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International Horizons

Ralph Bunche Institute

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International Horizons is a podcast of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies that brings scholarly expertise to bear on our understanding of international issues. The International Horizons podcast is our latest effort to bring our research and scholarship to a broader public. John Torpey, the host of the podcast and director of the Ralph Bunche Institute, holds conversations with prominent scholars and figures in state-of-the-art international issues in our weekly episodes.
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The Durham Centre for Catholic Studies is the first of its kind in British higher education. It represents a creative partnership between academy and church: a centre within the pluralist, public academy for critically constructive Catholic studies of the highest academic standing. The aims of the Centre for Catholic Studies are: -To provide a distinctive forum for the creative analysis of key issues in Catholic thought, culture, and practice. -To engage, inform and shape public and ecclesia ...
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Keeping democracy alive Democracy is not a spectator sport, it requires informed participating citizens. On Keeping Democracy Alive, we delve into dynamics that both inhibit democracy and reinvigorate it. looking into issues from: domestic economic issues to foreign, labor, trade, and education policy, NSA spying, the drug war, prison, police, and judicial issues, electoral and protest politics, middle east realities, right and left wing populism, environmental and energy issues, the wealth ...
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Carl Jung's Red Book + Astrology

Satya Doyle Byock and Carol Ferris

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Exploring Carl Jung’s magnum opus, The Red Book, chapter-by-chapter. In each episode, Salome Institute director, Satya Doyle Byock, and Astrologer Carol Ferris discuss C.G. Jung’s vast work while reflecting on Jungian psychology and history, the astrology of Jung's time and ours, and the political, social, feminist, and anti-racist relevance of this work today. C.G. Jung’s journey into the unconscious began in 1913, just months before the sudden beginning of WWI. It was this descent, laborio ...
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Geopolitics on the Move is a podcast series hosted by Sean Guillory (SRB Podcast) and Fyodor Lukyanov (Russia in Global Affairs) that discusses the crucial geopolitical issues that currently define world politics with some of the best Russian, European, and American thinkers. Geopolitics on the Move is produced by Russia in Global Affairs, the Graduate Initiative in Russian Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies, and the Center for Russian, Eastern European, & Eurasian ...
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Global Recon

John Hendricks

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Welcome to the Global Recon Podcast! Hosted by John Hendricks. Mr. Hendricks sits down with American Intelligence professionals, and American Special Operations personnel to discuss a wide variety of subjects. These topics include historical events, current events, medicine, and geopolitics. Enjoy. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/globalrecon/support
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What do we mean by the word “hero?” Is it not a person of extraordinary courage, putting the good of the country above his or her own safety? That’s Daniel Ellsberg, most famous for the Pentagon Papers which he released The post Dan Ellsberg Died One Year Ago. Long May He Live. appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Sabine speaks with Jonathan Blanks about a buzzword that is not commonly used in classical liberal circles: Systemic Racism. Jonathan defends the notion that it does in fact exist, while providing nuance and context for what exactly systemic racism is. Episode Notes: - An article by Jonathan on Cato defining systemic racism: https://www.cato.org/mu…
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Though it is finally a federal holiday, a lot of people still don’t really know about Juneteenth. It was the day in 1865 when formerly enslaved people learned of the Emancipation Proclamation. But what kind of freedom was it then The post Juneteenth and the Persistent Economic Racial Divide appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Across the United States there is tremendous support for a taxing the wealthiest among us. So why doesn’t it happen? Well, in Massachusetts, it has. As Inequality.org’s Sam Pizzigati explains in this segment, there was powerful resistance to the new The post Inspiration from Massachusetts: A New Wealth Tax Works appeared first on Keeping Democracy …
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Alex speaks with Kevin Erdmann about how zoning, the 2008 economic crisis, and the desire to live away from "those people" is effecting the state of housing today. Episode Notes: Kevin's page at the Mercatus Centre: https://www.mercatus.org/scholars/kevin-erdmann The Erdmann Housing Tracker: https://kevinerdmann.substack.com/ Kevin on X: https://x.…
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In this episode of International Horizons, RBI Director John Torpey spoke with Francesco Ronchi and Udo Zolleis, two European Parliament officials and analysts. With the European Parliament elections taking place shortly after we spoke, they share their insights on the direction that politics in Europe may take in the coming months and years, espec…
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In his new book The Jazzmen: How Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and Count Basie Transformed America, prolific author Larry Tye shares what he learned about the lives of the three men, now recognized as great Americans. The racism they faced The post It Wasn’t Just Politics; The Art of Jazz Integrated America appeared first on Keeping Democracy Al…
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For March's CTRS seminar, Tina Beattie (Professor Emerita of Catholic Studies, University of Roehampton), gives a paper on Language, desire, and creation in the context of Laudato Si'.This seminar forms part of the Catholic Theology Research Seminar Series (CTRS). The CTRS is a regular forum for scholarly discussion of pertinent issues in the Catho…
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For April's CTRS seminar, we were joined by Dr Alana Harris, Reader in Modern British Social, Cultural and Gender History, King’s College London, who will give a paper entitled: ‘Student Power in Christ’: the Young Christian Students, Race Relations and Liberation Theology in Britain after 1968.This seminar forms part of the Catholic Theology Resea…
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Alex speaks with Dominic Parker about his 2023 paper with Dean Lueck entitled "The Economic Origins And Extent Of America's First Environmental Agencies" Episode Notes: Dominic's paper: https://aae.wisc.edu/dparker/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2023/12/Lueck-Parker-Origins-December-2023.pdf Some history on the conservation movement from 1850-1920 via…
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The final chapter in our guest’s new book, Liberalism as a Way of Life asks the question: Requiem for a Liberal Way of Life? Well, is it really over? Reached in Sydney Australia where he’s professor of politics and philosophy The post Under Attack the World Over, What Is Liberalism? appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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In times where conflicts around the globe are an everyday topic, the place of the United Nations in resolving these conflicts is constantly being questioned. In this episode of International Horizons, RBI Director John Torpey discusses this issue with Professor Abiodun Williams, Professor of the Practice of International Politics at Tufts Universit…
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Many Americans were appalled at the violent January 6th assault on the capitol. The thought was: That’s not who we are. But in truth throughout our history, a great number of Americans have supported hierarchies and authoritarianism; freedoim for us The post The Deep Roots of American Illiberalism,Yes Illiberalism appeared first on Keeping Democrac…
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Alex speaks with Ryan Bourne as he explores the misconceptions around inflation and the dangers of price controls, emphasizing how prices act as signals to coordinate economic activity and promote growth. Ryan explains the adverse effects of government intervention in setting prices, such as shortages, quality declines, black markets, and inefficie…
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They wanted to stop abortions, instead there were more after the Dobbs decision than before. One the first segment, Mother Jones magazine writer Julianne McShane tells how women are maintaining their reproductive rights despite the attacks. And on the second The post AntiChoice: In A Hole, Keeps Digging appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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On this episode of International Horizons, Francesco Duina, Charles A. Dana Professor of Sociology at Bates College and Luca Storti, Associate Professor of Economic Sociology at the University of Turin in Italy and a Research Fellow of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, discuss the rise of inequalities around the globe and the di…
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In recent years, the celebrity chef and restaurant has taken the world by storm. The rise of the ‘chefprenaur’ has created a $10 billion dollar industry encapsulating everything from restaurant chains, branded cookware, cook books, television deals, and social media empires. Despite the glamor, one fact still remains: the restaurant scene is an unf…
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Alex speaks with Donner prize nominee Kent Roach about a topic that many Canadians may overlook when thinking about issues that are recurring at home: wrongful convictions and its victims. Episode Notes: - Kent's award-winning book "Wrongfully Convicted: Guilty Pleas, Imagined Crimes, and What Canada Must Do to Safeguard Justice" https://a.co/d/d9m…
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In this episode of International Horizons, Professor Dana Fisher, Director of the Center for Environment, Community, & Equity (CECE) and Professor in the School of International Service at American University, discusses with RBI Director John Torpey her approach to dealing with the climate crisis. Fisher explains how the climate crisis is really a …
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Wisconsin is a key swing state in the upcoming election, with traditions of both real right and real left. On today’s show on-the-ground journalist Christina Lieffring tells us about realities in that 90% rural state. She says to win voters, The post Wisconsin Rural Voters: Challenge and Opportunity for Democrats appeared first on Keeping Democracy…
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Matt speaks with Ethan Nadelmann about drug decriminalization, legalization, and the slow end to the drug war in Canada and the United States, and how successes and failures in both countries compare to those abroad. Episode Notes: The Drug Policy Alliance website: https://drugpolicy.org/ Some history on Portugal's Drug Harm Reduction Programs: htt…
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America is an outlier: here it’s commonly accepted that if you succeed or fail you deserve it. We believe we make our own luck. And we blame ourselves for what’s really random bad luck. But that’s counterproductive, according to the The post Rugged Individualism And The Role of Luck appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Charles Blaha, a former State Department expert on the vetting of U.S. weapons transfers to other countries, helps us understand this important moment in the Israel-Hamas conflict. After an extended period of tension between U.S President Joe Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Biden has decided to freeze some transfers of weapons …
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Matt speaks with Craig Biddle about objectivism and the legacy of Ayn Rand, and how it all ties to classical liberalism, the American ideal, and post-modernism. Episode Notes: Craig's work for the Objective Standard: https://theobjectivestandard.com/author/cbiddle/ Craig on X: https://twitter.com/CraigBiddle Free Ayn Rand books courtesy of the Ayn …
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The environmental movement is often derided as elitist. But as our guest Liza Featherstone of the New Republic and Jacobin magazines tells it, by planting wild miniforests there’s no such polarization. The ultra-rich may have their gated sanctuaries whereas miniforests The post Miniforests as a Joyous Part of Class War appeared first on Keeping Dem…
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We’ve had a lot of impressive guests on the podcast, many who have overcome some real challenges in their lives to build something great, but today’s guest has an especially impressive story. Dr. Magie Cook began her life with 68 brothers and sisters in an orphanage in Mexico. Battling abuse, hunger, and poverty, during her high school years she ea…
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Alex speaks with Bryce Tingle about corporations, how these unique legal entities are governed, how changes we have made to corporate governance has discouraged companies from joining Canada’s public markets, and how the decline in our public market is hurting Canadians. Episode Notes: 1. Bryce’s article “Returning Markets To The Centre Of Corporat…
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This week, RBI Director John Torpey speaks with Amos Goldberg, Professor of Holocaust History at the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, about the ongoing war between Israel and Hamas. Among other rhetorical aspects of the conflict, Goldberg reflects on the meaning of such slogans as “From the …
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For many decades the Supreme Court was reliably on the side of voting rights. Incrementally, quite steadily, the justices have chipped away at our constitutional rights. On this show Professor Josh Douglas and I discuss his new book: The Court The post The Court Versus the Voters: Who’da Thunk it?! appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Matt speaks with Eric Merkley about NIMBYism, the surprising touchpoints for unity between left and right on the subject of housing, and how uncovering the true motivations of NIMBYs has altered Eric's view of the housing crisis. Episode Notes: "Housing for Me, but not for Thee", Eric's paper serving as the basis for most of this conversation: http…
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Listening to working people’s concerns is key. Democrats have almost always won this constituency. That is until recently. Biden’s shift to the economic left is connecting and can yield electoral success. The New Republic’s Timothy Noah says tangible gains like The post Yes, Biden Can WIn the Working Class appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Democracy is itself largely improvisation. Pushing back against the powers that be; the mainstream. Our guest Randy Fertel, author of the new book Winging It; Improv’s Power and Peril in the Age of Trump, says rationality alone is not enough; The post The Power of What Appears to be Improvisation appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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According to a recent study, about 4-6% of all those incarcerated are considered to be wrongly imprisoned. That’s over 70,000 people who are wrongly incarcerated every year. Today’s guest, Justin Brooks has dedicated his life to representing those who have fallen victim to wrongful incarceration. Justin practiced as a criminal defense attorney in W…
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Sabine speaks with Ben Klutsey about political polarization, commonalities between the United States and Canada, and his documentary on the subject entitled "Undivide Us" Episode Notes: The documentary's website with more information, a trailer and the option to request a screening: https://undivideusmovie.com/ Kevin Vallier's "Trust in a Polarized…
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With a presidential campaign in the US just around the corner and populist and authoritarian thinkers gaining broader platforms, University of Notre Dame political scientist A. James McAdams shines a light on the terms being used today by the Far Right to undermine liberal democracy. How successful are these thinkers in changing public views? And h…
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Truman was down and nearly out. Then he did a campaign whistle stop tour of America and beat the odds. TV eye candy is one thing but seeing a president in the flesh connects far better, and connection is needed The post Should Biden Whistle Stop Campaign Across America? appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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The Right gets it; where are Democrats? In his new book What it Took to Win, author and history professor Michael Kazin looks at the last hundred or so years and says it’s clear what has and still works. Whether The post Trumpism is a Movement; Movements Are How Democrats Have Won appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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Alex speaks with Rachael LaRose about the hidden costs of the pandemic, especially as they effected our commercial relationships, loose ties with individuals that once provided much value to our lives, and orthodox communities who rallied to prioritize faith in the face of fear. Episode Notes: - Rachael's webpage with past publications, etc.: https…
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After decades in a coma, the nuclear industry is back. But the truth is nuclear power is not an acceptable stopgap measure, it’s a diversion from real, actually economic, safer solutions. On this show policy analyst Paul Gunter tells the The post Nuclear Rebranding as “Green?” Mere Window Dressing. appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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In the current American version of capitalism, all of us are “thingified:” our only value being as digits on the way to corporate profits. This reflects a core bias in the system toward serving the very richest. But it doesn’t The post Wealth Supremacy is On Autopilot: That’s Not the Only Option appeared first on Keeping Democracy Alive.…
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According to a Pew Research poll, over 40% of adults in the United States are considered to be digitally illiterate, and while America’s crumbling transportation infrastructure often makes headlines, its digital infrastructure is equally as out of date. Organizations from the IRS, to the healthcare system are still relying on technology from the 80…
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Matt speaks with Sam Bowman about the global housing crisis and why, in English-speaking countries in particular, a growing consensus across the political divide is pointing to problems with central planning, NIMBYism and a supply limit as the causes. Episode Notes: Sam Bowman’s on substack: https://substack.com/@sambowman Sam on "Vetocracy": https…
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