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Best History Podcasts We Could Find
Best History Podcasts We Could Find
History is an interesting field. But with those thick history books and long articles one needs to deal with, it can sometimes be a challenge to love history. Good thing there are podcasts to save you from this drama! Podcasts are a very convenient way for both learning and entertainment. With just your PC or phone, you can stream podcasts wherever there's internet connection. Most importantly, if you download podcasts, you can enjoy them even when offline. It may come as a surprise to you, but there are actually a lot of history podcasts out there. Whether it's ancient history, world history or military history, there's a podcast dedicated to each of that. There are even podcasts about the history of certain places like China, Rome and England, or monumental events like revolutions, civil wars and World War II. For an easy start, we've listed the best history podcasts here for you. Play them now, and enjoy having a blast from the past!
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Revisionist History is Malcolm Gladwell's journey through the overlooked and the misunderstood. Every episode re-examines something from the past—an event, a person, an idea, even a song—and asks whether we got it right the first time. From Pushkin Industries. Because sometimes the past deserves a second chance. iHeartMedia is the exclusive podcast partner of Pushkin Industries.
 
A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes.
 
Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood. New episodes every two weeks, on Tuesdays.
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we’ll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind Tides Of History, Fall Of Rome and ...
 
In 2003, the United States invaded Iraq without provocation. Most Americans supported the war—as did most politicians and intellectuals, both liberal and conservative. Today, it’s universally considered a disaster.Hosted by award-winning reporter Noreen Malone, the fifth season of Slow Burn explores the people and ideas that propelled the country into the Iraq War, and the institutions that failed to stop it. How did the Iraq catastrophe happen? And what was it like to watch America make one ...
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
Our lives can be crazy, but you can take a break from it all with Wondery’s new series, Even the Rich, where co-hosts Brooke Siffrinn and Aricia Skidmore-Williams pull back the curtain and chat about someone else’s craziness for a change. They tell stories about some of the greatest family dynasties in history, from the Murdochs to the Royals to the Carters (Jay-Z and Beyoncé, that is). Because as Queen Elizabeth once said, “A good gossip is a wonderful tonic.”
 
The Last Archive​ is a show about the history of truth, and the historical context for our current fake news, post-truth moment. It’s a show about how we know what we know, and why it seems, these days, as if we don’t know anything at all anymore. The show is driven by host Jill Lepore’s work as a historian, uncovering the secrets of the past the way a detective might. iHeartMedia is the exclusive podcast partner of Pushkin Industries.
 
Discover ancient Egypt, in their own words. This podcast uses ancient texts and archaeology to uncover the lost world of the Nile Valley. A tale of pharaohs, pyramids, gods, and people. The show is written by a trained Egyptologist and uses detailed, up-to-date research. We dive deep into the ancient society, to uncover their fascinating tales. A member of the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Journey into the underworld of American organized crime and the stories behind the rise and fall of the most notorious mobsters in history. From Charles “Lucky” Luciano and John Gotti, to Donnie Brasco, “Bugsy” Siegel and Dutch Schultz–Mafia explores the lives of our greatest gangsters and the cops and attorneys who worked to bring them down.
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
HTDS is a bi-weekly podcast, delivering a legit, seriously researched, hard-hitting survey of American history through entertaining stories. To keep up with History That Doesn’t Suck news, check us out on Facebook and Instagram: @Historythatdoesntsuck; on Twitter: @HTDSpod; or online at htdspodcast.com. Support the podcast at patreon.com/historythatdoesntsuck.
 
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show series
 
On August 4, 1914, Britain declared war on Germany and entered the First World War. This was a conflict of unparalleled savagery with industrialized slaughter on a scale that the world had never seen before. To commemorate this important anniversary Dan guides us through what led Europe and the world to choose war in 1914. He explores some of the m…
 
Enterprise, Alabama is home to a fascinating statue honoring the boll weevil, a tiny creature that once wreaked havoc across cotton country. So what inspired the good people of Enterprise to erect a statue honoring the insect that almost destroyed their town? Learn more in today's episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodca…
 
Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, and Marguerite Kaye join us to discuss their new historical romance novel, Her Heart for a Compass, which follows Victorian aristocrat Lady Margaret Montagu Scott, as she seeks to shake off the suffocating restrictions of the time. (Ad) Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York and Marguerite Kaye are the co-authors of Her He…
 
The King's mummy, daily routine, and children. Thanks to the preservation of his burial, we know a lot about Tut'ankhamun's daily life and habits. Aspects of his routine, like his shaving kit, walking sticks, and even his children survive to this day. Some of these stories are curious, others carry echoes of tragedy and loss. Support the Show at ww…
 
The 1970s were a time of rapid development in the Indian Himalayas. New roads had recently been built, allowing logging companies greater access to the region’s vast, remote forests. Local people made a subsistence livelihood from these woods, and when the trees were cut down they endured erosion, poor farming conditions and catastrophic floods. A …
 
Dan discusses his background in miniature wargaming and then talks to one of the architects of a popular Second World War themed video game about the genre, its development, growth and challenges. 1. War Games through the Ages 3,000BC to 1,500AD by Donald F. Featherstone 2. How to Play War Games in Miniature: A Forgotten Wargaming Pioneer Early War…
 
Hello everyone, I don’t normally talk about personal things on the podcast. But my father has been diagnosed with cancer. It’s serious and it’s all happened very quickly. I am still working away on the next Byzantine Story but further disruption to the schedule is inevitable. Thanks for your understanding. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-…
 
Annie Jump Cannon has been described as doing for stars what Carl Linnaeus did for organisms. She compiled a massive star catalogue, and became known both as the most famous woman astronomer of her lifetime, and as the “census-taker of the sky.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
This week, we're presenting something fun from Malcolm Gladwell, co-founder of Pushkin. In a special series from his podcast, Revisionist History, Malcolm is launching a massive frontal assault on The Little Mermaid. You might wonder, "what's Malcolm doing? It's a children's classic!" But according to Malcolm, it's not a classic... It's a cinematic…
 
An epilogue. Or interlude? Well, we aren’t done with the Gilded age, but we have too much behind-the-scenes HTDS evolution to discuss! So here we are. Zach is moving up from intern to writer status. Longtime HTDS team member Kelsi gets behind the mic for the first time. Meanwhile, Greg discusses doing a second edition of older episodes. But of cour…
 
In this episode of Half-Arsed History, discover the history of the bicycle, and how it went from being a wooden-wheeled, bone-shaking daredevil’s plaything to a wonderful machine that influenced historical political movements and changed the way we travel. https://halfarsedhistory.files.wordpress.com/2021/08/162-the-history-of-the-bicycle.mp3 Downl…
 
Alexander the Great is one of the most famous generals and empire builders in history, but the story of his death is almost as remarkable as his life. For this episode, our host and Alexander the Great superfan, Tristan Hughes, joins Dan Snow to tell the almost unbelievable tale of what happened after Alexander died. The ensuing titanic struggle fo…
 
As TF 16 under Admirals Halsey and Mitscher sail closer to the Japanese Home Islands, the Allies’ naval forces loose several vessels. It’s no longer a question of will Doolittle’s Raiders succeed, but rather, will the carrier Enterprise and Hornet make it safely back to Pearl Harbor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoi…
 
Having laid waste to the once glorious city of Baghdad, Hulegu Ilkhan now sets his sights east of the Euphrates, to the fertile lands of Syria and Egypt beyond. But what's to follow will set of a momentous clash in Galilee, at a spring called Ain Jalut, that will shake the very fundaments of history...Time Period Covered:1258-1260 CEMajor Historica…
 
In the 1530s, Henry VIII declared himself to be the ‘Supreme Head’ of the Church of England, and he demanded absolute loyalty from his subjects. Those who crossed him risked the loss of their heads. Meanwhile, the modern punctuation system started to emerge with the introduction of the comma and other punctuation marks. In this episode, we look at …
 
We're often told that ancient Mesopotamia was the "Cradle of Civilization," but what made the region stand out in comparison to its neighbors and contemporaries? More than anything else, it was living in cities and working in a hyper-specialized economic role as subjects of kings that defined life in Mesopotamia. Patrick's book is now available! Ge…
 
In 1904, St. Louis was thrust into the national spotlight, as it played host to both the World’s Fair and America’s first Olympic Games. After a bitter fight over which American city would host, Olympic founder Pierre De Coubertin had disavowed the St. Louis games entirely, passing the torch to amateur sports magnate James Sullivan. But Sullivan br…
 
This is the first of a multi part exploration of protest music in America during the late 1960s, beginning with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young's Ohio, written to mourn the killing of four students by the National Guard at Kent State University in Ohio, in May 1970. By the late 1960s, the pressure of the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights movement had…
 
Hi everyone, I'm taking a small summer break for a couple of weeks, so to cover the gap I have a few older patreon bonus episodes to put out for the main feed and give everyone a chance to hear them. Here is an interview I did with Professor Derek Abbott on the recent news about the Exhumation efforts in the Somerton Man case. Professor Derek Abbot…
 
Some of the best songs you've ever heard were written by Dallas Frazier. Don't recognize the name? Don't worry. You'll remember it forever after this episode, especially those of you who love Charley Pride, Elvis Presley, Merle Haggard, Connie Smith, Charlie Rich, George Jones, The Oak Ridge Boys, Emmylou Harris, Gene Watson, Tanya Tucker, Bobby Ba…
 
Laszlo picks up in 1818 with the Napoleonic Wars finished and the Dutch returning to their colonies to put everything back the way it was when they left. The struggle between the Dutch and the Chinese kongsis of West Borneo discussed previously continues with a fight to the finish in Part 2. The legacy of this century of history that occurred in Ka…
 
We hear about the start of the war in Darfur, through the eyes of a teenage boy whose life was changed when the Sudanese military allied to a local militia, the Janjaweed, laid waste to villages across the region, killing and raping as they went. We hear from a survivor of Norway's worst day of terror, when a far-right extremist, Anders Breivik, la…
 
We continue our series on the Inquisition with the campaigns to suppress the Waldensians. These "Poor Men (and Women!) of Lyon" were known for their sandals and their beards; but mostly for their Christian piety, humility, and charity. So of course they had to die. And die they did, in the tens, hundreds, and thousands.…
 
The history of science is punctuated by both the greatest achievements and the greatest tragedies of human endeavors. The development of organic chemistry illustrates this dichotomy, as some scientists improved the human condition while others facilitated the horrors of genocide. The guise of chemistry also has served as a useful front for fraudste…
 
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