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Each week we pair a comedian with a scientist, to break down the scientifically inaccurate elements of popular movies and TV shows. Warning: There will be spoilers. Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/goodbadscience to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.
 
Throughout my training and practice as a physician I have come to one very disappointing conclusion: Western medicine isn’t helping people lead better lives. Now that I’ve realized this, I’ve become obsessed with understanding what makes us healthy or ill. I want to live the best life I can and I want to be able to share this knowledge with others so that they can do the same. This podcast is the result of my relentless search to understand the roots of chronic disease. If you want to know h ...
 
The Naked Eye Podcast is a show designed to help people learn how to see clearly with the naked eye. No glasses, no contacts, no laser eye surgeries… just natural vision improvement. Together we’ll explore the holistic side of eyecare and how natural alternatives like the Bates Method, Yoga, Meditation, Breathwork and more can give you healthier eyes, which leads to better eyesight and insight. Nathan Oxenfeld will be teaching you natural vision tips and vision enhancement practices, coverin ...
 
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Embodied

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Embodied

North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

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Sex and relationships are intimate – and sometimes intimidating to talk about. Host Anita Rao guides us on an exploration of our brains and our bodies that touches on taboo territory.
 
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Why? The Podcast

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Why? The Podcast

Heidi Hedquist/ Luke Poling

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Naked skydivers. Jeopardy champions. Rodeo clowns. Suzi Quatro. Professional mascots. Competitive eaters. Astronauts. Cherry Vanilla. Renaissance fair kings. Benjamin Franklin. Olympic Curlers. Mandalorians. Gay erotica writers. Mermaids. Fruit cake tossers. Martha Wash. Dolphin Lovers. Hair collectors. Strippers. And satanists. We've talked to them all. On Why? every week we talk with another guest leading a fascinating life.
 
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The Brain Candy Podcast

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The Brain Candy Podcast

Susie Meister & Sarah Rice - Wave Podcast Network

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The award winning Brain Candy Podcast is Candy for Your Left Brain and Your Right Brain. Hosts Sarah Rice and Susie Meister from MTV's The Challenge discuss what gets their wheels turning in the worlds of pop culture, literature, science, and psychology. They will share their favorite insights on everything from reality TV to quantum physics. So enjoy some candy for your noggin with the Brain Candy Podcast. https://thebraincandypodcast.com/
 
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show series
 
Satellite swarms may outshine the night sky's natural constellations Mega-constellations from those satellites will be visible to the naked eye, simulations suggest Artificial satellites like SpaceX's Starlink constellations will leave streaks in photos of the sky taken by researchers and amateur astronomers alike.…
 
Victor Perton is the Founder and Chief Optimism Officer at the Centre for Optimism, an offshoot of the Australian Leadership Project. Comprised of over 3500 leaders in 65 countries, the Centre for Optimism aims to help leaders combat negativity by asking the question “what makes you Optimistic?”. A respected author, speaker, moderator, barrister an…
 
Dating is hard enough, but try being naked, on an island with 15 strangers all looking for love! On this episode of The Good, The Bad, and The Science, we are discussing the Discovery + original NAKED AND AFRAID OF LOVE. We talk about surviving the elements, and dating disasters! Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life…
 
Kara Collier is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), Licensed Dietitian/Nutritionist (LDN), and Certified Nutrition Support Clinician (CNSC) who specializes in glucose control and metabolism. She graduated from Purdue University and previously worked at Memphis VA Medical Center, as a clinical dietitian at Providence Hospital, and in a manage…
 
Today we realize we used to fat-shame ourselves in our early episodes, and we're relieved we have evolved a bit since then. Sarah describes a roller coaster in Japan that is leaving people w/ spinal fractures, and she reveals why she is surprisingly afraid of coasters. We discuss some of the more humiliating challenges we've participated in, and th…
 
What gases are present in lava? What happens when hot magma meets cold water in the sea? How different is an animal's brain to my own? How much of my intelligence is down to genes, and how much is the environment in which I grew up? Do photons weigh anything? Is there a cancer pandemic? And will a spoon in the neck of the bottle keep champagne fizz…
 
Sleep is business. Plain and simple. Other than optimizing my food, there is nothing I have found to be more beneficial to my performance every day than optimizing my sleep. This means I don't mess around with these tenets... Light on my skin and eyes and grounding (usually through surfing) first thing in the am... I don't wear sunglasses, ever. I …
 
Wild water swimming is becoming ever more popular and, according to a new study published recently in Cell Reports Medicine, combining dips in cold water with time in a hot sauna could have potential health benefits. Verner Viisainen spoke with senior author Camilla Scheele to find out more... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Nak…
 
Today we hear about a woman suing GEICO for an STD she got. Sarah was shamed by her doctor over an STD test. We hear about a women's chess tournament that got a sponsorship that raised some eyebrows (and heart rates). We discuss Dave Chapelle and the reason why people are upset about his jokes. Susie discusses a documentary about public shaming, an…
 
A Jupiter-like planet orbiting a white dwarf hints at our solar system's future Only a handful of worlds have ever been found around one of the dim, dense stars A white dwarf star (illustrated at left) barely illuminates a planet (right) whose mass and distance from its star resemble those of Jupiter.…
 
Stone Age humans or their relatives occasionally trekked through a green Arabia Long-ago rains drew hominids in phases to what's now dry desert Excavations at the Jubbah oasis (shown) in northern Saudi Arabia produced stone tools that, along with nearby lake bed finds, indicate that hominids periodically trekked through the region starting around 4…
 
A beautiful oak leaf portrait won the 2021 Nikon Small World photography contest Annual competition features snapshots of the world hidden from the naked eye In this closeup view of a southern live oak leaf, shown at 60 times magnification, protective structures called trichomes are colored white, vessels are in cyan and stomata in purple.…
 
Ancient DNA shows the peopling of Southeast Asian islands was surprisingly complex A 7,300-year-old skeleton had deep East Asian roots and a Denisovan heritage DNA from an Indonesian woman's 7,300-year-old partial skeleton, which includes the skull parts shown here, may help to rewrite the story of ancient human migrations to certain Southeast Asia…
 
A pinch of saturated fat could make tempering chocolate a breeze Phospholipids are key to achieving a melt-in-the-mouth texture Chocolatiers have to heat and cool liquid chocolate multiple times to achieve a glossy, velvety texture.
 
50 years ago, X-rays revealed what ancient Egyptians kept under wraps Excerpt from the October 9, 1971 issue of Science News In 1971, X-rays of the mummy of Egyptian pharaoh Amenophis II revealed arthritis in his backbone.
 
Stone Age people used bone scrapers to make leather and pelts At least 90,000 years ago, humans probably employed the tools to fashion clothes from animal skins Excavations in a Moroccan cave have uncovered ancient evidence of animal skinning and leather or pelt preparation using tools such as this hide scraper (shown at different angles) made from…
 
Work on complex systems, including Earth's climate, wins the physics Nobel Prize Syukuro Manabe, Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi each found hidden patterns in disordered systems Syukuro Manabe's and Klaus Hasselmann's work laid the foundation for simulations that capture the immense complexity of climate and other Earth systems such as ocean su…
 
How metal-infused jaws give some ants an exceptionally sharp bite Body parts reinforced with zinc and manganese make impossible cuts possible, a study suggests Leaf-cutting ants ( Atta cephalotes ) have jaws lined with teeth kept razor sharp by interspersing zinc atoms among proteins.
 
An agile gecko found in India named after the legendary Jackie Chan 12 newly described gecko species get scientific names inspired by their features An extremely agile gecko found in the Western Ghats of India is named Jackie's day gecko ( Cnemaspis jackieii) after martial arts legend Jackie Chan.
 
How AI can help forecast how much Arctic sea ice will shrink IceNet can predict the future of Arctic sea ice months in advance with 95 percent accuracy Forecasting the annual extent of sea ice, seen here in the Chukchi Sea near Alaska, has long proved a challenge for polar scientists.
 
5 cool things to know about NASA's Lucy mission to the Trojan asteroids The spacecraft is the first headed to the space rocks that tag along in Jupiter's orbit The Lucy spacecraft, illustrated here sidling up to one of the Trojan asteroids in Jupiter's orbit, is expected to achieve a number of interplanetary firsts.…
 
Huge numbers of fish-eating jaguars prowl Brazil's wetlands Most jaguars are loners that hunt landlubbing mammals, but not the big cats of the Pantanal A jaguar ( Panthera onca ) swims in flooded wetlands in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso.
 
Astronomers may have seen a star gulp down a black hole and explode It's the first firm evidence of a rare cosmic phenomenon Jets of energy explode from a star that has cannibalized its dead companion in this artist's illustration.
 
Here's what we know about booster shots for Moderna's and J&J's COVID-19 vaccines Additional doses can help rev up the immune systems of vulnerable people On October 14 and 15, an FDA panel gave the thumbs-up for people who got Moderna's or Johnson and Johnson's COVID-19 vaccines to receive a booster shot, paving the way for those people to join mi…
 
A newfound boa sports big eyes and a square nose The snake is the first boa species discovered in the Dominican Republic in more than a century The newly described Hispaniolan vineboa ( Chilabothrus ampelophis ) has distinctive large eyes and zigzag coloring, which tipped off researchers that they had stumbled upon a new species, one that is among …
 
Nostalgia may have bona fide benefits in hard times, like the pandemic Researchers hope to develop therapies that trigger special memories for mental health gains Lonely people are often unhappy, but they also tend to think more about key moments from their pasts.
 
Infants may laugh like some apes in their first months of life As babies age, their laughter starts to sound more like that of human adults Researchers scoured the internet for clips of laughing 3- to 18-month-olds and had experts and nonexperts listen for clues to laughter's development in babies' breaths.…
 
These charts show that COVID-19 vaccines are doing their job Immunizations are keeping the majority of vaccinated people out of the hospital As of August 26, more than 100,000 people are hospitalized for COVID-19 in the United States levels not seen since January amid the winter surge.
 
New 'vortex beams' of atoms and molecules are the first of their kind Scientists previously made twisted beams of light and electrons Scientists made spiraling beams of atoms and molecules, known as vortex beams, for the first time.
 
The spoken word album 'Experimental Words' weaves rhyme with reason Researchers and poets create pieces that explore the space between science and art To create the album cover for Experimental Words , graphic and web designer Ben Gregory created an interactive algorithm that visualizes the words from the album's poems.…
 
NASA's Perseverance rover snagged its first Martian rock samples The rock bits are the first from Mars slated to eventually return to Earth The Perseverance rover drilled two cylinders of stone out of a Martian rock called Rochette in early September.
 
Fossil tracks may reveal an ancient elephant nursery Preserved footprints of newborn pachyderms are roughly the size of drink coaster Some footprints (one shown) of ancient elephant calves at a site in southern Spain were so clearly preserved that the imprints of toes could be seen (left side of print).…
 
A supernova's delayed reappearance could pin down how fast the universe expands The catch: We have to wait until about 2037 for an answer This cluster of galaxies, seen in a Hubble telescope image, contorts the light of a galaxy far behind it into arcs (orange).
 
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