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Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
These Anthropology podcasts cover everything from geology, biodiversity, uncommon knowledge about humans, culture, history, humanity’s potential and more ⁠— so explore these podcasts at your own leisure and you won’t be disappointed!
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The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspe ...
 
A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
An original podcast brought to you by the graduate students of the Department of Anthropology at The Ohio State University. Join us once as we explore the human experience! We are now a part of the Anthropology Public Outreach Program at The Ohio State University. Follow us @ohiostateAPOP
 
Hi, I’m Dax Shepard, and I love talking to people. I am endlessly fascinated by the messiness of being human, and I find people who are vulnerable and honest about their struggles and shortcomings to be incredibly sexy. I invite you to join me as I explore other people’s stories. We will celebrate, above all, the challenges and setbacks that ultimately lead to growth and betterment. What qualifies me for such an endeavor? More than a decade of sobriety, a degree in Anthropology and four year ...
 
Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of the journal American Anthropologist. Building on the journal’s commitment to four-field, multimodal research, we host conversations about anthropological projects, from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates. We aim to ask a series of fundamental questions about past, present, and future disciplinary practice, and to learn from those who chart new paths for a more broadly engaged anthropology.
 
Online Gods is a monthly podcast on digital cultures and their political ramifications, featuring lively conversations with scholars and activists. Presented by anthropologist Ian M. Cook, the podcast is a key initiative of the five year ERC project ONLINERPOL www.fordigitaldignity.com led by media anthropologist Sahana Udupa at LMU Munich, and cohosted by HAU Network for Ethnographic Theory. Online Gods represents our collective commitment to multimedia diffusion of research in accessible a ...
 
Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
What makes you … you? Is it your DNA, culture, environment? SAPIENS hosts Jen Shannon, Esteban Gómez, and SAPIENS.org Editor-in-Chief Chip Colwell speak with anthropologists from around the globe to help us uncover what makes us human. Subscribe now to learn more. The SAPIENS podcast is supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and produced by House of Pod.
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
The British Academy is the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences. We mobilise these disciplines to understand the world and shape a brighter future. ​ From artificial intelligence to climate change, from building prosperity to improving well-being – today’s complex challenges can only be resolved by deepening our insight into people, cultures and societies.​ We invest in researchers and projects across the UK and overseas, ​engage the public with fresh thinking and deb ...
 
Lore and Legends explores humanities past, present, and future through the lense of the lore and legends built up by dominant cultures like Ancient Egypt, Greece, and more forgotten or ignored groups like the Native Americans or Tribal Africans, as well as modern myths, legends, and phenomena from bigfoot, to UFO's, psychic powers and even religions.... https://www.loreandlegends.net
 
How does work culture shape human behavior and experience? How do humans create cultures? From uncomfortable truths to heart-to-heart conversations, Culture First uncovers what it really takes to build a better world of work. We all aspire to rise above the day-to-day commotion and bring more humanity into our work lives. Our host Damon Klotz is dedicated to understanding how we find meaning in our work and how to better the experience humans have within organizations. Join him as he explore ...
 
What makes you … you? Is it your DNA, culture, environment? SAPIENS hosts Jen Shannon, Esteban Gómez, and SAPIENS.org Editor-in-Chief Chip Colwell speak with anthropologists from around the globe to help us uncover what makes us human. Subscribe now to learn more. The SAPIENS podcast is supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation and produced by House of Pod.
 
Tired of entrenched view tribalism and binary debates? A psychologist, a philosopher, and an anthropologist walk into a podcast to air out some echo chambers, and try and a fresh perspective on the most controversial political, social and psychological debates. It's not about Left vs. Right, Us Vs. Them or Good vs. Evil. It's all about dialogue and beyond binary thinking!
 
How is it that two opposites can share the same brain? Pete, from Melbourne, Australia, Jen, from New York City, USA. Pete, at 6”7’, Jen, at 5”1”. Pete, the human periscope, Jen, the human stethoscope. Pete, the millennial, Jen, the Gen-X. Pete, at inbox zero, Jen, at inbox chaos. Pete, who wears jumpers, Jen, who wears sweaters. The Long and The Short Of It is a product of these differences. It’s a weekly podcast for curious folks ready to explore the art and science of being human from eve ...
 
#zimlove is a podcast where I, a foreigner who has been living and working in Zimbabwe for a couple years, tries to explain through the eyes of others, why I fell in love with this country. When I try to describe the beauty and diversity of this place, I fail because I cannot compete with hyperinflation and expensive safaris, which is the only thing that google spits out once you type in "Zimbabwe". In this podcast each person describes one true perspective on Zimbabwe from their own reality ...
 
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show series
 
Luis Gallegos, an Assistant Principal at Alliance Ouchi, a high school in Los Angeles, joins Darien on today's show! Luis is a public school educator and has served in schools throughout New England and Los Angeles, CA. As a queer, Latinx school leader, he works from a social justice lens with the goal of empowering students to dismantle systems of…
 
For six years, anthropologist and artist Maya Stovall enacted a series of dance performances outside of liquor stores in the McDougall-Hunt neighborhood on Detroit’s east side. Stovall conceptualized these performances as prompts for people that may pass by and as a means to open up space for conversation with Detroit residents. These filmed perfor…
 
On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration, hundreds of cities in the U.S. and across the globe organized Women’s Marches in response to Trump’s misogynistic comments and as a general rebuke of his election. In this collection edited by Dr. Rachelle (Riki) Salzman, established and emerging scholars contribute essays…
 
Justin Timberlake (Palmer, Trolls, The Social Network) is a 10x Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter, a 3x Emmy award-winning actor and record producer. Justin joins the Armchair Expert to discuss masculinity, the similarities of growing up in Memphis to Detroit, and the challenges of raising sons. Dax & Justin recount Justin’s experience on Punk…
 
Nuclear Energy is deeply misunderstood, shrouded in technical jargon, and all the secrecy you'd expect from Cold War weapon technology. Uncertainty breeds misinformation, and so we were blessed to have Sean Kenny, an expert guest on the next generation of nuclear molten salt reactors. An enlightening and intriguing conversation was had on the risks…
 
Reforms in Myanmar (formerly Burma) have eased restrictions on citizens' political activities. Yet for most Burmese, Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung shows in Everyday Economic Survival in Myanmar (U Wisconsin Press, 2019), eking out a living from day to day leaves little time for civic engagement. Citizens have coped with extreme hardship through great re…
 
Acts of Repair: Justice, Truth, and the Politics of Memory in Argentina (Rutgers UP, 2020) explores how ordinary people grapple with political violence in Argentina, a nation home to survivors of multiple genocides and periods of violence, including the Holocaust, the political repression of the 1976-1983 dictatorship, and the 1994 AMIA bombing. De…
 
As well as presenting practical challenges, addressing the question ‘what is it like in North Korea?’ raises ethical concerns around who is entitled to interpret life in a place so often discussed in luridly exoticizing terms. The awareness of authorial position and sensitivity to shared humanity which runs through Andray Abrahamian’s Being in Nort…
 
In the space of a few weeks this spring, organizations around the world learned that many traditional, in-person jobs could, in fact, be performed remotely. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, however, some individuals were already utilizing new options for personal mobility and online work to strike out on their own. In the new book, Digital Nomads: In …
 
Jamil Zaki (The War for Kindness) is a professor of psychology at Stanford University and the director of the Stanford Social Neuroscience Lab. Jamil joins the Armchair Expert to discuss all things empathy: why he was drawn to the topic, the roadblocks of it, the erosion of empathy and how to get it back. He explains the different types of empathy …
 
What does it mean to connect as a people through mass media? This book approaches that question by exploring how Moroccans engage communicative failure as they seek to shape social and political relations in urban Fez. Over the last decade, laments of language and media failure in Fez have focused not just on social relations that used to be and ha…
 
Many of the millions of workers streaming in from rural China to jobs at urban factories soon find themselves in new kinds of poverty and oppression. Yet, their individual experiences are far more nuanced than popular narratives might suggest. Rural Origins, City Lives: Class and Place in Contemporary China (U Washington Press, 2016) probes long-he…
 
In January 2021 armed rioters stormed the US Capitol in a harrowing and politically fomented insurrection. It was an apex of years of divisive and condemnable rhetoric and fear-mongering used to stoke insecurities and desperate action. How do we ensure this never happens again? Or how do we dismantle the social structures that feed hate, fear, and …
 
This week, Pete and Jen dissect and discuss their favorite moments of last week's interview with Seth Godin. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: What content was really sticky for Pete and Jen from last week's episode? How might we listen to and learn from changemakers and leaders we admire? What lessons and learnings might be ga…
 
Since the turn of the millennium, American Evangelical Protestantism has seen a swell of interest in Calvinist theology. Variously described as the New Calvinism or Neo-Reformed Christianity, the latter half of the first decade saw a resurgence of Reformed theology, especially among younger Evangelicals. Brad Vermurlen presents an insightful sociol…
 
In The Other End of the Needle (Rutgers University Press, 2020), David C. Lane, Ph.D. investigates the intricacies of the tattoo industry. Particularly, Lane found that tattooing is more complex than simply the tattoos that people wear. Using qualitative data and an accessible writing style, Lane explains the complexity of tattoo work as a type of …
 
Welcome to Race to 270– Armchair Expert’s first game show! Two competitors, Best friend Aaron Weakley and Perfect 10 Charlie, are on a race to see who can reach 270 pounds first. Aaron starts out the competition at 306 pounds and has 36 pounds to lose. Charlie starts at 230 pounds and has 40 pounds to gain. The winner will receive $5,000! Dax and M…
 
Today Darien catches up with R. Shawn Abrahams, a genderqueer black scientist practicing ascent with modification. They study phylogenomics, evolution, and super powers! This conversation about evolution, food politics, extinction and the Anthropocene is a wonderful demonstration of the fact that understanding risk involves appreciating the deep in…
 
Common (Mind Power Mixtape, A Beautiful Revolution Pt 1, Hell on Wheels) is a rapper, actor, and writer. Common joins the Armchair Expert to discuss learning to love process, the value of character, and having gratitude for the moment. Common explains how he found strength in individualism and how grateful he is to finally be able to do the things …
 
The Chinese, and their apologists point to how relatively peaceful China's modern expansion has been in comparison with the Western Superpowers. Activists from Hong Kong to the Uyghurs beg to differ. The Belt and Road Initiative, the Silk Road 2.0, worldwide trade deals, and buying up of foreign debt in return for massive construction partnerships …
 
Cambodia’s troubled history has often been depicted in terms of conflict, trauma and tussles between great powers. In Disturbed Forests, Fragmented Memories: Jarai and Other Lives in the Cambodian Highlands (U Washington Press, 2020), Jonathan Padwe assembles this history from narrative pieces by and of the Jarai, an ethnic minority living in the c…
 
In Creativity in Tokyo: Revitalizing a Mature City (Palgrave, 2020), Heide Imai and Matjaz Ursic focues on overlooked contextual factors that constitute the urban creative climate or innovative urban milieu in contemporary cities. Filled with reflections based on interviews with a diverse range of creative actors in various local neighborhoods in T…
 
Brad Grossman is an author, entrepreneur, and creator of the Zeitguide’s Culture Class. Brad joins the Armchair Expert to discuss his role as a culture guide and how he seeks out all the interesting information in the world and synthesizes it for his students. Brad explains the inspiring ways companies and individuals are pivoting in order to conne…
 
Intertwining autobiography and ethnography, Clara Han’s touching new book Seeing Like a Child: Inheriting the Korean War (Fordham University Press, 2020) asks how scholarship can be transformed from a child’s perspective. Through a critique of anthropological practices that assume fully formed “I” in its emphasis on self-reflexivity as well as the …
 
In an exciting expansion for The Long and The Short of It, Pete and Jen host their first-ever guest, Seth Godin, and noodle with him on his new book, The Practice. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete and Seth talk about: In what ways do practices show up in Seth's life? What are the differences between freelancers and entrepreneurs? How do i…
 
This week Darien sits down with Dr Fayola Jacobs, assistant professor at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. The conversation focuses on the black feminist lens that Dr Jacobs brings to the topics of disaster planning, environmental justice and urban planning. Follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook @Disasters…
 
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Barbara Dennis of Indiana University on her new ethnography, Walking with Strangers: Critical Ethnography and Educational Promise, published in 2020 by Peter Lang Press. Walking with Strangers: Critical Ethnography and Educational Promise features the IU-Unityville Outreach Project and tells the story of a 4-year-l…
 
How has the Syrian regime been able to bear the brunt of the challenges raised against it? And, what can we learn about the seductions of authoritarian politics more generally from the study of Syria? These questions animate Lisa Wedeen’s Authoritarian Apprehensions: Ideology, Judgment, and Mourning in Syria (University of Chicago Press, 2019). Her…
 
In this episode, I speak with Dr. Barbara Dennis of Indiana University on her new ethnography, Walking with Strangers: Critical Ethnography and Educational Promise, published in 2020 by Peter Lang Press. Walking with Strangers: Critical Ethnography and Educational Promise features the IU-Unityville Outreach Project and tells the story of a 4-year-l…
 
Randy Jackson (Name that Tune, American Idol) is a world-renowned musician, record producer, A&R executive, and founder of Unify Health Labs. Randy joins the Armchair Expert to discuss being a child in the deep south in the 60s, how he got started playing music, and his desire to live his life through music. He discusses his journey as a studio mus…
 
Say What Your Longing Heart Desires: Women, Prayer & Poetry in Iran (Stanford University Press, 2020) by Niloofar Haeri is a stunning and absorbing ethnography of the lived ritual experiences of contemporary Iranian women. The place of Persian poetry, especially in the tradition of erfan or mysticism, is central to many features of Iranian life, be…
 
With its infamously packed cars and disciplined commuters, Tokyo’s commuter train network is one of the most complex technical infrastructures on Earth. In An Anthropology of the Machine: Tokyo's Commuter Train Network (University of Chicago Press, 2018), Michael Fisch provides a nuanced perspective on how Tokyo’s commuter train network embodies th…
 
Heroin first reached Gejiu, a Chinese city in southern Yunnan known as Tin Capital, in the 1980s. Widespread use of the drug, which for a short period became “easier to buy than vegetables,” coincided with radical changes in the local economy caused by the marketization of the mining industry. More than two decades later, both the heroin epidemic a…
 
How do songwriters, worship leaders, and music industry professionals collaborate to make music that can become prayer? Ari Y. Kelman explores this question in his excellent study, Shout to the Lord: Making Worship Music in Evangelical America (New York University Press, 2018). Presenting years of research through fieldwork, case studies, and inter…
 
Immigrant Japan? Sounds like a contradiction, but as Gracia Liu-Farrer shows in Immigrant Japan Mobility and Belonging in an Ethno-nationalist Society (Cornell University Press, 2020), millions of immigrants make their lives in Japan, dealing with the tensions between belonging and not belonging in this ethno-nationalist country. Why do people want…
 
Dr. Sanjay Gupta is the first three-peat Armchair Expert guest and an American neurosurgeon, medical reporter, CNN medical correspondent, and author. Sanjay, fresh off receiving his covid-19 vaccination, joins the Armchair Expert to discuss how much we’ve learned this year about human behavior. Sanjay explains the evolution of neurogenesis and why …
 
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth are disproportionately represented in the U.S. youth homelessness population. In Coming Out to the Streets, Brandon Andrew Robinson examines their lives. Based on interviews and ethnographic fieldwork in central Texas, Coming Out to the Streets looks into the LGBTQ youth's lives before th…
 
Jen and Pete discuss their processes for reflecting on the previous year, and looking to the year ahead. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: What are some different ways of reflecting on 2020? Is looking at 2020 even a worthwhile endeavor? What words and mantras are Pete and Jen going in to 2021 with? To hear all Episodes and rea…
 
In Black Lives and Spatial Matters: Policing Blackness and Practicing Freedom in Suburban St. Louis (Cornell University Press, 2020), Dr. Jodi Rios examines relationships between blackness, space, and racism, in the northern suburbs of St. Louis. She argues that the “double bind of living as Black in North St. Louis County means that Black resident…
 
Today I interview Tanya Luhrmann about her new book, How God Becomes Real: Kindling the Presence of Invisible Others (Princeton University Press, 2020). Luhrmann is the Watkins University Professor at Stanford University, where she teaches psychology and anthropology. And her work is fascinating. She’s interested in what seems like an impossible qu…
 
Baseball has been Japan's most popular sport for over a century. In The Sportsworld of the Hanshin Tigers: Professional Baseball in Modern Japan (University of California Press, 2018), anthropologist William Kelly analyzes Japanese baseball ethnographically by focusing on a single professional team, the Hanshin Tigers. For over fifty years, the Tig…
 
Welcome back for Season 4!!! As always, thanks for joining us once more - or for the first time - as we explore why disasters really happen. This season Jason and Ksenia are joined by a new co-host, Darien Alexander WIlliams! Today we give some context to the new season, discuss the key themes that emerged and reflect on why we have encouraged the …
 
Today we speak with Javier Auyero, Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, about his 25 years of experience studying marginalized communities in Buenos Aires ethnographically. Javier tells us how he first came to sociology, and the intellectual curiosities and political interests that drove him to many of his projects. He also …
 
Jackie Tohn (Glow, Best Leftovers Ever, CHiPs) is an actress and musician. Jackie joins the Armchair Expert to discuss getting into acting in New York at nine-years-old, how she and Kristen became best friends and how being a boundaries-less person has affected her relationships. Jackie opens up about her past boyfriends and how they’ve all become …
 
Language warning. We use the word sh*t a lot in this episode, since it is, in fact all about poop. To wrap up this crappy, some may even say shitty year, host Adam Gamwell and intern Elizabeth Smyth discuss the origin of the word shit, how the way we defecate is culturally constructed, what our poop reveals about us, and so much more in this New Ye…
 
Since 1990 public political criticism has evolved into a prominent feature of Vietnam's political landscape. Over the last three decades, such criticism has become widespread around four main clusters of issues: factory workers demanding better wages and living standards; villagers demonstrating and petitioning against corruption and land confiscat…
 
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