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Southern Gothic

Southern Gothic Media

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Step into the world of the unknown and unravel the dark history, and infamous legends of the American South. Join us as we journey into the heart of this rich and fascinating region, uncovering its ghostly stories, haunted places, and eeriest tales through captivating storytelling, in-depth historical research, and an immersive audio soundscape. From the Bell Witch of Tennessee to the haunted Waverly Hills Sanatorium, the ghostly tales of the Myrtles Plantation, the Curse of Lake Lanier and ...
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Since its grand opening on May 1, 1905, the Seelbach Hotel has stood as one of Louisville, Kentucky's most lavish and luxurious establishments. It has hosted an array of notable figures, from U.S. Presidents and legendary actors to notorious bootleggers and mobsters. As a result, the hotel is steeped in lore, with some claiming it was here that F. …
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"The Witch of Pungo" Originally Aired in June 2022 On Wednesday, July 10, 1706, scores of people arrived at what is now known as Witch Duck Point on the Lynnhaven River in Virginia. They were there to witness a unique but brutal legal proceeding that would never again be carried out in the colony of Virginia– the trial of forty-six-year-old Grace S…
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Detective Louis N. Scarcella was a legendary figure in New York City during the '90s. In a city overrun with violent crime, he cracked the toughest cases and put away the worst criminals. But the story changed when a group of convicted murderers-turned-jailhouse lawyers made a startling discovery that linked all their cases: Scarcella was the cop w…
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On March 28, 1869, Knox Martin was hanged for murdering John and Elizabeth Wittenmeier in their Nashville home. Curiously, only several days prior, Martin had made a deal with local physicians to sell his body to them for experimenting following the execution-- experimentation that looked an awful lot like something out Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.…
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In 1891, miners in the Coal Creek Valley, the most lucrative mining region in the state of Tennessee, decided they were tired of being replaced by convict labor and were going to do something about it. So on the night of July 14th, 300 men, armed to the teeth, descended upon the stockade in Briceville where the convicts were housed, took control, a…
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The Banner Mine explosion of April 8, 1911, in Alabama claimed the lives of 128 men, predominantly African American prisoners leased to the Pratt Consolidated Coal Company by the state. This devastating event underscored the dire conditions of convict-lease labor, a system exploiting carefully tailored laws to target black men for profit-driven inc…
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In September 1962, Mr. and Mrs. Daughtery, an elderly couple residing in Portsmouth, Virginia, along with their great-great-grandson Cleveland Harmon, found themselves at the center of inexplicable occurrences. Within their home, objects began moving on their own, and furniture inexplicably flew about, leaving no rational explanation for the chaos.…
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At 1:20 pm on Saturday, July 19, 1970, a fire broke out in an abandoned home in Hadsboro, Mississippi, that was well known throughout the community as haunted. But what made the incident so unbelievable wasn't necessarily the claim of spirits there, but rather the fact a psychic had foretold of the Cahill House's fiery demise less than a year prior…
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Historical Blindness is a podcast about history’s myths, mysteries, and misconceptions. By examining cases of outrageous hoaxes, pernicious conspiracy theory, mass delusion, baffling mysteries and unreliable historiography, host Nathaniel Lloyd searches for insights into modern religious belief and political culture. Learn more about your ad choice…
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On Tuesday, September 8, 1987, 77-year-old Minnie Clyde Winston stepped out of her bathtub onto the tile floor and felt something sticky under her foot. Holding a towel, she looked down and discovered she was standing in a small puddle of red liquid—a substance that would later be identified as human blood. But if that wasn't alarming enough, Minni…
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“Blood Seeped Under the Door, Down the Steps, and into the Street…” On the corner of Orleans Avenue and Dauphine Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans is a stately three-and-a-half-story mansion that is said to be the site of a massacre so significant that blood flowed from the building and into the street. It is the tale of a mysterious Turk…
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For almost a century, folks who dare head out to the old L&N train tracks at night, on the edge of the small town of Chapel Hill, Tennessee, have found themselves face-to-face with a strange ball of light that eerily bounces down the line. Some say the light is the spirit of a headless railroad worker, others a murdered woman, but no matter what ha…
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In our recent episode Mamie Thurman's Lingering Spirit, we explored the unsolved murder of a woman whose spirit purportedly haunts 22 Mine Road, just outside of Logan, West Virginia; however, there is one mystery that we didn't discuss-- the place where Mamie Thurman was buried. So this week's minisode does exactly that. Want to Listen to Southern …
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Head southwest out of Logan, West Virginia and you’ll end up on an isolated strip of road up in the Appalachian Mountains where folks claim the spirit of a lady in white has been hitchhiking with coal drivers for almost a century. The tale isn’t that much different than others seen in ghost stories all over the world, but here on 22 Mine Road, folk…
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Admit it: you’re obsessed with royal families – watching them, gossiping about them, wanting to be them. It’s the stuff of fantasy. But for real-life royals, the crown jewels can be more like shiny handcuffs. There are expectations and rules – and if you break them, the consequences are big and very public. And there are royal families and wild roy…
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In 1816 a mysterious couple arrived in Alexandria, Virginia and isolated themselves in Room Number 8 at the now historic Gadsby’s Tavern. Unfortunately, the young woman was deathly ill and despite receiving assistance from a local doctor, she passed away. After burying his supposed wife, the man then disappeared, but the headstone he purchased for …
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Theodosia Burr Alston was a pioneer for early American women and was celebrated for her education and intellectual achievements, but to this day many remember her for her mysterious disappearance. On December 31, 1812, the daughter of notorious politician Aaron Burr, boarded a schooner headed for New York, but the ship never arrived. Key Highlights…
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Constructed between 1858 and 1881, the Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum was initially a symbol of progressive treatment for the mentally ill, based on the philosophy and designs of Thomas Story Kirkbride. With an emphasis on therapeutic sunlight, fresh air, and humane treatment, it promised a new dawn in psychiatric care; however, as decades passed, …
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When a charismatic young doctor announces revolutionary treatments for cancer and HIV, patients from around the world turn to him for their last chance. As medical experts praise Serhat Gumrukcu’s genius, the company he co-founded rockets in value to over half a billion dollars. But when a team of researchers makes a startling discovery, they begin…
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In 1871, Clara Robertson’s life was forever altered by an encounter with a ghost. The blonde-haired, blue-eyed girl witnessed a haunting vision of a transparent, emaciated young girl in a tattered pink dress while practicing piano upstairs at the Brinkley Female College in Memphis, Tennessee. The sensational series of events that followed was widel…
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Andersonville Prison, officially known as Camp Sumter, was a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the American Civil War, operating from February 1864 to April 1865 near Andersonville, Georgia. Notorious for its horrific conditions and high mortality rate, it was designed for 10,000 prisoners but held over 32,000 at its peak, leading to severe o…
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The legend of Julia Legare has been passed down for generations, likely due to the fact that it brings into focus a far-reaching human anxiety, the fear of being buried alive. In 1852, while visiting her relatives at their home in Ediso Island, South Carolina, 22-year-old Julia Legare fell ill. Her diagnosis was not good, Julia had been struck with…
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Happy Holidays Y'all! In honor of Christmas, we're bringing you a couple of old, spooky Victorian tales courtesy of our friend Amanda Woomer's book A Very Frightful Victorian Christmas: Twelve Ghost Stories, Six Victorian Recipes. Want to hear Brandon read more of these tales? Join us over on Patreon to view a reading of all twelve of these Very Fr…
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The North Island Lighthouse sits just across Winyah Bay from Georgetown, South Carolina. For over two hundred years it guided ships safely into port, but according to local lore the apparition of one of the old lighthouse keeper's daughters has been said to appear to sailors to warn them of impending storms. Help Southern Gothic grow by becoming a …
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