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Best USC Bedrosian Center podcasts we could find (updated December 2019)
Best USC Bedrosian Center podcasts we could find
Updated December 2019
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An audio book club. Our geeks read and discuss new and classic works in the policy field – fictional and non. Social justice, tech, politics, policy … we cover it all and more. Let's think about what is at the heart of being a citizen in America. This book club helps us get at the heart of what it means to be a citizen in a democracy. Sponsored by the USC Bedrosian Center http://bedrosian.usc.edu/ Recorded at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy http://priceschool.usc.edu
 
P.S. You’re Interesting is a series of conversations on political science research hosted by Jeffery A. Jenkins. Formerly, “Our American Discourse,” we continue the series to pick up the tradition Anthony W. Orlando began. We hope to keep conversations … discourse alive. To keep thinking about the research we do in the academy, why it matters to us, and hopefully to you. Sponsored by the USC Bedrosian Center http://bedrosian.usc.edu/ Recorded at the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy http ...
 
In this series, we’ll be discussing the way art, theater in particular, is an integral part of our civic lives, allowing us to question and inform our conceptions of citizenship and community. We will discuss various theatrical productions, both at the USC School of Dramatic Arts and in theaters in Los Angeles. We think about what the plays / productions / performances are saying about our society & culture.
 
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An interview with author of Children of the Dream: Why School Integration Works, Rucker C. Johnson. (Follow Rucker on Twitter: @ProfRucker) Rucker stopped by USC for a conversation with the Gary Painter, Director of the Sol Price Center for Social Innovation. While on campus, Rucker was also gracious enough to spend some time with our Executive ...…
 
In today’s episode we’re thinking about the patriarchy, and Mona Eltahawy’s tools for women and girls. Tools to take down the premise by which prevents so many women from living full human lives. The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls is a memoir, a manifesto, and a toolkit for women to retrain themselves to take up space in the world. To ...…
 
For today's episode, we're thinking about the many books we've discussed over the years. After 70+ book discussions, we thought it was about time we did a look back at our favorite discussions, the surprises, the let downs, and what we hope for the future. @drschweitzer, @AubreyHi, @BedrosianCenter Read along with us! Next month we're reading T ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Seth Hill, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science UCSD. Hill studies how citizens motivate politician behavior. They discuss representation, elections, and some extras just for you! Email: bedrosian.center@usc.edu Twitter: @BedrosianCenter…
 
Host Lisa Schweitzer is joined by Aubrey L. Hicks, Susan Lindau, and Joan Miller to discuss Victor LaValle's The Devil in Silver. Pepper is a big man. He's accused of a crime that he doesn't see himself in. He's dropped suddenly, into a budget-strapped mental institution in Queens, New York called New Hyde. He's not mentally ill, but that doesn ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Leah Stokes. Stokes, a public scholar, is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and affiliated with the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and the Environmental Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Barba ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Danielle Thomsen, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC Irvine. Her research in American Politics primarily falls into looking at Congress, parties, and gender & politics. They discuss why pipelines to primaries (and then to elected office) matter so much in ...…
 
Another bonus episode! Host Lisa discusses Professor Liz Falletta's book, By-Right, By-Design: Housing Development Versus Housing Design in Los Angeles. Falletta looks to help practitioners move beyond housing production as a zero sum game towards the more polyvalent solutions that will be required as LA densifies. Read along with us! We're rea ...…
 
The Undercommons is a series of essays exploring contemporary political thought from an inside/outside the commons perspective. Our guest today contends that under all the theory, the book is about friendship and the many ways in which friendship and conversation can be study. That study is love. Exploring issues of race, politics, the universi ...…
 
You've heard that gerrymandering can be bad for representation. Jonathan A. Rodden wants to take you further back in time to the beginnings of what has become a problem of representation, to the time that the Democrats were aligning with labor and Republicans were moving further from urban spaces. Today in certain states, the historic shift sti ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with a Bedrosian Faculty Affiliate, Abby K. Wood. Wood is Associate Professor of Law, Political Science and Public Policy. When she first started her career she noticed that program evaluation wasn't as robust as it could be, so she wanted to learn causal inference in orde ...…
 
Today's book: The Line Becomes a River by Francisco Cantú. The southern border between Mexico and the U.S. can be a violent place. Yet isn't as easily defined as it seems.There are places where the border is permeable, invisible. The border is a construct, and the racialized rhetoric of The Border combined with two decades of militarization hav ...…
 
What is a summer book club without a good detective novel? Our conversation today dives into Robert Galbraith's third installment of the Cormoran Strike novels, Career of Evil. Today's host is convinced that Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling) might have the best descriptions of the complexity of London since Dickens! Host Richard Green is joined by L ...…
 
If models of the world are all wrong, why are they critical to understanding our complex world? Today, host Pamela Clouser McCann discusses the book The Model Thinker with guests Jeffery A. Jenkins and James Lo. For links to some of the things we discuss, check out the showpage! Join the conversation about each episode on Twitter, Facebook, or ...…
 
Can the way a person plays golf really explain their whole personality? Famed golf writer Rick Reilly aims to make the case in Commander in Cheat. Detailing with excruciating detail and humor the myriad of ways President Trump cheats in the golf world. Does Reilly make the case for using golf as a metaphor for President Trump's governance? List ...…
 
Layli Long Soldier is the author of our book for June 2019, Whereas, winner of the National Book Critics Circle award, and finalist for the National Book Award. She is a citizen of the Oglala Lakota Nation and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Whereas in response to an "apology" to Native Americans which was buried in a department of defense appro ...…
 
In today's episode, we discuss Nnedi Okorafor's Afrofuturist novel Who Fears Death. A young woman, named Onyesonwu meaning Who Fears Death learns she is a child of rape, deals with being an outcast, and after a trauma finds out she has special powers. She learns she is at the center of a prophecy that could change the world. We discuss some the ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks with Pamela Ban, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego. Ban discusses her recent research. First, she looks at how policy outcomes might change as Congress has a bit more gender representations. Then they discuss the revolving door and lobbying - how the ...…
 
Host Aubrey Hicks is joined by professors Chris Redfearn and Liz Falletta in a discussion of the New York Times bestselling book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo. On today's podcast, we talk about how white fragility works to sustain and reproduce the racist institutions & socialization which we all inherited. Scheduling in the Spring semester ...…
 
In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins's guest is Elisabeth R. Gerber, Associate Dean for Research and Policy Engagement; Jack L. Walker, Jr. Collegiate Professor of Public Policy (UMich). They discuss the move from Political Science departments to public policy departments - how the focus has moved from theory devel ...…
 
State of Resistance: What California's Dizzying Descent and Remarkable Resurgence Mean for America's Future by Manuel Pastor Another bonus episode! Host Lisa discusses Professor Manuel Pastor's latest book, State of Resistance. The book looks at the last several decades of economic, social, and environmental transformations in California. Pasto ...…
 
An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon This month, host Lisa is joined by David Sloane, Denise McIver, and Aubrey Hicks to discuss An Unkindness of Ghosts, the science fiction novel about a young neuroatypical woman on a generation ship in search of the "promised land" looking for evidence her mother had discovered something important about ...…
 
Body Horror: Capitalism, Fear, Misogyny, Jokes by Anne Elizabeth Moore This month, Lisa is joined by Marisa Turesky, Chris Redfearn, and Aubrey Hicks to discuss Body Horror, a book of essays on the interaction between the abnormal, frail, resilient, squishy bodies of women and the world, from journalist Anne Elizabeth Moore. Warnings: spoilers, ...…
 
When do leaders pay penalties for backing down on promises? In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins's guest is Philip Potter, Associate Professor of Politics (UVA), and the Founding Director of the National Security Policy Center. Potter's work looks at how public opinion effects foreign policy, when do policymakers h ...…
 
National Party Committees and Political Power In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and political Boris Heersink, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Fordham University, look at the national party committees. What kind of power do the national committees have? What is the role of the commit ...…
 
by Sophocles, Paul Woodruff (Translator) This month, Lisa is joined by Carla Della Gatta and Richard Green to discuss the timeless play by Sophocles: Antigone. The play has clear connections to political struggles we face thousands of years later. The struggle between law and norm, the struggle to define what the state can control, and more. Li ...…
 
Using the case of Thames Town, an English-like village in Shanghai, The Real Fake looks at Chinese ideas of spacial construction and what authenticity means in (re)making spaces. In today's episode, host Lisa Schweitzer talks with the author of the new book The Real Fake: Authenticity and the Production of Space, Maria Francesca Piazzoni. Read ...…
 
This month, Lisa is joined by Anthony Orlando, Jeff Jenkins, and Christian Grose to discuss Bob Woodward's latest reportage on the Presidency: Fear. How does this stack up to other Woodward titles and how does the principal-agent theory work it's way into conversation with these political junkies? For links to some of the things we discus, chec ...…
 
Democracy & Inequality of Political Influence In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks economic and political inequality in democracies with Martin Gilens, Professor of Public Policy at UCLA Luskin. The degree of political influence is dramatically unequal for people within the United States, public policy can he ...…
 
One of the larger problems for government, is that taking risks is difficult. Risks are expensive, and can lead to a host of problems when those risks don't give desired results. Here's where social innovation is taking a chance. In the UK you have pay for results programs, called pay for success here in the states. How do these programs work? ...…
 
PS You’re Busted: How bridging silos in research & practice can impact human trafficking irl In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins talks about human trafficking with Greg DeAngelo, Associate Professor of Economic Studies at Claremont Graduate University. How does an economist get data on human trafficking, and other ...…
 
This month, Lisa, Richard, and Aubrey discuss the new book of sonnets from Terrance Hayes, American Sonnets for my Past and Future Assassin. Hayes' sonnets are "acrid with tear gas, and they unravel with desire." For the poetry doubters everywhere. Read along for next month : Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward You can email us at be ...…
 
America, Heck Yeah! Public Schools & Baseball In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and D. Roderick (Rod) Kiewiet, Professor of Political Science at Caltech, break down the long standing myth of the equalizing force of public education. We hold the idea that public schools present Americans with equal opportunity. K ...…
 
This month, Aubrey, Ange-Marie, Jeff, and David discuss the new book from renowned literary critic Michiko Kakutani, The Death of Truth : Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump. Or, perhaps ... death by a thousand "realities." Read along for next month : Fear: Trump in the White House by Bob Woodward Find what we're reading and more on the show ...…
 
Our new tradition, on the Bedrosian Bookclub, is to read a witchy book for the month of October. This year ... We're taking a look at the coming of age novel, Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya. This is the story of Antonio Marez, a six year old boy caught between his Father's love of travel, his mother's desire he become a priest, the town (mod ...…
 
Social Network Roles in Foreign Capital and Research In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and Benjamin A. T. Graham, assistant professor in the School of International Relations at USC, discuss the role that migrants can play in bringing foreign capital into countries. He uses case studies from the Philippines and ...…
 
Political Influence of Public Protest In this episode of the PS You’re Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and LaGina Gause, Assistant Professor of Political Science at UC San Diego, discuss the pro-democracy (small d) results of her study on legislative responsiveness to collective action by marginalized groups. Her findings seem counterintuitiv ...…
 
What is authenticity in a community? What is an authentic community? In a world which never stops changing, growing, evolving ... how can planners take up the challenge of authenticity? Host Lisa Schweitzer talks with editors Brettany Shannon and Laura Tate of the new book Planning for AuthentiCITIES about the challenge and how to move toward i ...…
 
Creativity, Energy, and Experimentation In this episode of the P.S. You're Interesting podcast, Jeff Jenkins and Benjamin Newman, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the UC Riverside, discuss creativity and experimentation in political science. As a young scholar, Ben was interested in figuring out why people have the ...…
 
Using contemporary examples, Kate Manne's Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny, explores the definitions of misogyny and its contrast with sexism. The book is a philosophical examination of misogyny as the policing of the patriarchal state, serving to punish women who might step out of the assigned giver role. An important read, it is also not a bo ...…
 
A quick update from our Producers: We will use this feed, for the Our American Discourse podcast, to bring you a new series of conversations. We will change the title to PS You’re Interesting. PS will be a series of conversations on new and novel research in political science. We’re conceiving this as a way to keep Anthony’s amazing work alive, ...…
 
In 2017 two lectures presented in the London Review of Books’ Winter Lecture series were published together in Mary Beard’s Women & Power. The first lecture put into context the idea and resonance of women’s public voice, with the second lecture focusing on power. Host Lisa Schweitzer, joined by Aubrey L. Hicks and Pamela Clouser McCann discuss ...…
 
Eva Dolan's This Is How It Ends is a thriller set in an anti-gentrification activist community in the middle of a rapidly gentrifying London. Dolan tackles the huge issue of gentrification through the story of two women engaged in the anti-gentrification movement. How do we define ourselves in places? How do we protect the self in social media, ...…
 
Though we are sad to bid farewell to “Our American Discourse,” we welcome the opportunity to talk about farewells—indeed, the hardest farewells of all: those that happen after death. How do we say goodbye to the past? And what does our farewell mean for the lives gone before us and for the future that will come after them? It is time to break t ...…
 
If the old saying is true that “life is a journey, not a destination,” then it stands to reason that the way we travel matters a great deal. In fact, that’s what the latest evidence has shown: Transportation choices and systems play a crucial role in our economy and our environment. You may think that your car or bike or walk or train ride is o ...…
 
Anyone who reads or watches the news might feel like we are in a news assault. The news happens so fast, technology helps us disseminate and consume with speed, and media outlets are in a relatively new competition: a competition for relevancy. As “papers of record” are being attacked as “fake,” the question of how to communicate with fairness ...…
 
Power is up for grabs in Washington. A controversial President, an unpopular Congress, and a midterm election all make 2018 a battleground for political control. Who will win? How will they do it? And what role do you play? This is story of the most consequential game ever played, and it’s told by one of the leading Congressional experts of our ...…
 
Think of all the public policy problems that the government hasn’t been able to solve. Now imagine that you had a solution for one of them. The government should be interested, right? If your solution really works, they should want to invest in it. They should want to encourage you to make it happen, perhaps monetarily if possible. Well, until ...…
 
Congressional historian Sarah Binder joins neighbor and investment manager, Mark Spindel in a look at the history of the relationship between the Federal Reserve and its legislative parent, Congress. The result is the Princeton University Press book The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve. Central to the book is the n ...…
 
We’re six months away from one of the most consequential midterm elections in modern history, and Americans are fed up with Congress. Politicians have gotten a bad rap throughout history, but today’s legislators are setting record lows in approval ratings and public trust. What gives? Why do they disappoint us so often? Are they really ignoring ...…
 
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