Institute of Intellectual History public
[search 0]
×
Best Institute of Intellectual History podcasts we could find (updated May 2020)
Best Institute of Intellectual History podcasts we could find
Updated May 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Join host Ryan McDermott, professor of English at University of Pittsburgh, for conversations from Beatrice Institute, an ecumenical learning and research community that supports advanced inquiry in the Christian intellectual and cultural traditions. Animated by intellectual friendship inside and outside the academy, Beatrice Institute serves all who pursue the Beautiful, the True, and the Good.
 
From Plato to quantum physics, Walter Benjamin to experimental poetry, Frantz Fanon to the history of political radicalism, The Podcast for Social Research is a crucial part of our mission to forge new, organic paths for intellectual work in the twenty-first century: an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring members of the Institute, and occasional guests, conversing about a wide variety of intellectual issues, some perennial, some newly pressing. Each episode centers on a different top ...
 
The Cantemir Institute (CI) is a recently established centre of research at the Faculty of History, University of Oxford, which focuses on the interdisciplinary study of Central and Eastern Europe in its wider European, Eurasian, Mediterranean, and global contexts. The creation of the institute has been made possible through a generous donation from the Berendel Foundation, London.The Cantemir Institute aims to reflect critically on the legacy of intercultural humanism bestowed by two humani ...
 
Because libraries and archives are never neutral. Taking a closer look at the relationships between organizing information and community organizing. We talk to information professionals, activists, and other insightful folks who have thoughts about what we mean when we say, “knowledge is power”. Hosted by two new librarians figuring things out as we go. We are based on the unceded and ancestral territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations.
 
US Naval Institute Warrior Writers: a decade by decade podcast from the Naval Academy Museum on the influence of ideas on the development of the US Navy through the influence of both its intellectual and material capital. We will discuss the thinkers, leaders, politicians, and technical developments that each decade added in the building of the world's greatest navy.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Katie and Brandon McGinley live with their four children in an intentional Catholic neighborhood community. Brandon is a Catholic writer, and Katie is a retired librarian and full-time homeschooler. They discuss how their community began and how they’ve grown since then. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced them to think creatively about community buil…
 
"One major reason Christianity in America has been made into a bad public joke is our failure to rightly understand what Christianity is.” Our guest this week is Lee Camp, Professor at Lipscomb University in Nashville and host of the popular Tokens Show in Nashville. Check out his website: https://www.leeccamp.com His latest book is Scandalous Witn…
 
James Hankins is Professor of History at Harvard University and founder and General Editor of the . He is the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy and Renaissance Civic Humanism and is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on humanist political thought. His most recent book is Virtue Politics - Soulcraft a…
 
Are you tired of watching your beloved cat prance around the house? Have you found the end of the internet? Are you tired of NETFLIX asking if you’re still watching whatever show you’re binging for the up-tinth time? Join Crackers & Grape Juice on Thursday, May 21 at 7:30 PM (eastern) for a live pubcast – think of it as a pub theology in the cloud …
 
Allyson Creasman is an associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, where she specializes in the German reformation. Dr. Creasman paints a thorough picture of the pandemic in Luther’s time, examining the early modern quarantine legislation and the secularization of the healthcare system. She discusses whether Luther would have a Tw…
 
Church Historian, Malcom Foley, joins us on the podcast to talk about the murder Ahmad Arbery within the context of the history of lynching in the American Church. Malcolm is a fifth-year PhD candidate in Baylor’s Department of Religion, studying the history of Christianity. His dissertation investigates African-American Christian responses to lync…
 
Dr Joanne Paul is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Sussex. Her most recent book is Council and Command in Early Modern English Thought (CUP), which was published in the prestigious Ideas in Context series. Professor Iain McDaniel from the University of Sussex interviewed her about the book in April, 2020.…
 
Dr. John Buchmann, executive director of Beatrice Institute, talks with Andrew Yuengert, professor of economics and social thought at Catholic University of America. Their conversation covers what economists have to learn from Aristotle, the limits of rational choice theory, and what theologians stand to gain from economists. They apply these insig…
 
Chris Nygren teaches history of art and architecture and serves as the Director of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Nygren joins us to discuss miracle-making images, specifically those associated with healing from plague. Dr. Nygren examines what these icons meant to people in the past and how they continue to m…
 
Dr. Elise Ryan, scholar of early modern literature and faculty fellow at Beatrice Institute, joins us to discuss the poetry that comes out of experiences of trauma. She and Prof. McDermott take a close look at John Lydgate’s “Dance of Death,” Larry Levis’s “Anastasia and Sandman,” and Gerard Manley Hopkins’s “Carrion Comfort.” They discuss how poet…
 
This episode of the Podcast for Social Research features core faculty member Suzanne Schneider's talk from the French Embassy and the Brooklyn Public Library's Night of Philosophy and Ideas (2020). Her lecture theorizes a culture of "constant vigilance" that pervades different forms of American life--and American death--in the context of guns and t…
 
Our guest this week is Katherine Stewart, a journalist at the New York Times. Katherine's investigative work has focused on the Religious Right and Christian Nationalism. She talks with us about the influence they have had on the Trump White House, their hostility to science, and how it has impacted the response to the coronavirus pandemic. Most re…
 
Episode 26, in which Karen and Allison talk about their feelings during the midst of COVID-19, and books they’ve been reading and shows they’ve been watching in 2020 so far. Read along with the transcript: https://tinyurl.com/y7nx8brh The cover art is done by our friend Andrea Lukic (https://www.andrealukic.com/). You can reach us at: Email: organi…
 
SA Institute of Race Relations — Please note in this episode Gabriel talks about an article published by Max du Preez, however the article in question was written by Max Price. We apologize for the error.McDonald's in Nick's belly, a cigarette in Gabriel's hand, the two crickets in a thorn-tree reflect on South Africa's moans of relief as the count…
 
We talk with Ariel Caldwell, a Teen Services Librarian at Vancouver Public Library, about teen librarianship, community-led work, juggling 5 calendars, using improv to navigate power dynamics, intergenerational programming, and creating fun! You can reach Ariel at ariel.caldwell [at] vpl [dot] ca. Read along with the transcript: https://tinyurl.com…
 
For this special episode, we talked with my friends Brian Stolarz and Dewayne Brown about their new documentary film on Netflix, The Innocence Files. The movie tells the story of Dewayne's wrongful conviction for a cop-killing in Houston, his ten plus years on death row, and Brian's legal struggle to free him. I'm fortunate to have these two as fri…
 
Prof. Ryan McDermott reads the full text of a letter Martin Luther wrote during an outbreak of the bubonic plague in 1527. (Check out our interview with Pastor Eric Andrae for more on this letter!) Luther gives practical and pastoral advice on how Christians should conduct themselves in a time of plague. His recommendations are strikingly relevant …
 
In anticipation of the (now cancelled) British Columbia Library Association 2020 conference on “Libraries, Democracy, and Action,” Sam Popowich, author of Confronting the Democratic Discourse of Librarianship: A Marxist Approach, talks about intellectual freedom and what democracy means in libraries. Follow Sam on Twitter @redlibrarian Read along w…
 
Our guest this week is Professor Jack Levison, author of numerous books including the recent works The Holy Spirit Before Christianity and Boundless God. Jack was a fun, funny, engaging, and insightful guest-- plus, he did his homework enough to know that our producer, Tommie, isn't a dude. Featured in the Huffington Post and on parade.com, relevan…
 
In this episode of "Practical Criticism," Ajay Singh Chaudhary plays the finale of Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera for Rebecca Ariel Porte, who, as usual, doesn't know what the object of the week will be. They discuss true happy endings and false ones, operetta, satire, Brecht and Weill's avant-garde experiments, and Walter Benjami…
 
SA Institute of Race Relations — Gabriel and Nick explore the wonderous cultural artifact that is Tiger King, the complete capture of the WHO by China and the importance of keeping debate open and honest whilst we fight Covid-19. Subscribe on Apple Podcast · Subscribe on Spotify · Subscribe on Google Podcast…
 
Hey folks - we hope this mini episode finds you as well as can be considering the current circumstances. We are putting together an episode COVID-19 and invite you to share your thoughts with us in a short audio clip! Find the full details about how to contribute by listening to the episode or reading the transcript: https://tinyurl.com/wzeduor The…
 
Pastor Eric Andrae is a Lutheran pastor whose pastoral work has now become virtual. As a chaplain for Lutheran Student Fellowship and International Student Ministry, he knows the spiritual struggles his students and parishioners are encountering as they practice social distancing. We chat about how he is reaching out to his congregation, what a Lut…
 
Rev. Paul Abernathy is an Orthodox priest who works with trauma-affected communities in Pittsburgh, PA. Right now, Rev. Abernathy is mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on his community by organizing “community health deputies,” battling food insecurity, and making medical care available to people in isolation through telemedicine. Rev.…
 
Expertise in the age of COVID-19 has been shaped by any fool's ability to start a blog, podcast, or stand behind a podium. In this episode, Jason and Teer sat down with Mrs. Dr. Johanna Hartelius, host of You're Not Accepted, to discuss the Op-Ed she wrote for the Houston Chronicle. Check out the op-ed here: https://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion…
 
** This episode was recorded on March 12, 2020 before UBC Library, where we were recording, was closed to the public, and we were all encouraged to stay home and physically distance from one another. ** In preparation for the now-cancelled British Columbia Library Association (BCLA) 2020 conference, Karen sat down with Y Vy Truong, Rachel Lau, and …
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login