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Best American Society For Microbiology podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best American Society For Microbiology podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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This Week in Microbiology is a podcast about unseen life on Earth hosted by Vincent Racaniello and friends. Following in the path of his successful shows 'This Week in Virology' (TWiV) and 'This Week in Parasitism' (TWiP), Racaniello and guests produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.
 
Revealing more about microbiologists, the work they do, and what makes them tick. We ask them what they're up to now and what's next? How is the science moving forward to solve some of the intractable problems of our times? What keeps them going in a tough, competitive field? What do they see for the future of research, education, and training? We hope to show you a glimpse of what scientists are really like and what's going on in cutting-edge research today.
 
A video podcast by the American Society for Microbiology that highlights the latest in microbiology, life science and biotechnology news. ASM is composed of over 42,000 scientists and health professionals with the mission to advance the microbial sciences as a vehicle for understanding life processes and to apply and communicate this knowledge for the improvement of health and environmental and economic well-being worldwide. For information about ASM and MicrobeWorld, visit us online at www. ...
 
Microbe Magazine Podcast is a monthly science podcast hosted by Jeff Fox, features editor for Microbe Magazine, published by the American Society for Microbiology. Each podcast episode coincides with an article in the current issue of Microbe, which is available online at www.microbemagazine.org. Please contact Patrick Lacey, Managing Editor for Microbe, with any questions, feedback or show ideas at placey@asmusa.org.
 
A video podcast by the American Society for Microbiology that highlights the latest in microbiology, life science and biotechnology news. ASM is composed of over 42,000 scientists and health professionals with the mission to advance the microbial sciences as a vehicle for understanding life processes and to apply and communicate this knowledge for the improvement of health and environmental and economic well-being worldwide. For information about ASM and MicrobeWorld, visit us online at www. ...
 
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The TWiM discusses eradicating racism in academia and STEM, and a peptide from commensal bacteria that protects skin from damage caused by MRSA Become a patron of TWiM Links for this episode: Responsibility in academic research Improving equity in faculty hiring (MBoC) #ShutDownSTEM Peptide protects skin from microbial damage (AAC) Agr phase varian…
 
The TWiM team explains how breathing can transmit SARS-CoV-2, and how lack of breathing leads to loss of mitochondria in a multicellular parasitic animal. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2 (Science) Why social distancing is important (NY Times) Parasite without mitochondria (PNAS) Letters read on T…
 
The TWiM team explains an experimental vaccine to prevent E. coli urinary tract infections, and the remarkable three-way symbiosis of narnaviruses, bacteria, and fungi. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Developing a vaccine for UTI (mBio) Narnaviru…
 
What kinds of microorganisms can degrade oil? How do scientists prioritize ecosystems for bioremediation after an oil spill? Joel Kostka discusses his research and the lessons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill that will help scientists be better prepared for oil spills of the future. Links for this Episode: Joel Kostka Lab Website Kostka J. et a…
 
The TWiM team discuses saliva as more sensitive for SARS-CoV-2 detection in COVID-19 patients than nasopharyngeal swab and how Mycobacterium tuberculosis sulfolipid-1 activates nociceptive neurons and induces cough. Links for this episode: Preventing the next pandemic (NY Times) COVID-19 treatment guidelines (NIH) Saliva sensitive for SARS-CoV-2 de…
 
How do arboviruses evolve as they pass between different hosts? Greg Ebel discusses his research on West Nile virus evolution and what it means for viral diversity. He also talks about using mosquitos’ most recent blood meal to survey human health in a process called xenosurveillance. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: Mosquitoes and other arthropods have …
 
A ferret model for infection by SARS-CoV-2, and how Neolithization lead to emergence of a human bacterial pathogen. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson and Michael Schmidt Links for this episode: Infection and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in ferrets (Cell Host Micr) Neolithization led to emergence of Salmonella enterica (Nat E…
 
Vincent, Elio and Michael reveal the ASM COVID-19 summit, and how Salmonella injects a protein into the cell to drive suppression of the immune response. ASM COVID-19 Summit Value of SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing (mBio) How SARS-CoV-2 is changing (nextstrain) Contribute to COVID-19 data Salmonella effector suppresses inflammation (Cell Host Micr) S…
 
How can the intricate relationship between soil microbiota and plants be managed for improved plant health? Linda Kinkel discusses new insights into the plant rhizosphere and the ways that some Streptomyces isolates can protect agricultural crops against bacterial, fungal, oomycete, and nematode infections. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: The soil micro…
 
Vincent, Elio and Michael discuss the stability of human coronaviruses on surfaces and in aerosols, and peptidoglycan production by a mosaic consisting of a bacterium within a bacterium within an insect. Links for this episode: Human coronavirus 229E infectivity on common surfaces (mBio) Aerosol and surface stability of SARS-CoV-2 (medRxiv) Peptido…
 
Pathogenic E. coli are different than lab-grown or commensal E. coli found in the gut microbiome. Alfredo Torres describes the difference between these, the method his lab is using the develop vaccines against pathogenic E. coli, and how this same method can be used to develop vaccines against Burkholderia infections. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: col…
 
The most common analogy for CRISPR systems is that of molecular scissors. Joe Bondy-Denomy offers an alternative analogy from the bacteriophage perspective, all based on scientific data. 👍 Subscribe to ASM's YouTube channel 🔬 Learn more about the American Society for Microbiology at asm.org ✅ Become a member today at asmscience.org/join 📱 Join us o…
 
Does the fetus have a microbiome? How does the placenta prevent infection? Carolyn Coyne talks about placental structure and biology, and why studying the maternal-fetal interface remains a critical area of research. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: The placenta forms within 3-5 days post conception as a single layer of cells surrounding the fertilized e…
 
The TWiM team reviews the coronavirus outbreak that began in Wuhan, China, and the finding that an IRF deficiency underlies Whipple’s disease. 2019-nCoV case tracking (JHU) Clinical features of infection with 2019-nCoV (Lancet) Early transmission dynamics of 2019-nCoV (NEJM) Isolation of 2019-nCoV (NEJM) TLR4 defect in Whipple’s disease (eLife) Bec…
 
Are there drugs that can treat coronaviruses? Timothy Sheahan talks about his drug discovery work on a compound that can inhibit all coronaviruses tested so far, and tells how his career path took him to pharmaceutical antiviral research and then back to academia. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: Even though the MERS-CoV was discovered as a human pathoge…
 
We may not see microplastics, but they are all around us. These microplastics play a role in shaping the microbial environment, and this talk will explain how. 👍 Subscribe to ASM's YouTube channel at https://goo.gl/mOVHlK 🔬 Learn more about the American Society for Microbiology at http://www.asm.org ✅ Become a member today at http://www.asmscience.…
 
Viral gastroenteritis around the world causes 200,000 deaths globally each year. Mary Estes talks about her work on 2 gastroenteritis-causing viruses, rotavirus and norovirus, and tells the story of her discovery of the first viral enterotoxin. She also describes how noroviruses have changed from human volunteer studies to studies using “miniguts,”…
 
The Fellowship of the TWiM reveal that colorectal cancer-associated microbiota are associated with higher numbers of methylated genes in colonic mucosa, and identification of metabolites needed by the fire blight disease bacterium for virulence in apples. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Colorectal cancer and the gut microbiome (PNA…
 
The most abundant organism on Earth lives in its seas: the marine bacterium SAR11. Steve Giovannoni describes how the origins of SAR11 provided its name, and the ways that studying SAR11 have taught scientists about ocean ecology. He also discusses how the different depths of the ocean vary in their microbial compositions and what his big questions…
 
Can a protein be contagious? Jason Bartz discusses his work on prion proteins, which cause spongiform encephalopathy and can be transmitted by ingestion or inhalation among some animals. He further discusses how prions can exist as different strains, and what techniques may help improve diagnosis of subclinical infections. Links for this Episode: J…
 
The Microbial Comrades present the oldest osteosynthesis in history, and how a small molecule produced by stressed bacteria is a warning signal that repels healthy populations to promote their survival. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson and Michael Schmidt Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Androi…
 
Microbial interactions drive microbial evolution, and in a polymicrobial infection, these interactions can determine patient outcome. Deb Hogan talks about her research on interkingdom interactions between the bacterium Pseudomonas and the fungus Candida, 2 organisms that can cause serious illness in cystic fibrosis patients’ lung infections. Her r…
 
The TWiM team reveals how ribosome modification resuscitates bacterial persister cells, and explain how a phage tail fiber protein exploits rotation of flagella to move towards the cell membrane. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Ribosome modification resuscitates persister cells (Environ Micro) Flagellotrophic phage targets host wit…
 
Many hospital-acquired bacterial infections are also drug-resistant. Amy Mathers describes her work tracking these bacteria to their reservoir in hospital sinks, and what tools allowed her team to make these discoveries. Mathers also discusses her work on Klebsiella, a bacterial pathogen for the modern era. Subscribe (free) on Apple Podcasts, Googl…
 
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson and Michael Schmidt Guests: Deanna Beatty, Mark Hay, Gina Lewin, Frank Stewart, and Marvin Whiteley At Georgia Tech, members and trainees of the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection discuss the identification of pathogen essential genes during coinfections, and how coral management can improve coral…
 
How do medical professionals incorporate microbiome science into their patient care? Ami Bhatt discusses her research on the diversity within and between human gut microbiomes, and how this research is slowly and carefully being used to build new patient care recommendations. Subscribe (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by …
 
From ASM Microbe 2019 in San Francisco, Vincent speaks with Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy about advancing human health through innovative collaborations. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy Links for this episode: Getting grants (Virulence) Nitric oxide synthase protects against tubercu…
 
Identified in the 1980s, Borrelia burgdorferi and other Lyme disease-associated spirochetes have since been found throughout the world. Jorge Benach answers questions about Lyme Disease symptoms, his role in identifying the causative bacterium, and his current research on multispecies pathogens carried by hard-bodied ticks. Julie’s Biggest Takeaway…
 
The TWiM holobionts pay tribute to Stuart Levy, and reveal the remarkably diverse array of cyclic nucleotides synthesized by bacteria that likely mediate interactions with animal and plant hosts. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Stuart Levy, Antibiotic Resistance Researcher, Dies Resistance fighter (The Scientist) Stuart Levy on TWi…
 
Influenza is famous for its ability to mutate and evolve but are mutations always the virus’ friend? Jesse Bloom discusses his work on influenza escape from serum through mutation and how mutations affect influenza virus function and transmission. Subscribe (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Also available on the …
 
The tetracoccal TWiM team visits Tardigrades on the Moon, and the twelve year quest to isolate an archaeon that provides insights into the emergence of the first eukaryotic cell. Links for this episode: Tardigrades on the moon (Mashable) Meet the Tardigrade (WaPo) Archaeon at prokaryote-eukaryote interface (bioRxiv) Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTun…
 
Graciela Lorca studies genetic systems to find positive and negative microbial interactions that lead to disease. She talks about her discovery of chemical inhibitors for the citrus greening disease bacterium, Liberibacter asiaticus,and how a specific strain of Lactobacillus johnsoniimodulates the immune system and may help prevent development of d…
 
Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Nicholas Arpaia and Tal Danino Vincent meets up with Nick and Tal to explain how they engineered E. coli to lyse within tumors and deliver an antibody that causes tumor regression in mice. Links for this episode: Programmable bacteria induce tumor immunity (Nat Med) Synchronized cycles of bacterial lysis (Nature) TW…
 
When a new biothreat or emerging infectious agent threatens, how are diagnostic protocols put into place? It’s up to the Laboratory Response Network (LRN), a multipartner network of public health, clinical and other labs, to generate and distribute reagents, and provide training to detect these threats. Julie Villanueva, Chief of the Laboratory Pre…
 
The TWiM team reveals thousands of small novel genes in the human microbiome, and a mutualistic symbiosis between marine protists covered with magnetosome-containing bacteria. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson and Michael Schmidt Links for this episode Thousands of small novel genesin human microbiome (Cell) A magnetotacti…
 
George F. Gao discusses how China CDC promotes global public health during outbreaks SARS and Ebola. He also talks about running a structural biology lab, the importance of both basic and translational research, and the most important discovery of the 20th century. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: China CDC was founded in 2001. Its experience with the SA…
 
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson and Michael Schmidt Guest: Julie Wolf Julie joins the TWiM team to reveal how microbiome and gut anatomy of a wood-feeding beetle promotes lignocellulose deconstruction, and bacteria that degrade PET plastic. How wood-feeding beetles deconstruct lignocellulose (PNAS) Meet the Microbiologis…
 
Bacteriophage are viruses that infect specific bacteria. Jeremy Barr discusses his discovery that phage interact with (but don’t infect) mammalian epithelial cells. He explains how these different organisms: bacteria, bacteriophage, and the mammalian host, may exist in three-way symbioses. Subscribe (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Androi…
 
Mark Martin joins Vincent and Michael to present compelling papers suitable for teaching microbiology to undergraduate students. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Paradigm shifts, paradigm drifts (pdf) Introducing THOR (mBio) Engineering bacteriophages to treat mycobacterial infection (Nat Med) Biofilms by Colter (Int Microbiol) Life…
 
Stanley Maloy discusses his career in Salmonella research, which started with developing molecular tools and is now focused on the role of Salmonella genome plasticity in niche development. He further talks about his role in science entrepreneurship, science education, and working with an international research community. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways:…
 
Vincent, Michele, and Michael travel to San Diego to reminisce with Elio about his career, his work in microbiology, and his love for microbes and mushrooms. VIDEO VERSION AVAILABLE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Menlo1YvPko Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email.Get the entire ASM Podcast Network v…
 
Cheese rinds contain microbial communities that are relatively simple to study in the lab while offering insight into other, more complex microbial ecosystems. Rachel Dutton discusses her work studying these cheese microbiomes, one of the few microbial ecosystem types where almost all of the microorganisms are culturable. Subscribe (free) on Apple …
 
From ASM Microbe 2019, the Microbials meet up with Susanna L. Harris and Alex Politis to talk about mental health in graduate school and NIH peer review. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swansonand Michael Schmidt Guests: Susanna L. Harrisand Alex Politis Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Get …
 
Most diagnostic tests look for a single microorganism, or at most a limited panel of microorganisms. Charles Chiu discusses his research on metagenomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool that can identify all potential pathogens in a given patient sample. Links for this Episode: MTM Listener Survey, only takes 3 minutes! Thanks;) Charles Chiu Profile …
 
The TWiM team presents an extracellular bacterium associated with Paramecium, and induction of antiviral immunity by a bacteriophage that prevents bacterial clearance. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a Patron of TWiM…
 
While searching for lignin-degrading soil microbes, Gautam Dantas discovered growth in an antimicrobial compound-containing control! He has since studied the resistance determinants (resistome) of soil and clinical samples to determine their similarities. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways: Sequencing information is extremely useful for descriptive studies,…
 
Pat Brown founded Impossible Foods with a mission to replace animals as a food production technology. Here, he discusses the ways microbial engineering helps produce the plant hemoglobin that provides the Impossible Burger’s meaty qualities. Links for this episode: Take the MTM listener survey(~3 min.) The Microbial Reasons Why the Impossible Taste…
 
CRISPR is a genome-editing tool, but what is its role in microbial biology and evolution? Joe Bondy-Denomy discusses his discovery of the first anti-CRISPR protein and the many unanswered questions surrounding CRISPR biology. Julie’s Biggest Takeaways CRISPR is a bacterial immune system that identifies and destroys specific nucleotide sequences. Th…
 
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