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Boule de Suif (1880) is a short story by the late-19th century French writer Guy de Maupassant. It is arguably his most famous short story, and is the title story for his collection on the Franco-Prussian War, entitled "Boule de Suif et Autres Contes de la Guerre" ("Boule de Suif and Other Stories of the War"). John Ford said that his film Stagecoach was in many ways a western rewrite of Boule de Suif. (Summary by Wikipedia)
 
The first significant published short story of French author Guy de Maupassant, and generally acknowledged as his greatest work, "Ball-of-Fat" (French title: Boule de Suif) is the touching story of an interrupted coach ride from Rouen to Le Havre during which occurs the corruption of a principled prostitute by immoral and hypocritical members of the upper class. The story is set during the occupation of Rouen at the time of the Franco-Prussian War. (Summary by Michael Thomas Robinson)
 
Enjoy a new, curated short story every episode. We hand-pick 15-25 minute short stories from a pool of award-winning fiction writers. Then we turn them into to mini audiobooks that improve any commute, workout, or walk in the park. Read by professional narrators. Every day is a different story. One morning we might bring you a sci-fi thriller by the legendary Ray Bradbury, and the next morning might be a Sherlock Holmes detective story by Arthur Conan Doyle. Romance? We’ve got it. Narrative ...
 
"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordswor ...
 
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This special episode of Troubadour Talks features three members of the Literary Canon Club—a group dedicated to reading through the entire Western Canon from Homer to Rand. Book one in our group was The Iliad. In this episode, Kirk discusses various aspects of Homer’s The Iliad with Molly Johnson, Marco Romero and Heather Schwarz. Even if you have …
 
On today’s episode of Troubadour Talks, I chat with a host of the Daily Objective, Nikos Sotirakopoulos, about the novel by Jack Schaefer “Shane.” One critic of Shane has expressed, correctly, that if you are to read one Western novel, let it be Shane. Nikos and I discuss the straightforward plot and then have a deep discussion of the characters an…
 
Today's guest is Rucka, and we will be discussing Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie and The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Anderson. We had a great discussion of the meaning of Peter Pan and why this is such a valuable story for children and adults. What is the meaning of a boy who never grows up? What role does passion play in our lives, and do we have t…
 
Today we have some Shakespeare to discuss. I have as my guest Ann Ciccolella, artistic director of Austin Shakespeare. We will be exploring the play "Macbeth", Also known within the theatre community as "The Scottish Play." Before digging into the play, Ann and I explain why it can be beneficial to read the play and even watch videos summing up the…
 
Film director & producer Chris DePretis joins Kirk to talk about the short story “Boule de Suif” by Guy de Maupassant. It is said that Maupassant is the most adapted literary writer after Shakespeare. Though this is hard to prove, because often his short stories offer a broad brush by which film directors like John Ford will use to paint. Neverthel…
 
Kirk and guest Luc Travers from http://www.literatureatourhouse.com/​ discuss the dystopian novel by Ray Bradbury “Fahrenheit 451.” Together they give a synopsis (from memory) of the story. Then they leap into the flames of Bradbury’s tale. In this episode, you’ll enjoy discussions on: The main characters: Guy Montag, Chief Beatty, Clarise and Fabe…
 
Eric and I go over a synopsis of this play, first staged in 1897 to immense adulation. Then we discuss the meaning of the love triangle, the larger-than-life character of Cyrano and the meaning of the play. Since 1897 there has been a variety of different projections of Cyrano’s looks. This is an important feature of the play. How ugly should Cyran…
 
My guest today is Jesse McCarthy Founder of MontessoriEducation.com Jesse McCarthy began his career as a young assistant at a small private school in California, and now 15+ years later he leads an organization that helps parents and teachers around the world to achieve inevitable success with children — happily and without stress. We discussed The…
 
What do Holden Caufield, Jerry Fletcher (Conspiracy Theory, 1997, played by Mel Gibson) and a modern conspiracy theorist have in common? On this episode of Troubadour Podcast, I discuss the style of J.D. Salinger's story about Holden Caufield's weekend adventure. This is a book that has been linked to multiple assassins, including the man who shot …
 
On this episode of Troubadour Talks I had as a guest Timothy Sandefur, VP of Litigation at Goldwater Institute. We discussed the play Oedipus the King by Sophocles. The Oedipus is likely one of the most referenced and analyzed work of imaginative literature in the history of the world. Now, Tim and Kirk have added their voices to this endeavor! Bot…
 
Welcome to Troubadour Talks, a new show where a guest and I discuss a great work of classic literature. On today's episode I spoke with Jon Hersey of the Objective Standard Institute about Ayn Rand's fist novel, We The Living. Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist. Her dates are 1905-1982. She is most known for her later novels The Fountainhead …
 
GRUESOM ALERT Some portions of this episode may be unsuitable for young children. In this story the ghost of a murder victim appears at the trial of the murderer, making the jury, the judge and attorneys act strange. Also a short fiction story about bloody faces. About 37 minutes. Read by Robert Crandall All rights reserved. Please share with a fri…
 
in this episode I give five reasons you should consider reading Moll Flanders, an early 18th century novel written by Daniel Defoe, who is the author of Robinson Crusoe. The five reasons are: 1) You get to visit 17th century London -I mention a painting, which is featured as the artwork for this episode. It is "The Egg Dance by Jan Steen." 2) Meet …
 
Visit my magazine's website for a full analysis and commentary: https://www.troubadourmag.com/post/william-wordsworth-steals-a-boat-an-excerpt-from-the-prelude The Boat Stealing Scene from the 1850 Prelude by William Wordsworth: One summer evening (led by her) I found A little boat tied to a willow tree Within a rocky cove, its usual home. Straight…
 
This is a poem in Blake's "Songs of Innocence & Experience: Showing The Two Contrary States of the Human Soul." This poem is ripe with Biblical images. In fact, I'd argue that the entire poem is an extended metaphor, not to be taken literally at all. Though, there is a narrative story in the poem, the action of this story must be taken metaphorical…
 
O. Henry is a romantic writer, not because he writes epic tales of our medieval past, or that his stories always are love stories (though this one is!) but rather, because of his unique usage of language. He never wanted to accept that the ordinary had to be ordinary. He wanted it to be extraordinary, exotic, exciting, filled with wonder and imagin…
 
The primary narrative of this novella ends with this chapter. Next is a series of deposition documents describing the inquiry into the slave revolt. In the summary I condense the key events of this chapter. In the closer look, I discuss three key points that are helpful in understanding this piece by Melville. 1) The core epistemological quandary I…
 
This chapter concludes the major part of Melville's narrative. We left off at the end of chapter 2 with the shaving scene. Delano has left Cereno to confer with his slave Babo. Delano is surprised t see Babo running after him with a cut on his face. He has been cut by his master Benito Cereno, in retaliation for Babo having accidentally cut him dur…
 
Here I give a quick summary of chapter 2: The Gordian Knot. Then we dive into the mind of Captain Amasa Delano. One of the key values of reading great literature is the ability to enter the consciousness of another person. This is something we are unable to do in our daily lives. In Captain Delano you may find an unnerving similarity to the way tha…
 
This is my reading of chapter 2 of "Benito Cereno" by Herman Melville. Please note that this is part 4 of the series on this novella. In part One I have created an introduction for the text. In Part Two I have read Chapter 1: A Ship in Distress. In Part Three I have created a summary of Chapter 1 and a Closer Look into that chapter. This is part Fo…
 
In this episode we go over the first "Chapter" which I have titled "A Ship in Distress." Make sure you have listened to parts 1 & 2. Part 1 is my introduction to Melville's Novella. Part 2 is my reading of Chapter 1. And this part, 3, is my quick summary followed by a closer look into the chapter. I broke the Closer Look into 4 categories: 1) The O…
 
This is the first reading of the novella by Herman Melville. In part 1 I argued why this remains a classic story we should all read. It may help to listen to my introduction. Visit troubadourmag.com for a list of important terms, including nautical terms, that may help you to better understand the text. In the next episode I will give you a summary…
 
In part one of this series I argue why it is of critical importance for all Americans to read this novella by Herman Melville before it is too late. In it are critical observations about the American spirit, and an underlying philosophy that is currently tearing us apart. Melville's story, published in 1855, is a thriller/mystery based on a true st…
 
On this episode I talk with Troubadour Magazine's new Assistant Editor, Joe Dimon, about the three short stories we selected for his upcoming course on Science Fiction Literature. The three stories are Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Rappaccini's Daughter" Kurt Vonnegut's "Harrison Bergeron," David Griggs's "A Song Before Sunset." In this episode we discuss…
 
Our feature story was written in 1921 and published in Weird Tales magazine in April 1926. In this story a human like creature has been living in a dark castle his whole life and seeks light and other humans like he has read about. His perilous escape from the castle, frees him into the real world he has never seen before and the results are horrif…
 
Kelsy Landin is a sculptor who has recently found an unexpected niche: The Nose. On the social media platform TikTok her videos have been reaching millions of young people. She had been making 60 second videos teaching different aspects of sculpting, when suddenly, one video she posted reached 4.5 million views and almost 17,000 comments. What happ…
 
The story on this episode is scary in that a man discovers a way to make guns fire remotely and goes on a terror destroying anything containing gun powder. Murders people with their own guns. Seeking revenge for a life of misery he blows up Ships and Forts and much more. Could this happen with todays technology ? About 45 minutes. Originally publis…
 
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