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Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
 
We often overlook Islamic history as a learning tool. The history of Islam is not only important for Muslims, but important for everyone. Islam and the people who call themselves Muslims have made an enormous impact on our world. The Islamic History Podcast is about discovering that history in a fun and interesting way.
 
We are a slightly mad, always fun podcast bringing you all the History you love and a lot that you didn‘t know you‘d love until you heard it here! Recommended by BBC Radio, and presented by acclaimed historian Alexandra Churchill, with Matt Bone and Zack White.
 
For many episodes to come, we'll be exploring the rich history of Poland. From it's humble beginnings, we'll follow the people of Poland as they form their own unique cultural identity, rise into a great European power, cross paths with the Mongol Horde, save Europe from an Ottoman invasion, and do their best to keep their independence firm from one generation to the next.
 
Why don't women's clothes have more pockets? When and where did someone decide that men shouldn't wear skirts? How does a girl go about seizing control of an evil empire? Did the Amazons really exist and why wasn't I born as one of them? In short, what have the women of the world been up to while not getting covered in the standard history books? I explore these and other questions in this thematic approach to women's history.
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages.
 
The Ottoman Empire lasted for six hundred years and dominated the Middle East and Europe, from Budapest to Baghdad and everything in between. The sultans ruled three continents. But they didn't do it on their own. This podcast looks at the cast of characters who made the empire run: the sultan, the queen mother, the peasant, the janissary, the harem eunuch, the holy man, and the outlaw.
 
"The Visual Past” showcases the latest research by scholars who explore the visual, spatial, and material culture that shaped the Ottoman world. The series will address not only objects, images, and calligraphy, but also works of architecture that were themselves contexts for other media. Before being designated historical landmarks or enshrined in museum displays, these rich artistic and architectural products constituted an intrinsic part of Ottoman life, intersecting with and affecting al ...
 
"Women, Gender, and Sex in the Ottoman World" is a series of podcasts that pulls together women’s history and the history of gender and sex in the Ottoman Empire and beyond. It explores the particular historical experiences of women and girls based on the conviction that returning the lives, experiences, and ideas of women to the historical record will change the way we look at historical periods and transformations at large. It also investigates the ways in which gender and sexuality can se ...
 
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AnthroPod is produced by the Society for Cultural Anthropology (http://www.culanth.org). Each episode, we explore what anthropologists and anthropology can teach us about the world and people around us.
 
Jerusalem Unplugged is the only podcast dedicated to Jerusalem, its history, and its people. Dr. Roberto Mazza is interviewing scholars, activists, politicians, artists, journalists, religious men and women, and everybody that in one way or another is connected to Jerusalem. Podcasts will bring you closer to the city and understand its complex layout and they uncover a wealth of knowledge. You will hear about a Jerusalem you never heard of. Support the Podcast at https://supporter.acast.com/ ...
 
Law is a powerful lens for the study of the Ottoman Empire and the Islamic world. Bringing together diverse sources and new perspectives for legal history, this series explores law in and around the Ottoman Empire as a complex and capacious system underpinning the exercise of power inherent in all human relationships. Our presenters study the law to gain entry into the Ottoman household, exploring the relationships between husbands and wives, masters and slaves. Others use the legal system t ...
 
SHIELDS HIGH: The Battles That Saved Western Civilization From nationally syndicated radio host Buck Sexton, a new podcast that looks at the epic struggles that- had they gone the other way- could have extinguished the western world as we know it. From the Persians of Xerxes to the Janissaries of the Ottoman Sultan, on many occasions vast and powerful forces nearly conquered the Western world before it ever could be realized. It was only through the valiant last stands of armies led by champ ...
 
Akbar’s Chamber offers a non-political, non-sectarian and non-partisan space for exploring the past and present of Islam. It has no political or theological bias other than a commitment to the Socratic method (which is to say that questions lead us to understanding) and the empirical record (which is to say the evidence of the world around us). By these methods, Akbar’s Chamber is devoted to enriching public awareness of Islam and Muslims both past and present. The podcast aims to improve un ...
 
NEON is a different way of sharing historical knowledge. NEON takes a pop culture phenomenon and turns it on its head by revealing lesser known facts, real-life events and history behind your favourite Netflix shows, movies or video games. From how the A-Team took inspiration from Vietnamese history and resistance leaders, to the Aryan purity and Harem breeding programs behind the Handmaid’s Tale. Even some of the most successful video games – Assassins Creed, God of War, and Fortnite – are ...
 
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Acclaimed scholar and Jerusalemite Hillel Cohen shared with us the stories of his childhood in Jerusalem, how he became interested in the history of the city and particular in establishing a personal relation with the Palestinians of Jerusalem after 1967. This is the moment Hillel became also interested in Jewish-Arab relations, how they developed …
 
The first part of our first two parter sees us wandering around the English countryside once more. Stonehenge has intrigue, mystery and massive stones moved around without the invention of the wheel. For more info check out the English Heritage site. For all that good stuff head on over to destinationhistorypod.com Included links: Stone techniques …
 
(Lucy) How did Ivanhoe become a wildly popular school text? And what happened to the interpretation of the text when it did? Across the Anglophone world, Scott’s medieval England became reified as a time and place of chivalric adventure, despite the novel’s often ironic tone and often pointed social criticisms. This episode examines how Sir Walter …
 
The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion work…
 
A century ago, it was a given that a woman with a college degree had to choose between having a career and a family. Today, there are more female college graduates than ever before, and more women want to have a career and family, yet challenges persist at work and at home. This book traces how generations of women have responded to the problem of …
 
Marc Baer joins us for a fascinating jaunt through 300 years of imperial Ottoman history. But Marc's book, The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars and Caliphs, at our very own Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781473695702 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, join the fun on Patreon: https://www.patreon…
 
In the 1960s, the radical youth of Western Europe’s New Left rebelled against the democratic welfare state and their parents’ antiquated politics of reform. It was not the first time an upstart leftist movement was built on the ruins of the old. New Lefts: The Making of a Radical Tradition (Princeton University Press, 2021) traces the history of ne…
 
The image of the Ottoman Turks and their interaction with the Christian West, has undergone many changes in the past: from William Gladstone's famous comment that: “[The Turks] one and all, bag and baggage, shall, I hope, clear out from the province they have desolated and profaned.” To the more recent revisionist views of the 'cultural exchange' s…
 
Author Annie Garthwaite joins Charlotte and Boney to discuss the incredible Cecily Neville, mother of Edward IV and Richard III and the subject of her new novel, Cecily, which views the Wars of the Roses through the incredible woman history has pushed out of focus. Buy Cecily by Annie Garthwaite at our very own bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.or…
 
In this episode the co-editor of the Jerusalem Quarterly Alex Winder tells us about the history of this very important publication, a mix of essays and scholarly written articles about Jerusalem that cover various disciplines and historical periods. The conversation moved then to discuss police and policing in British Mandatory Jerusalem. With Alex…
 
Megan Kelleher joins us to talk about the work of the Commonwealth War Graves at home and how it has evolved in the last 100 years. Learn more about the work of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission at: https://www.cwgc.org/ Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, join the fun on Patreon: https://www.patreo…
 
Jonathan Clements returns for another rip-roaring jaunt through Asian history. This time it's the life and times of Kubilai Khan. Buy Jonathan's book, A Brief History of Khubilai Khan: Lord of Xanadu, Founder of the Yuan Dynasty, Emperor of China, at our very own Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781472143204 Like the episode? Send us …
 
When Google announced that it planned to digitize books to make the world's knowledge accessible to all, questions were raised about the roles and responsibilities of libraries, the rights of authors and publishers, and whether a powerful corporation should be the conveyor of such a fundamental public good. Along Came Google: A History of Library D…
 
Rosa was born in West Africa around 1720, but brought to Brazil in a slave ship when she was six years old. She lived as a slave and prostitute until her dedication to God and visions brought her to the attention of a local priest. Her freedom was purchased and she went on to write the first book ever written by a black Brazilian woman and found a …
 
Histories of the Vietnam War are not in short supply. In U.S. history, it ranks alongside the Civil War and World War Two in terms of author coverage. The aftermath of the war has received a similar amount of attention, with historians noting the effect that the end of the war had on domestic politics and U.S. foreign policy. But what about shifts …
 
Jalal Abukhater is a young Palestinian journalist, storyteller and runner, reporting from Jerusalem on life as witnessed and lived. With Jalal we talked about what it means to be a reporter from Jerusalem and how people from abroad see the city. Jalal remembers his time in Scotland and what it means to be a Jerusalemite abroad; from here we talked …
 
The Luftwaffe's actions in the air in the Second World War tend to occupy our memories, but they were very active on the ground and committed the same atrocities as the other arms of the Nazi war machine. In his new book, Birds of Prey, Dr Philip Blood analyses the efforts of a Luftwaffe ground unit that attempted to pacify a forest in East Prussia…
 
Do we really need universities and colleges anymore? Have they become too politicized? Many conservatives have started to write off American academia. They contend that it is so irremediably, irretrievably woke that the best that those on the right can hope for is to try to advance their ideas and live according to their principles outside it. Othe…
 
Julian Maxwell-Heath joins us to talk about the completely marginalised history of Stone Age Egypt and why there is lots of exciting history that predates the Pharaohs. Buy Julian's book, Before the Pharaohs: Exploring the Archaeology of Stone Age Egypt, at our very own Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781526790415 Like the episode? S…
 
The Ottoman onslaught against Constantinople is getting closer. Two new leaders emerge on either side. Constantine XI Palaiologos, the last Emperor of Byzantium, and the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II, better known as Mehmet the Conqueror. Both men will go down in history as great heroes - discover why in this podcast.…
 
(Lucy) There are some things that almost any Hollywood film set in the Middle Ages can count on. It will be set in England. There will be a lot of forests. The Norman nobility will oppress the Saxon peasantry. Other things are optional but frequent. There may be a tournament or a siege. There may be a reference to the Crusades. Robin Hood may turn …
 
In the twentieth century, the rise of science and secularism became major preoccupations for countless religious thinkers, Muslim or otherwise. Among them was Said Nursi, an influential Kurdish-Turkish thinker who grappled with such timeless questions as what is a human being, and what constitutes true knowledge? After living through the collapse o…
 
Matthew Lewis joins us to talk all about one of the power couples of medieval England, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Buy Matthew's book, Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine: Founding an Empire, at our very own Bookshop: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781445671567 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, j…
 
Kyle Harper's book Plagues upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History (Princeton UP, 2021) is a monumental history of humans and their germs. Weaving together a grand narrative of global history with insights from cutting-edge genetics, Kyle Harper explains why humanity’s uniquely dangerous disease pool is rooted deep in our evolutiona…
 
James Holland returns to History Hack to tell Ale and Boney all about his latest book, Brothers in Arms, which follows the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry from D-Day to Germany. It is a fascinating look at a single unit the in middle of it all and we, quite rightly, take credit for it. You can buy Brothers in Arms by James Holland at our very own Booksho…
 
Ian Keable joins us to talk all about his new book, which looks at some of the bonkers hoaxes of the eighteenth century. But Ian's book, The Century of Deception: The Birth of the Hoax in Eighteenth Century England, at our Bookshop here: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781908906441 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like…
 
In this honest and hard episode of Jerusalem Unplugged, Prof. Nazmi al-Jubeh takes us through his personal journey as a Jerusalemite born in the Old City in 1955. His experience is the same of many Palestinian Jerusalemites who struggle every day. The stories of Lifta, Sheik Jarrah and Silwan instead of being the background of his story, they becom…
 
At the heart of human intelligence rests a fundamental puzzle: How are we incredibly smart and stupid at the same time? No existing machine can match the power and flexibility of human perception, language, and reasoning. Yet, we routinely commit errors that reveal the failures of our thought processes. What Makes Us Smart: The Computational Logic …
 
Matthew Restall and Amara Solari join us to tell us why there is so much more to the Maya than predicting when the world will end... But Matthew and Amara's book, 2012 and the End of the World: The Western Roots of the Maya Apocalypse, at our very own Bookshop: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781442206090 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko…
 
In the fourteenth century, the growing power of the Ottoman Turks seemed unstoppable. But there was one man who checked it. This was Timur the Lame, or Tamerlane, as he was called in Europe. Of mixed Turkish and Mongol descent, he created a vast empire at the end of the fourteenth century that was modelled on the Mongol Empire of the legendary Geng…
 
Computational models of urbanism—smart cities that use data-driven planning and algorithmic administration—promise to deliver new urban efficiencies and conveniences. Yet these models limit our understanding of what we can know about a city. A City Is Not a Computer: Other Urban Intelligences (Princeton UP, 2021) reveals how cities encompass myriad…
 
Nature, it has been said, invites us to eat by appetite and rewards by flavor. But what exactly are flavors? Why are some so pleasing while others are not? Delicious is a supremely entertaining foray into the heart of such questions. With generous helpings of warmth and wit, Rob Dunn and Monica Sanchez offer bold new perspectives on why food is enj…
 
Award-winning novelist Andrew Greig joins us to discuss recreating sixteenth-century Edinburgh and writing fiction parallel with seismic history. Buy Andrew's book, Rose Nicolson, at our very own Bookshop: https://uk.bookshop.org/a/6252/9781784292980 Like the episode? Send us a tip! https://ko-fi.com/historyhack Like the podcast, join the fun on Pa…
 
When we think of the forces driving cancer, we don’t necessarily think of evolution. But evolution and cancer are closely linked because the historical processes that created life also created cancer. The Cheating Cell: How Evolution Helps Us Understand and Treat Cancer (Princeton UP, 2020) delves into this extraordinary relationship, and shows tha…
 
Falestin Naili, historian associated with the Institut français du Proche-Orient (Ifpo) in Amman, specializes in the social history of the late Ottoman and Mandate Palestine and Jordan and has focused much of her recent research on local governance and politics, particularly in Jerusalem. Through her interest in collective memory and oral history s…
 
The Luftwaffe's actions in the air in the Second World War tend to occupy our memories, but they were very active on the ground and committed the same atrocities as the other arms of the Nazi war machine. In his new book, Birds of Prey, Dr Philip Blood analyses the efforts of a Luftwaffe ground unit that attempted to pacify a forest in East Prussia…
 
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