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A daily news show from the publisher of The Monthly and The Saturday Paper. Hear from the country’s best reporters, covering the news as it affects Australia. This is news with narrative, every weekday.
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Aunty Donnas Kerr has spent her life fighting for Indigenous rights. A member of the stolen generations, she grew up seeing members of her family die in custody and marching the streets for justice. In 2022, Aunty Donnas received a phone call about her own son, Joshua Kerr, who had died alone in a prison cell after calling out for help. Today, the …
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A new bill that redefines Australia’s gas industry has a surprising section smuggled into the fine print. It’s designed to change not just the way we approve gas projects, but reshape the balance of power inside the Labor cabinet and take powers away from Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek. So who is behind this major shift, and what does it say …
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Ten years ago, Schwartz Media launched its weekly independent newspaper, The Saturday Paper. On page three of its first edition was a story about a woman who had just become a household name: Rosie Batty. Thrust into the spotlight while grieving the murder of her son Luke at the hands of his father, Rosie Batty used the worst moment of her life to …
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Scott Morrison has left the building. The former prime minister was known for his finely crafted personal image, a dad from the shire who loved rugby league. But Morrison’s career was more notorious than that. From being the minister who forged ahead with robodebt, to proudly displaying a trophy for “stopping the boats” and famously saying he would…
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Pork-barrelling isn’t illegal, but it's one of the dark arts of politics: governments spending money in seats they want to win. So, when does the practice cross the line from politicians faithfully serving the public into pork-barrelling and using taxpayer dollars to essentially bribe voters? Today, chief political correspondent for The Saturday Pa…
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Opposition Leader Peter Dutton may have found the message he’s taking to the federal election: stop the “armada of boats”. It hasn’t been high on the agenda for years, but a couple of weeks ago a boat arriving in far north Western Australia gave him an opportunity to put the issue back on the front page. Today, national correspondent for The Saturd…
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Australia has spent almost 15 years trying to buy new surface ships for the navy, but they are still yet to arrive. That’s because governments have repeatedly thrown out the old plan to introduce their own. Last week, the Albanese government was the latest to reveal their plans for the future of the navy’s surface fleet. So, will it work? Today, em…
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Today on the show, writer Jane Gleeson-White, with her piece from a recent edition of The Monthly. In inner-city Sydney, the heart of the urban jungle, Jane meets environmental lawyer turned activist, Michael Mobbs. His ambition is to transform the concrete warren of terraces and narrow streets of Chippendale into a sustainable oasis. Socials: Stay…
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Julian Assange has spent years fighting to prevent his extradition to the United States and this week, the battle has come down to just two days in court, when his lawyers made what could be their final stand. The British High Court now holds his fate in its hands, as it considers his request for an appeal. So, while supporters anxiously await the …
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Jon Ronson has spent time with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, uncovered the secret US military program to train psychic soldiers and told the stories of the first people to be publicly shamed in the age of social media. Now, Ronson’s investigating the culture wars. From fears about left-wing activists taking over the streets to paranoia about vacc…
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After asylum seekers arrived by boat in Western Australia last week and were sent to Nauru, old debates about offshore immigration detention have been reanimated. It comes as the government has admitted they aren’t able to account for $80 million paid to Papua New Guinea for the welfare and support of people formerly held in offshore detention. So,…
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The Bureau of Meteorology determines a lot: from whether we bring an umbrella to work, to how much warning we get of a natural disaster – all the way to what we know about climate change. But now, serious questions are being raised about the bureau’s management – and it’s emerged that senior executives deliberately misled a federal court. So, why d…
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It was three years ago last week that Brittany Higgins made allegations that rocked Australia. Those allegations resulted in a mistrial, and while Bruce Lehrmann strenuously maintained his innocence, many questions were raised about the handling of Higgins’ claims. So, an inquiry was launched, to see if lessons could be learned to improve the justi…
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Following its loss at the 2019 federal election, touching negative gearing — tax concessions that benefit property investors — has been unthinkable for the Labor Party. But this week the government was drawn into discussions about ending it by The Greens’ housing spokesperson, Max Chandler-Mather, demanding Anthony Albanese address it if he wants t…
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While Taylor Swift arrives in Australia for the biggest shows of her career, she’s found herself at the centre of conspiratorial fantasies sweeping American right-wing politics. Some view her relationship with American football star Travis Kelce — a love story that sounds like an American fairytale — as evidence for a nefarious scheme to re-elect P…
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While some private schools in Australia fret over the construction of their new waterpolo centres or drama theatres, public schools face more pressing challenges, like whether there’s a hole in the roof or enough books for every student. School funding arrangements across the country are now the concern of Jason Clare, the federal education ministe…
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Since becoming opposition leader, Peter Dutton has clawed back in the polls by relentlessly attacking the Labor government – now that approach is being tested. During the first major political battle of the year, over the stage three tax cuts, Peter Dutton’s instincts to fiercely attack the government didn’t seem to work as planned and resulted in …
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The teals of the 2022 election outdid expectations – flipping six historically Liberal seats independent. It’s a result that has energised their backers, Climate 200, who are now looking well beyond wealthy, inner-city electorates for their next wins. So, can they repeat their success in regional seats and shock the major parties again in 2025? Tod…
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Today, writer Konrad Muller reads his latest piece on the quest to learn whether making organic wine is worth the effort. It's called “Notes from a small vineyard” and in it he tries to discover the true effort and cost of going organic and interrogates what difference it makes. Socials: Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram Guest: Writer,…
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The right to disconnect will become law, after an agreement was reached between the government, the Greens and independents. The law will help change our relationship to work and will perhaps allow us to finally log off. But it’s only one part of a massive new batch of workplace reform that is being passed into law. Today, columnist for The Saturda…
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For decades the Reserve Bank has done things the same old way: announcing their decision on interest rates the first Tuesday of every month, with just a short statement. But the RBA’s first decision of the year marked a new era of transparency. After announcing an interest rate pause this week, governor Michele Bullock hosted a candid press confere…
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Nick Feik spent eight months looking into one of the worst institutional failures to protect children from sexual abuse this country has ever seen… It took him to the Tasmanian town of Deloraine and to Ashley Youth Detention Centre – where he found a culture of violence, child sexual abuse, cover-ups, blame-shifting and a system incapable of rootin…
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Videos of emotional protesters outside a private all-boys school in Sydney have gone viral, with some former students of Newington College opposing the school welcoming female enrolment. The topic of single-sex schooling is familiar to Chanel Contos – a consent advocate who has for years accused private boys schools of fostering a dangerous and tox…
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For someone who’s been accused of breaking an election promise, Anthony Albanese isn’t hiding. The prime minister and his front bench have been out selling their new tax cuts, giving interviews and addressing the National Press Club. So what makes the government confident they’ve made the right call? And how does it set up the political chessboard …
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2024 will be democracy’s biggest year. Over four billion people will head to the polls, with major battles in the United States, India, South Africa and Indonesia. One person watching this closely is Anne Applebaum. She was calling out authoritarianism spreading around the world while western leaders were still shaking hands with Vladimir Putin. So…
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The ABC has started the year fighting off accusations of racism, unlawful dismissal and a failure to protect journalists from outside attacks. The case of Antoniette Lattouf’s sacking, a description which the ABC denies, has ignited a debate about the broadcaster’s editorial policies, its coverage of the war in the Middle East and its vulnerability…
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Last weekend’s decision by the International Court of Justice was heralded as a victory by many. South Africa and the Palestinian Authority saw it as a vindication, as orders have been made to prevent any genocidal acts in Gaza and the ICJ will move towards a full trial. Others heralded it as a win for Israel, with the court refusing to make an ord…
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The Labor government promised it would return transparency to government once elected at the 2022 election. More than anyone else that mission was given to the new first law officer of Australia: Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus. So how has he measured up to Labor’s promise? Today, Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus, on his essay in the new edition of The …
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The stage three tax cuts the Labor government said they’d deliver will be altered and now be of greater benefit to lower and middle-income earners. What does the change mean for all of us? Is there such a thing as a good promise to break? And does this decision signal that Anthony Albanese is taking a new approach to being prime minister? Today, co…
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Surrounded by what we know as the Kakadu National Park, the Northern Territory’s Ranger Uranium Mine finally ceased processing in 2021, after nearly 50 years of operation. With the mine now closed, Kakadu’s traditional owners are seeking that the government make good on the original promise of a national park in their care. Socials: Stay in touch w…
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This year, the attempt to whip up nationalism over January 26 has taken a different turn. While politicians and the media talk about pride in celebrating Australia Day, many businesses and cultural institutions are moving ahead with not recognising a holiday that celebrates colonisation. So is the culture war actually failing? Is the debate over? A…
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All over the world, humanity is rushing to regulate the development of artificial intelligence. Now, the Australian government has announced its first steps toward controlling the development of AI. But is it already too late? And do we really understand what the risks are? The technology is advancing at such a fast pace that some examples are beco…
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For years, Gabriel Shipton has been desperately advocating for the release of his older brother, Julian Assange. It’s a fight that may have nearly reached its end. Next month, Julian Assange has one final chance, to request an appeal of his extradition to the United States. If it fails, medical experts insist Assange will take his own life. Today, …
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At the end of last year, the government rushed through new laws that have largely flown under the radar. The new citizenship act, which was passed following a High Court decision, allows judges to strip a dual citizen of their Australian citizenship if they repudiate ‘Australian values’. But, what are Australian values? And can they be defined, any…
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Supermarket prices have finally caught the attention of our leaders. While the cost of living crisis continues, customers and, now, politicians are becoming increasingly fed up with the price of groceries, while Woolworths and Coles rake in billions of dollars in profits. So, what can be done about it? And will government scrutiny be enough to fix …
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Professional sport has grappled with how to address athletes’ domestic violence and sexual assault allegations for years. It’s an issue that’s currently unfolding before viewers worldwide, who are tuning into the Australian Open in Melbourne. Tennis star Alexander Zverev is playing at the tournament while facing domestic violence allegations and an…
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Donald Trump has passed the first electoral test of his ambitious campaign to return to the White House. The former president convincingly won the Republican caucus in Iowa, asserting his stronghold over the party, less than four years after losing the presidential election to Joe Biden. Trump is now likely to become the Republican presidential nom…
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The ABC is facing mounting scrutiny over the sacking of radio presenter Antoinette Lattouf, just days into a short-term contract. In a Fair Work case against the ABC, Lattouf alleges she was dismissed over a pro-Palestine social media post, as well as claiming systemic racial discrimination within the organisation against people of Arab or Muslim b…
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The catholic church is known for running schools and charity services in Australia, but it also operates more than 20 publicly funded hospitals. It’s an arrangement that helped bring healthcare to the public before Australia was even federated, but it often goes unnoticed by patients. So, what happens when a hospital run by a catholic body gets int…
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Israel’s war against Hamas in Gaza now seems like it will last even longer, with the Israeli military saying it is prepared for a long conflict – one that could last all year. But the longer the war continues, the more devastating the humanitarian situation in Gaza becomes, and the higher the chance of more war breaking out across the region. Today…
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A clinic inside Melbourne’s Royal Women’s Hospital is quietly changing lives through the power of tattoos. The Combined Breast Service offers breast reconstruction, including making nipples anew with tattoo ink. It’s an offering that empowers post-mastectomy patients and breast cancer survivors, who often grapple with accepting their new chests. To…
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Today on the show, writer Richard King, with his piece ‘Machine Learning’ about the AI chatbot ChatGPT. He begins his story with discourse sweeping a university campus as AI reaches the hands of ordinary students and teachers. How will this technology – still only a few months old – change not only teaching and marking, but the very nature of the t…
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Today on the show, author Christos Tsiolkas with a recent piece from The Monthly. “The Past is a foreign country: they do things differently there” – is the memorable opening line of L.P. Hartley’s 1953 novel, The Go-Between. It’s a line that has stuck with Christos Tsiolkas since he read it in high school - and a sentiment that has made him reflec…
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Today on the show, author Carrie Tiffany, with her piece from The Monthly. After the death of her mother, Carrie reflects on the hold of sugar upon her family’s health and history. Carrie will read her piece, ‘Sweet Regret’ after a short conversation with the Editor of the 7am podcast, Scott Mitchell. (This episode first aired in July 2023) Socials…
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Today on the show, writer and filmmaker John Safran, with his piece from the latest edition of The Monthly. Father Bob Maguire was an icon in his own right, but for many, they knew him through his years of conversation with John Safran on TV and their Sunday Night radio show. Father Bob passed away earlier this year and received a state funeral in …
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Described by the Washington Post as "one of our greatest living novelists", Richard Flanagan has been writing for more than three decades. His 2013 novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North won the Booker Prize and his essays have been published across Australia and internationally. This week Michael heads to Tasmania to speak with Richard at his hom…
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Melissa Lucashenko writes about big ideas and brutal experiences, but she does so with grace, with generosity and – maybe above all else – a rich sense of humour. In this episode, from Schwartz Media’s podcast Read This, Michael sits down with Melissa for a conversation about her new book, Edenglassie, and they discuss history, eccentric characters…
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George Saunders is one of literary fiction's most acclaimed living writers. Along with his many collections of short stories, he also published the Booker Prize-winning novel Lincoln in the Bardo. In this episode, from Schwartz Media’s podcast Read This, Michael chats with him about his life and career, and George reveals the three words that made …
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Kate Grenville has spent her career bringing history to life, often using the lives of her own family to tell stories about the kinds of voices who are often left out of the official record. In this episode, from Schwartz Media’s podcast Read This, Michael heads to Kate's house to discuss her latest novel, Restless Dolly Maunder, and why she is pre…
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Award-winning writer and historian Tony Birch grew up listening to stories from his nan, Alma. In this episode, from Schwartz Media’s podcast Read This, Tony shares how Alma's advice has influenced his life and his writing. (This episode was first published in July 2023) Reading list: Shadowboxing, Tony Birch, 2006 Blood, Tony Birch, 2011 Ghost Riv…
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