is kind of a big deal. As a reporter for the BBC in Brazil, she broke the story of the Zika virus outbreak wide open. She's now just started as an data journalist for the BBC at the mothership in London, but has an extremely varied career before that. She's worked for Brazil's premier magazine and the top newspaper an…
 
Paul Carsten (@paulcarsten) covers Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, for Reuters news agency from the capital city of Abuja. Hailing from the north of England, we talk about how he got to Oxford, Beijing and ultimately Abuja. Paul talks about a piece he did in the run-up to the Nigerian election on a grisly Islamic State massacre of dozens o…
 
Nomaan Merchant (@NomaanMerchant) covers immigration for the Associated Press in Houston, Texas. We discuss how he visited the Chicago Tribune in middle school, our shared experience as student journalists and how he ended up working for AP for a stint in China. He also walks us through his reporting a piece showing the human impact of an ICE immig…
 
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