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Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
Best Anthropology Podcasts We Could Find
These Anthropology podcasts cover everything from geology, biodiversity, uncommon knowledge about humans, culture, history, humanity’s potential and more ⁠— so explore these podcasts at your own leisure and you won’t be disappointed!
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The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
The Familiar Strange is a podcast about doing anthropology: that is, about listening, looking, trying out, and being with, in pursuit of uncommon knowledge about humans and culture. Find show notes, plus our blog about anthropology's role in the world, at https://www.thefamiliarstrange.com. Twitter: @tfsTweets. FB: facebook.com/thefamiliarstrange. Instagram: @thefamiliarstrange. Brought to you by your familiar strangers: Ian Pollock, Jodie-Lee Trembath, Julia Brown, Simon Theobald, Kylie Won ...
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. Join Anthropologist and culture expert Dr. Adam Gamwell for curated conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds on our creative potential through design, culture, business and technology. Change yo ...
 
A podcast about life, the universe and anthropology produced by David Boarder Giles, Timothy Neale, Cameo Dalley, Mythily Meher and Matt Barlow. Each episode features an anthropologist or two in conversation, discussing anthropology and what it has to tell us in the twenty-first century. This podcast is made in partnership with the American Anthropological Association and with support from the Faculty of Arts & Education at Deakin University.
 
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AnthroPod

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AnthroPod

Society for Cultural Anthropology

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AnthroPod is produced by the Society for Cultural Anthropology (http://www.culanth.org). Each episode, we explore what anthropologists and anthropology can teach us about the world and people around us.
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
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A Story of Us

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A Story of Us

Ohio State Anthropology graduate students

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An original podcast brought to you by the graduate students of the Department of Anthropology at The Ohio State University. Join us once as we explore the human experience! We are now a part of the Anthropology Public Outreach Program at The Ohio State University. Follow us @ohiostateAPOP
 
Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of American Anthropologist, the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association. It is a venue for highlighting the polyphony of voices across the discipline’s four fields and the infinite—and often overlapping—subfields within them. Through conversations, experiments in sonic ethnography, ethnographic journalism, and other (primarily but not exclusively) aural formats, Anthropological Airwaves endeavors to explore the conceptual, ...
 
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Decoding the Gurus

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Decoding the Gurus

Christopher Kavanagh and Matthew Browne

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An exiled Northern Irish anthropologist and a hitchhiking Australian psychologist take a close look at the contemporary crop of 'secular gurus', iconoclasts, and other exiles from the mainstream, offering their own brands of unique takes and special insights. Leveraging two of the most diverse accents in modern podcasting, Chris and Matt dig deep into the claims, peek behind the psychological curtains, and try to figure out once and for all... What's it all About? Join us, as we try to puzzl ...
 
Lore and Legends explores humanities past, present, and future through the lense of the lore and legends built up by dominant cultures like Ancient Egypt, Greece, and more forgotten or ignored groups like the Native Americans or Tribal Africans, as well as modern myths, legends, and phenomena from bigfoot, to UFO's, psychic powers and even religions.... https://www.loreandlegends.net
 
Tired of entrenched view tribalism and binary debates? A psychologist, a philosopher, and an anthropologist walk into a podcast to air out some echo chambers, and try and a fresh and radical perspective on the most controversial political, social and psychological debates. It's not about Left vs. Right, Us Vs. Them or Good vs. Evil. It's all about dialogue and beyond binary thinking!
 
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Online Gods

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Online Gods

Ian M Cook & Sahana Udupa

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Online Gods is a monthly podcast on digital cultures and their political ramifications, featuring lively conversations with scholars and activists. Presented by anthropologist Ian M. Cook, the podcast is a key initiative of the five year ERC project ONLINERPOL www.fordigitaldignity.com led by media anthropologist Sahana Udupa at LMU Munich, and cohosted by HAU Network for Ethnographic Theory. Online Gods represents our collective commitment to multimedia diffusion of research in accessible a ...
 
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The Insight

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The Insight

Insitome: Your guide to the story of you

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Where did we come from? One of humanity's most basic questions, the answer is fascinating. Weaving together insights from the fields of genetics, archaeology, linguistics, and paleoanthropology, hosts Spencer Wells and Razib Khan take us on a grand tour of human history. Scientific storytelling at its best.
 
What makes you … you? And who tells what stories and why? This season, SAPIENS hosts Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali explore stories of Black and Indigenous scholars as they transform the field of archeology and the stories that make us … us. SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human, is produced by House of Pod and supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation. SAPIENS is part of the American Anthropological Association Podcast Library. For more information, visit sapiens.org
 
The University of Oxford is home to an impressive range and depth of research activities in the Humanities. TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities is a major new initiative that seeks to build on this heritage and to stimulate and support research that transcends disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Here we feature some of the networks and programmes, as well as recordings of events, and offer insights into the research that they make possible.
 
Scientist. Activist. Storyteller. Icon. Jane Goodall blazed the trail and changed the world. Now, she's studying new subjects – humans! This brand-new podcast will take listeners on a one-of –a-kind journey as they learn from Dr. Goodall's extraordinary life, hear from changemaking guests from every arena, and become awed by a growing movement sparked by Jane and fueled by hope. Join us as we get curious, grow compassion and take action to build a better world for all.
 
The British Academy is the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences. We mobilise these disciplines to understand the world and shape a brighter future. ​ From artificial intelligence to climate change, from building prosperity to improving well-being – today’s complex challenges can only be resolved by deepening our insight into people, cultures and societies.​ We invest in researchers and projects across the UK and overseas, ​engage the public with fresh thinking and deb ...
 
How does work culture shape human behavior and experience? How do humans create cultures? From uncomfortable truths to heart-to-heart conversations, Culture First uncovers what it really takes to build a better world of work. We all aspire to rise above the day-to-day commotion and bring more humanity into our work lives. Our host Damon Klotz is dedicated to understanding how we find meaning in our work and how to better the experience humans have within organizations. Join him as he explore ...
 
What makes you … you? And who tells what stories and why? This season, SAPIENS hosts Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali explore stories of Black and Indigenous scholars as they transform the field of archeology and the stories that make us … us. SAPIENS: A Podcast for Everything Human, is produced by House of Pod and supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation. SAPIENS is part of the American Anthropological Association Podcast Library. For more information, visit sapiens.org
 
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#zimlove

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#zimlove

A Podcast about Zimbabwe. By Roma.

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#zimlove is a podcast where I, a foreigner who has been living and working in Zimbabwe for a couple years, tries to explain through the eyes of others, why I fell in love with this country. When I try to describe the beauty and diversity of this place, I fail because I cannot compete with hyperinflation and expensive safaris, which is the only thing that google spits out once you type in "Zimbabwe". In this podcast each person describes one true perspective on Zimbabwe from their own reality ...
 
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In Afterlives of Affect: Science, Religion, and an Edgewalker’s Spirit (Duke UP, 2020), Matthew C. Watson considers the life and work of artist and Mayanist scholar Linda Schele (1942-1998) as a point of departure for what he calls an excitable anthropology. As part of a small collective of scholars who devised the first compelling arguments that M…
 
From mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue to chronic bacterial infections such as yaws, Southeast Asia is home to a wide range of tropical diseases. For a long time, the arrival in the region of these and other dangerous tropical diseases was believed to be connected to the introduction of agriculture. But how long have these diseases…
 
Human-made climate change may have begun in the last two hundred years, but our species has witnessed many eras of climate instability. The results have not always been pretty. From Ancient Egypt to Rome to the Maya, some of history's mightiest civilizations have been felled by pestilence and glacial melt and drought. The challenges are no less gre…
 
In Confidence Culture (Duke UP, 2022), Shani Orgad and Rosalind Gill argue that imperatives directed at women to “love your body” and “believe in yourself” imply that psychological blocks rather than entrenched social injustices hold women back. Interrogating the prominence of confidence in contemporary discourse about body image, workplace, relati…
 
The border between Russia and China is one of the world’s longest, spanning thousands of miles. It’s one of the few extended land borders between two great powers, subject to years of history, conflict and cooperation. Yet for such an important division, there are surprisingly few crossings, with not one passenger bridge in operation. On the Edge: …
 
Hosts Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali share how they found their way to archaeology and what it means to be Black and Indigenous archaeologists. From defying the status quo in a classroom to diving through sunken ships, Ora and Yoli bring listeners on a journey of reclaiming stories and reimagining history. Time Stamps: (00:00:10) How host…
 
Hosts Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali share how they found their way to archaeology and what it means to be Black and Indigenous archaeologists. From defying the status quo in a classroom to diving through sunken ships, Ora and Yoli bring listeners on a journey of reclaiming stories and reimagining history. Time Stamps: (00:00:10) How host…
 
Stepping Up: COVID-19 Checkpoints and Rangatiratanga (Huia Publishers, 2021) discusses the roadside checkpoints that were set up by Māori to protect communities during the nationwide COVID-19 lockdown in 2020. Case studies of four different checkpoints are examined, each of which looked slightly different, but all of which were underpinned by tikan…
 
Up to Heaven and Down to Hell (Princeton UP, 2021) is a vivid and sometimes heartbreaking account of what happens when one of the most momentous decisions about the well-being of our communities and our planet--whether or not to extract shale gas and oil from the very land beneath our feet--is largely a private choice that millions of ordinary peop…
 
It's a common truism that history is often written by the victors, but it is equally true that the actual story is more complicated. One of the most poignant examples of this is the "discovery" of the new world by Christopher Columbus. So today I am super excited to have author Andrew Rowen back on the podcast. Andrew caught our attention back in 2…
 
Embattled Dreamlands: The Politics of Contesting Armenian, Kurdish and Turkish Memory (Routledge, 2020) explores the complex relationship between competing national myths, imagined boundaries and local memories in the threefold-contested geography referred to as Eastern Turkey, Western Armenia or Northern Kurdistan. Spatially rooted in the shatter …
 
In Folk Literati, Contested Tradition, and Heritage in Contemporary China: Incense Is Kept Burning (Indiana UP, 2020), Ziying You explores the role of the "folk literati" in negotiating, defining, and maintaining local cultural heritage. Expanding on the idea of the elite literati―a widely studied pre-modern Chinese social group, influential in cul…
 
Pete found himself being called out this week, and he and Jen share their thoughts and reactions to the ideas in the book Who Not How, which inspired this week's episode. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: Why is it important to add people to your team and to work with people that have different strengths? Why might someone want…
 
On today’s podcast Jessica interviews Dr. Joe Stahlman (Tuscarora descent), Director of Seneca Nation’s Seneca-Iroquois National Museum-Onöhsagwë:de' Culture Center and Seneca Nation’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office. Joe takes us through his career journey, including what it’s like to direct both a museum and a THPO office. Along the way we di…
 
In this episode of the Hopecast, Dr. Jane Goodall speaks with Paul Polman, business leader, campaigner, and author of Net Positive: How Courageous Companies Thrive by Giving More Than They Take. He is also the co-founder and chair of IMAGINE, an organization that strives to build net positive companies that combat climate change, nature loss and gl…
 
In Toward Camden (Duke UP, 2021), Mercy Romero writes about the relationships that make and sustain the largely African American and Puerto Rican Cramer Hill neighborhood in New Jersey where she grew up. She walks the city and writes outdoors to think about the collapse and transformation of property. She revisits lost and empty houses—her family's…
 
Visit https://www.loreandlegends.net/2022/01/the-carancas-event.html for more info! In September 2007 a meteorite would hit the earth outside the village of Carancas Peru. It left behind a large crater, pieces of the meteor...and a strange illness that seems to have swept through the area in humans and animals alike. What was the cause? And are we …
 
A late entry into the worst people ever compendium, Tomas de Torquemada, the first and greatest Grand Inquisitor of The Spanish Inquisition. A man who began with a broad national mandate to root out heretics and insincere converses, and ended so loathed by everyone in Spain that he needed armed escorts wherever he went. A zealot so intransigent tha…
 
Mainland Southeast Asia is one of the most fascinating and complex cultural and linguistic areas in the world. This book provides a rich and comprehensive survey of the history and core systems and subsystems of the languages of this fascinating region. Drawing on his depth of expertise in mainland Southeast Asia, Enfield includes more than a thous…
 
What can years of ethnographic engagement with rural Indonesia teach us about capitalism, development, and resistance? On this episode of Ethnographic Marginalia, our guest is Dr. Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Tania tells us about three decades of research on development programs, local activism, and class format…
 
How did humans come to be who we are? In his marvelous, eccentric, and widely lauded book Being a Beast, legal scholar, veterinary surgeon, and naturalist extraordinaire Charles Foster set out to understand the consciousness of animal species by living as a badger, otter, fox, deer, and swift. Now, he inhabits three crucial periods of human develop…
 
Every day, hundreds of thousands of people move through the Gare du Nord train station in the 10th arrondissement of Paris, the largest train station in Europe. Julie Kleinman's Adventure Capital: Migration and the Making of an African Hub in Paris (University of California Press, 2019) delves into the contemporary life of the station, and especial…
 
Matt and Chris return to the Joe Rogan-verse much quicker than they would have liked to take a critical eye to two recent episodes (6 more hours!!!) offering controversial takes on Covid 19 and the dangers of vaccines. Yes, that's right more fear mongering, more global conspiracies, and more unrecognised heroes of science that Joe needs to promote …
 
We're launching a new season, asking what makes you … you? And who tells which stories and why? SAPIENS hosts Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali explore stories of Black and Indigenous scholars as they transform the field of archeology and the stories that make us … us. (00:00:02) Meet Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali (00:00:51) How seaso…
 
We're launching a new season, asking what makes you … you? And who tells which stories and why? SAPIENS hosts Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali explore stories of Black and Indigenous scholars as they transform the field of archeology and the stories that make us … us. (00:00:02) Meet Dr. Ora Marek-Martinez and Yoli Ngandali (00:00:51) How seaso…
 
In Becoming Palestine: Toward an Archival Imagination of the Future (Duke UP, 2021), Gil Z. Hochberg examines how contemporary Palestinian artists, filmmakers, dancers, and activists use the archive in order to radically imagine Palestine's future. She shows how artists such as Jumana Manna, Kamal Aljafari, Larissa Sansour, Farah Saleh, Basel Abbas…
 
Inspired by a visit from a former teacher of hers, Jen shares her learnings with Pete and together they unpack the cyclical journey of teaching and leading. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: Why is it important to lean in to teachable moments? What might be the goals of a good teacher and/or leader? How does a student eventuall…
 
Based on comparative ethnographic research in four countries and three continents, Butinage: The Art of Religious Mobility (U Toronto Press, 2021) explores the notion of "religious butinage" as a conceptual framework intended to shed light on the dynamics of everyday religious practice. Derived from the French word butiner, which refers to the fora…
 
We are so happy to wish you all a Happy New Year and welcome you back for Season 6 of Disasters:Deconstructed!!! We are again very excited to spend time with you again - or for the first time - as we explore why disasters really happen. Our new season is focused on a cadre of emerging researchers that are challenging the sacred cows of (disaster) r…
 
Visit https://www.loreandlegends.net/2022/01/the-universe-25-experiment.html for more info! What could be our ultimate doom? Climate, disease, lack of resources, war? Its hard to say, but one experiment in the late 1960s designed and carried out by John Calhoun dubbed "Universe 25" suggested safety, surplus, and comfort could be just as if not more…
 
Amy C. Sullivan explores the complexity of America’s opioid epidemic through firsthand accounts of people grappling with the reverberating effects of stigma, treatment, and recovery. Taking a clear-eyed, nonjudgmental perspective of every aspect of these issues—drug use, parenting, harm reduction, medication, abstinence, and stigma—Opioid Reckoning…
 
In Between Gaia and Ground: Four Axioms of Existence and the Ancestral Catastrophe of Late Liberalism (Duke UP, 2021), Elizabeth A. Povinelli theorizes the climatic, environmental, viral, and social catastrophe present as an ancestral catastrophe through which that Indigenous and colonized peoples have been suffering for centuries. In this way, the…
 
The Ansaru Allah Community, also known as the Nubian Islamic Hebrews (AAC/NIH) and later the Nuwaubians, is a deeply significant and controversial African American Muslim movement. Founded in Brooklyn in the 1960s, it spread through the prolific production and dissemination of literature and lecture tapes and became famous for continuously reinvent…
 
As a start to 2022, Pete and Jen outline their processes for reflecting on the past year and planning for the year ahead. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about: What are some strategies to actively reflect on 2021? How might we collect data from the past year and apply our learning to the year moving forward? What is Jen's word or p…
 
Quyền Văn Minh (b. 1954) is not only a jazz saxophonist and lecturer at the prestigious Vietnam National Academy of Music, but he is also one of the most preeminent jazz musicians in Vietnam. Considered a pioneer in the country, Minh is often publicly recognized as the “godfather of Vietnamese jazz.” Playing Jazz in Socialist Vietnam: Quyền Văn Min…
 
Astrologers play an important role in Indian society, but there are very few studies on their social identity and professional practices. Based on extensive fieldwork carried out in the city of Banaras, Words of Destiny: Practicing Astrology in North India (SUNY Press, 2021) shows how the Brahmanical scholarly tradition of astral sciences (jyotiḥśā…
 
Viktoriya Kim, Nelia Balgoa, and Beverley Anne Yamamoto's book The Politics of International Marriage in Japan (Rutgers UP, 2021) provides an in-depth exploration and analysis of marriages between Japanese nationals and migrants from three broad ethnic/cultural groups - spouses from the former Soviet Union countries, the Philippines, and Western co…
 
A Recipe for Gentrification: Food, Power, and Resistance in the City (NYU Press, 2020), edited by Alison Hope Alkon, Yuki Kato, and Joshua Sbicca, is a collection of essays examining how gentrification uproots the urban food landscape, and what activists are doing to resist it. From hipster coffee shops to upscale restaurants, a bustling local food…
 
The New Year is upon us and the gurologists thought they should contribute to the holiday cheer in the only way they can... releasing a rambling podcast about academic minutiae! This is not a new guru episode, instead it is a preview of our Patreon bonus series 'Decoding Academia' in which we discuss research that has influenced us & we think is re…
 
The Nuosu people, who were once overlords of vast tracts of farmland and forest in the uplands of southern Sichuan and neighboring provinces, are the largest division of the Yi ethnic group in southwest China. Their creation epic plots the origins of the cosmos, the sky and earth, and the living beings of land and water. This translation is a rare …
 
This week, riffing on a popular theme, Jen and Pete unpack their favorite things of 2021. Specifically, in this episode Jen and Pete talk about their favorite: Fiction book. Non-fiction book. Documentary/Film/TV show. TLATSOI podcast episode. Habit. Person of 2021. To hear all Episodes and read full transcripts visit The Long and The Short Of It we…
 
Have you ever stopped to think about your local grocery cooperative and what makes it different than, say Safeway or Giant or Whole Foods? That is, if you have a grocery cooperative in your neighborhood – they are neither ubiquitous nor evenly distributed. They do, however, offer perhaps the most visible model of how economic practices can exist ou…
 
Thank you all so much for joining us again or for the first time this year - We hope you enjoyed seasons 4 and 5 and learning from all the incredible guests that shared their time and ideas with us! Today we are very excited to bring you the 2021 Christmas Special! Don't expect anything too serious, because we are mostly messing about ;) We appreci…
 
In Making Women Pay: Microfinance in Urban India (Duke UP, 2022), Smitha Radhakrishnan explores India's microfinance industry, which in the past two decades has come to saturate the everyday lives of women in the name of state-led efforts to promote financial inclusion and women's empowerment. Despite this favorable language, Radhakrishnan argues, …
 
In Intersectionality in the Muslim South Asian-American Middle Class: Lifestyle Consumption beyond Halal and Hijab (Lexington Books, 2021), wherein Ternikar theorizes the everyday consumption of South Asian Muslim American women through case studies of their food, clothing, and social media presence. Through feminist, intersectional, and sociology …
 
In Visions of Beirut: The Urban Life of Media Infrastructure (Duke UP, 2021), Hatim El-Hibri explores how the creation and circulation of images has shaped the urban spaces and cultural imaginaries of Beirut. Drawing on fieldwork and texts ranging from maps, urban plans, and aerial photographs to live television and drone-camera footage, El-Hibri t…
 
Objects in object-oriented ontology (OOO) are mysterious and inexhaustible entities. But since OOO grants ontological priority to objects, it should have an easy time referring to objects. But this is not the case. In The Interfact: On Structure and Compatibility in Object-Oriented Ontology (Open Humanities Press, 2021), Yoran researches the questi…
 
Lucie Fremlova's book Queer Roma (Routledge, 2021) offers in-depth insight into the lives of queer Roma, thus providing rich evidence of the heterogeneity of Roma. The lived experiences of queer Roma, which are very diverse regionally and otherwise, pose a fundamental challenge to one-dimensional, negative misrepresentations of Roma as homophobic a…
 
Vertiginous Life: An Anthropology of Time and the Unforeseen (Berghahn Books, 2021) provides a theory of the intense temporal disorientation brought about by life in crisis. In the whirlpool of unforeseen social change, people experience confusion as to where and when they belong on timelines of previously unquestioned pasts and futures. Through in…
 
On today’s podcast Jessica catches up with Heritage Voices Episode 8 guest Anna Cordova, Lead Archaeologist for the city of Colorado Springs (although, to be clear, she is not representing the city with this interview). Anna is also Chairman on the Board of Trustees of the non-profit Jessica co-founded, Living Heritage Research Council. First, we t…
 
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