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LSE Act.Count.Think

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LSE Act.Count.Think

London School of Economics and Political Science

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LSE Act.Count.Think is a student-led podcast that serves as a platform for professionals and scholars to share their insights in order to keep you updated with the most pressing matters in business and finance. The conversation is conducted by Ronojit Dasgupta(2020/21), Lewis Patterson (2019/20) and Danyal Adnan (2018/19), MSc Accounting and Finance students at The London School of Economics and Political Science.
 
I am lucky. As part of the TRIUM Global EMBA team, I get to interact with some of the most interesting and informed people on the planet. This is never more true than in the conversations I have at the margins of the official program – exchanges with people who enrich, educate and entertain. TRIUM Connects seeks to reproduce those moments in a series of recorded conversations on topics from the worlds of business, economics, leadership and political economy. I hope the podcast gives people a ...
 
This is a conversation podcast by Duncan Green, strategic adviser for Oxfam GB, author of ‘How Change Happens’ and Professor in Practice at the London School of Economics. This personal reflection is not intended as a comprehensive statement of the agreed policies of either Oxfam or the LSE. https://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/
 
All things digital for the HE, FE, and broader education sector - bought to you by SMILE (wearesmile.com) - dedicated to helping universities and colleges become more authentic, timely, and personalised through creative services and tools. If you’re involved with digital for the education sector - and looking for news, insight, and opinions - you’re in the right place!
 
Some dream, others build. On this podcast, guests do both. The vision for The Idealists. (formerly Grit & Grace) was born from a deep desire to understand how the world’s most high-achieving women think about the world. In this insightful bi-monthly podcast, entrepreneur and host Melissa Kiguwa spans the globe interviewing the world's most audacious women to learn what insights they’ve gleaned on their journey and the hard-earned wisdom gained along the way. THE IDEALISTS. is sponsored by el ...
 
The Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism (ASEN) is an interdisciplinary student-led research association founded by research students and academics in 1990 at the London School of Economics & Political Science. ASEN seeks to fulfil two broad objectives: 1. To facilitate and maintain an interdisciplinary, global network of researchers, academics and other scholars interested in ethnicity and nationalism; and 2. To stimulate, produce, and diffuse world-class research on ethni ...
 
This Podcast is created and curated by Deepak Jayaraman (an Executive Coach and a Leadership Advisor). He lives in Mumbai and works with successful Senior Executives by helping them play to their unique potential but with a sharp focus on transitions (business or career). Just like businesses need to think about "where to play" and "how to win", leaders need to be coherent about "where to go" and "how to grow" in their journeys. Deepak works with them during pivotal moments to help them with ...
 
Impact Hustlers features entrepreneurs and changemakers solving the world's biggest problems and creating massive social impact. Hosted by Maiko Schaffrath this podcast shares the stories of those who connect impact with profit and build businesses and solutions that solve problems such as climate change and poverty. Learn how entrepreneurship can be the solution to the world's biggest environmental and social problems.Learn more: www.impacthustlers.com
 
The Curious Quant series, hosted by Michael Kollo, is a discussion between technically-minded professionals in the financial services, technology and data science fields. It examines the application of new data and new methodologies to common problems in financial markets. Michael Kollo has a PhD in Finance is from the London School of Economics where he lectured in quantitative finance in addition to Imperial College and at the University of New South Wales. He has created models and led qu ...
 
We are a "deep dive" news podcast, for Americans who get their news from the Internet. Our mission is to give the listener succinct, fact based analysis both non-ideological and independent from a California, Silicon Valley perspective. Your host Jim Herlihy is a published author: his novel “Deceit and Dirty Money” is available on line. He served as President of the SF Public Library Commission 1992 - 1996. While working in Latin America, he was a stringer for The Economist, The Times and th ...
 
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When did schooling become compulsory? How far did education differ between girls and boys? And why does the British school year start in September? Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Susannah Wright answers some of our listeners’ most popular questions on the history of British schools – from the establishment of the earliest schools to the surpri…
 
Links I Liked Is behavioural economics (aka nudge theory) blocking the path to progress? “We have already spent everything we had in our own wallets”: How international aid is failing Ukrainian responders – and what to do about it Why We Fight: This Year’s Big Book on Development? Latin America in turmoil, an update Can INGOs really separate power …
 
America’s Supreme Court has essentially shorn the Environmental Protection Agency of its agency in making national policy. We ask what that means for the climate-change fight. Hong Kong is marking 25 years since its handover from Britain to China; the promised “one country, two systems” approach is all but gone already. And why moustaches are back …
 
Oskar Jensen introduces the characters roaming the streets of Georgian and Victorian London, from beggars to ballad singers. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he explores what it would have been like to live and work on the streets of the capital, sharing stories of entrepreneurial street sweepers, impatient milkmaids, kidnapped children and timid hot-c…
 
It is a remarkable turnaround for a notorious family: the late dictator’s son just took the reins. But how will he govern? Scotland’s separatist party is again pushing for an independence referendum. That will probably fail—and empower the very prime minister that many Scots love to hate. And, why pilots in Ukraine are using an outdated, inaccurate…
 
In the fourth episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove considers the role of religion in late Roman Britain with Dr David Petts. They look at how far Christianity was embedded in Britain by the fourth century, what other religious practices existed alongside it and, crucially, how far adherence to the Christian fait…
 
Set in San Francisco in the mid-1970s, Hitchcock captures the Zeitgeist of the City by the Bay at that time. A light hearted thriller that features an amusing couple as the protagonists - she a clairvoyant, he an aspiring actor/taxi driver, they cross paths with a calculating pair of villains. Listen to this podcast before watching the film for a r…
 
US Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr has written to Apple and Google requesting that they remove the Tik Tok app from their stores. He argues that Tik Tok fails to adhere to Apple's and Google's own security practices and as such, should be dropped as an App Store offering. The ball is in the tech giants' court to respond. --- Send i…
 
In a global period of belt-tightening, popular anger will spill over. Our correspondent visits places where powderkegs seem closest to being lit; our predictive model suggests where might be next. China’s spies have a deserved reputation for hacking and harassing—but fall surprisingly short on other spooky skills. And why America is suffering a sho…
 
Giacomo Casanova is remembered for his reputation as a serial seducer. But according to author Leo Damrosch, he was far more than that. Speaking with Emily Briffett, Leo explains how Casanova was also an aspiring priest, spy, army officer and Masonic master, who led a colourful life that saw him interact with kings, empresses and some of the most f…
 
War in Ukraine has stiffened the alliance’s spine; leaders meeting this week will refashion troop-deployment plans reflecting a vastly changed security situation. The property sector makes a staggering contribution to carbon emissions, but our correspondent says it is not cleaning up nearly as fast as other industries are. And reflecting on the lif…
 
In this episode of The Idealists. (formerly Grit & Grace), host and entrepreneur Melissa Kiguwa interviews Jenny Atout Ahlzen, one of the Managing Founders of Amam Ventures, an impact investment fund based in Jordan that provides risk capital to Small and Medium Sized enterprises that are committed to diversity and inclusion. In this episode, Jenny…
 
Matt Cook and Alison Oram discuss their new book Queer Beyond London, which uncovers the LGBTQ experience in four English cities – Brighton, Manchester, Plymouth and Leeds – from the sixties to the noughties. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, they consider how local people, places and politics shaped LGBTQ lives in each city, establishing individual cu…
 
Jonathan Davis is the author of the Investment Trusts Handbook, the editorially independent annual described as "the definitive guide to the sector". He joins Richard to take a closer look at why he considers trusts to be the "connoisseur’s choice", closed and open-ended investments and whether we are in a bear market.Enjoyed listening? Please like…
 
With the increasing severity of the climate problem, thankfully, there are organizations like Cervest that offer their climate intelligence program to empower companies and individuals to analyze their climate risk and make climate-informed decisions. For this reason, Cervest’s Founder and CEO Iggy Bassi joins us today to educate us on why we need …
 
The Supreme Court ruling has convulsed the country; passing the question of abortion rights to the states will divide America yet further. We ask what it means for the court to go so plainly against public opinion, examine the woeful effects the changing scenario will have on women and speak to one woman whose life was saved by a now-threatened pro…
 
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their 15 minutes of fame. In today’s episode, Suzannah Lipscomb tells Emily Briffett about the life of Marguerite de Navarre, a 16th-century royal player who had a major influence on both the Renaissance and R…
 
Who founded the Mali empire? What impact did Islam have on its trajectory? What were its interactions with medieval Europe like? And what made its greatest leader, Mansa Musa, so fabulously wealthy? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Kevin MacDonald answers listener questions on one of Africa’s greatest historical powers. See acast.com/privacy for privacy …
 
The United States Supreme Court overturned this 49 year landmark precedent which gave a woman the right to an abortion. As a result of this decision, regulation of abortion will be de-constitutionalized and returned to the states. But 26 states plan to restrict or abolish abortion. The remaining 24 states where abortion will remain available may be…
 
Yesterday, America’s Supreme Court issued its most important Second Amendment ruling in more than a decade, striking down a New York law that tightly regulated concealed carrying of guns. The ruling means cities will probably see a lot more armed people. Our correspondent caught up with Ukraine’s First Lady. And new research into the origins of the…
 
Kyle Caldwell and Sam Benstead explain why professional investors are extremely bearish at the moment, and point out that the world’s largest fund manager is not ‘buying the dip’. The duo also name the income funds and trusts proving more popular with investors over the past couple of months, and run through a pledge made by respected investor Nick…
 
In the latest instalment of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy talks to Matt Elton about the political pressures and fissures that defined the 1970s and 80s – and the ways in which they shaped the corporation’s output. (Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). …
 
It’s straightforward to make your end-of-life treatment preferences known, yet few of us do. Simona Botti is intrigued by the decisions we make as healthcare consumers, so she set out to look into what was going on here – and what this might tell us about ourselves.Simona Botti is Professor of Marketing at London Business School. Kathy Brewis is Se…
 
When you get an email from your boss after hours, it can feel like there’s a pressure to respond straight away – which adds stress to our lives. In this episode of The Why Podcast, Laura Giurge explores the psychology around this and suggests ways we can foster healthier emailing habits for happier minds. Laura Giurge is a Research Associate of Org…
 
Boards failures are shocking and often scandalous – yet, says Randall S Peterson, they aren’t inevitable. In this episode of The Why Podcast, he talks us though the six types of dysfunctional board he has identified in his new book and suggests what to look out for to preempt disaster. Randall S Peterson is Professor of Organisational Behaviour and…
 
In much of the world, things are improving for sexual minorities. The opposite is true in China, where authorities are cracking down on the LGBT community. Bangladesh is suffering its worst flooding in living memory, but with a surprisingly low death toll (so far). And which city topped the EIU’s annual Liveability Index. For full access to print, …
 
In the third episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove looks at how far Britain was a militarised state between the third and fifth centuries. Historian Dr Rob Collins explains how Roman Britain was set up to support the military machine of the wider empire, and what might have happened when that military machine beg…
 
Russia is making steady, piecemeal gains in the region; Ukrainian forces are simply outgunned. That disparity defines the war’s progression—for now. More than 20 countries have radio stations run by and for prisoners, giving those inside a voice. And why a cannabis derivative is proving popular among Japan’s elderly. For full access to print, digit…
 
Simon Jenkins considers the enigmatic story of the Celts, and asks whether any such people ever actually existed. Speaking with David Musgrove, he also questions what the term ‘Celtic’ should mean to us today. (Ad) Simon Jenkins is the author of The Celts: A Sceptical History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresour…
 
Alex Farcet is Founder of Rainmaking and Startupbootcamp, and these are just two of the many hats he wears. Rainmaking harnesses the power of entrepreneurship to help corporate companies implement innovation and impact initiatives, and Startupbootcamp is currently the largest industry-focused startup accelerator in the world. In this episode, Alex …
 
The physical geography of countries, mountains, rivers, lakes, coastlines etc largely dictate the political decisions of their leaders. We tend to overlook those critical facts when conflicts arise. And no country is as much a victim of its flawed geography as Russia. On the other hand, few nations are as advantaged by their geography as the United…
 
A motley collection of parliamentarians, now without its whisper-thin majority, has crumbled. That will force the country back to the ballot box—and back to familiar political turmoil. Increasing numbers of American cities are enticing people with cash incentives, but do such policies work? And why drumming helps people with emotional and behaviour…
 
Sally Smith considers the contributions made and significant firsts achieved by British women in the field of aviation, from ballooning and parachuting, to piloting airships and fixed-wing aircraft. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she highlights the extraordinary lives these pioneers led and the trials they faced in order to achieve success. (Ad) Sal…
 
Contributor(s): Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison | This event explores the financial and economic prospects for the region’s emerging economies, the impact of COVID-19 on development prospects, and more.By Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison
 
Contributor(s): Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison | This event explores the financial and economic prospects for the region’s emerging economies, the impact of COVID-19 on development prospects, and more.By Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison
 
Contributor(s): Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison | This event explores the financial and economic prospects for the region’s emerging economies, the impact of COVID-19 on development prospects, and more.By Piroska Nagy Mohacsi, Dr Angela Lusigi, Dr Ernest Addison
 
resident Emmanuel Macron has lost his majority in France’s National Assembly as voters flooded both to the far right and far left. A second term filled with confrontation and compromise awaits him. The shadowy world of corporate spying is broadening to far more than just cola or fried-chicken recipes. And when scare-tactic road-death statistics lea…
 
Claire Jowitt discusses the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk Claire Jowitt speaks to Matt Elton about the news of the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk – and why it might be the most important maritime find in decades. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
In our latest everything you wanted to know episode, Dr John Jacob Woolf answers listener questions on Edwardian Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he touches on subjects ranging from suffrage, labour movements, empire and international relations, to leisure time, childhood and roller-skating. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform…
 
Contributor(s): Dr Jonathan Birch, Huw Golledge, Penny Hawkins | In the UK, a new law requires all policymakers to have due regard for animal sentience. This law has given new urgency to the question: which other animals are sentient? Might some invertebrates, such as octopuses, crabs, snails, or even insects, have experiences that deserve respect …
 
Contributor(s): Dr Jonathan Birch, Huw Golledge, Penny Hawkins | In the UK, a new law requires all policymakers to have due regard for animal sentience. This law has given new urgency to the question: which other animals are sentient? Might some invertebrates, such as octopuses, crabs, snails, or even insects, have experiences that deserve respect …
 
Contributor(s): Ed Miliband MP | For the past four years, Ed Miliband has been discovering and interviewing brilliant people all around the world who are successfully tackling the biggest problems we face, transforming communities and pioneering global movements. Go Big draws on the most imaginative and ambitious of these ideas to provide a vision …
 
Contributor(s): Ed Miliband MP | For the past four years, Ed Miliband has been discovering and interviewing brilliant people all around the world who are successfully tackling the biggest problems we face, transforming communities and pioneering global movements. Go Big draws on the most imaginative and ambitious of these ideas to provide a vision …
 
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