×
Baseballsports public
[search 0]
×
Best Baseballsports podcasts we could find (updated January 2020)
Best Baseballsports podcasts we could find
Updated January 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Baseball is the perfect sport for conversation, and no one can converse about it better than the Baseball Rabbi, one of the world's greatest experts on advanced statistics, sabermetrics, and baseball history. Join Pesach Wolicki and Scott Kahn as they apply advanced metrics to the Major Leagues, reevaluate historical assumptions, and discover new baseball trends and theories that will leave you questioning everything you assumed you knew about the National Pastime.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Ted Simmons retired as the all time hit leader for catchers - and garnered 3.7% of the Hall of Fame vote in his first year of eligibility. Why did it take another 25 years for one of the greatest catchers ever to get in? Along the way we look at THE decade of dominant catchers (it's not the 1950s), as well as the travesty of Marvin Miller's Hall of…
 
The Houston Astros cheating scandal has been discussed and dissected, but the Baseball Rabbi has new statistical evidence that no one else has revealed. Join Pesach Wolicki as he crunches some numbers that produce something akin to a smoking gun. Plus: more on the Astros' historical legacy and institutional culture, and Scott Kahn (shockingly) expl…
 
Everyone might know who's going to be the Rookie of the Year in each league, but there's a lot more to discuss regarding one of the strongest rookie classes in years. And what is "Rookie of the Year" supposed to represent, anyway - the player with the best rookie season, or the biggest upside? Plus: ranking the absolute worst candidates for Most Va…
 
The World Champion Nats beat the Astros, and A.J. Hinch might be responsible. What did he do wrong? The Baseball Rabbi also looks at underrated MVP Stephen Strasburg, Ted Williams-ish Juan Soto, and brilliant Yordan Alvarez (but did he actually face decent pitching?). Plus: the Cubs are the dynasty that wasn't; is it time to tear it down, or is the…
 
The World Series matchup that pitching enthusiasts were hoping for is finally here! Join Pesach and Scott for a look at some Series storylines, along with a deeper dive into the Astros' place in baseball history. Plus: the Yankees haven't won a pennant in ten years, even though they have baseball's best regular season record during that time. Is th…
 
The Dodgers didn't just blow it; the Nationals played really, really well. But yes, the Dodgers also blew it - and Dave Roberts deserves some of the blame. What ties his controversial playoff pitching decisions from the past three years together? Also: are Clayton Kershaw's postseason struggles a thing, or a statistical anomaly? Plus a few sentence…
 
(Because of Yom Kippur, the Baseball Rabbi is off this week. We'll be back next week with a brand new episode, dropping on Wednesday, October 16th. In the meantime, enjoy this classic episode from July, 2018.) The Baltimore Orioles are in the midst of a historically bad season, made even worse by the fact that just a few years ago, they had the cha…
 
Back in March, Pesach predicted that the Nats would win 100 games... and they didn't. Why? Because despite their victory over the Brewers and a roster that looks fantastic, this is a team with a massive flaw. (Get ready for some numbers guaranteed to make Washington natives nauseous.) And here are the A's again - is their success sort of a mirage, …
 
Conventional wisdom states that a team with three great pitchers in its playoff pitching rotation has a enhanced opportunity of winning it all. But is this actually true? Join Pesach and Scott for a look at the playoff teams with the all time greatest front ends of their rotations, and what that meant for their postseason success. The Baseball Rabb…
 
Pedro Martinez in 2000 had, quite possibly, the greatest season in the history of pitching - and Pesach and Scott will tell you why. (They'll also show why his 1999 was, according to a different perspective, potentially even better.) They also offer some nuggets on the Astros, Dodgers, and Yankees as they look toward the postseason. And of course, …
 
Anyone looking at the Cubs back in 2016 would have seen an absolute juggernaut: a team that excelled in hitting, pitching, and defense. So why didn't they become a dynasty? Using a brand new metric from stat guru Moshe Schorr, Pesach and Scott analyze the Cubs' greatness and subsequent decline. Plus: we promised no more talking about historic badne…
 
In our last episode, Pesach and Scott were utterly mystified at how the Cardinals keep winning with.. well, basically nothing. But this week, Pesach offers some fascinating numbers that show where St. Louis excels, and why they win in the most boring manner possible. The pod also revisits the Mets' trades at the deadline, and argues that winning th…
 
Home Runs are up. Batting averages are up. Strikeouts are up. Can anyone make sense of these trends? Is this an offensive boom or a pitching renaissance? The Baseball Rabbi collects the numbers and determines what's actually going on... and figures out exactly what changed between 2018 and 2019. Plus: the puzzling St. Louis Cardinals (who look medi…
 
The Orioles went 1-9 against the Yankees and Astros in one ten game stretch, but what they accomplished during that span was pretty amazing. (If you're an Orioles fan, it might be more horrifying than amazing, but that's a matter of perspective.) Pesach and Scott also look at the best pitchers in baseball, and argue about who would deserve the Cy Y…
 
The Mets have been on fire, and Pesach and Scott want to understand why. Apparently, there are some not-so-secret secrets if you look closely that might explain what's actually going on. (Hint: it's all about a new guy on the field.) Plus: beautiful Coors Field, the effect of parking lots on baseball history, and who's having the worse season: 2019…
 
Bryce Harper's 2019 WAR shows that he's not very good. But Pesach, Scott, and special guest Moshe Schorr share the surprising WPA reality that when it comes to what actually matters in baseball, Harper is in the same league as Yellich, Bellinger, and Trout. They also analyze the Steroid Era, and discuss whether and why it truly mattered. And is Joh…
 
Which players had the greatest consecutive ten year stretches, using bWAR as a gauge? Join Pesach and Scott for a discussion about the results of this experiment, the greatness of Willie Mays and Walter Johnson, the relative merits of A-Rod and Pujols, Trout's place on the list, the missing catchers, and much more. Plus: notes on buyers and sellers…
 
The Hall of Fame inducted its new members on Sunday, and the Baseball Rabbi is here to tell you amazing stats you never knew about each one of them. (Except Harold Baines. You already know everything you need to know about him.) Indeed, Pesach and Scott offer new ways of looking at Halladay, Mariano, Edgar, Mussina, and Lee that demonstrate why the…
 
What are the greatest teams ever to play Major League Baseball? Pesach says that run differential - both per game and per season - provides part of the answer, but also explains why this alone is likely insufficient. He and Scott also look into whether it's easier to be bad than to be good, and how the answer affects the way we analyze prewar teams…
 
Pesach hasn't watched an All Star Game since 1983, and he's proud of it. Why does he dislike it so? (Scott is like everyone else: the game is fine, whatever, nice break, who cares.) Once they get past that discussion, they deal with the historically unusual disparity in the American League, the crazy parity in the NL Central, and more storylines to…
 
It's always nice to see a team with a chance to do something truly historic; and when two teams are racing toward the same goal, the excitement is doubled. Unfortunately for people in Baltimore and Detroit, the race is for the all-time worst run differential. (And you better believe that it matters.) Join Pesach and Scott as they discuss why this s…
 
"Being a Montreal Expos fan is a frustration like no other." With the news of the (very unlikely) possibility of baseball returning to Montreal for half a season annually, Pesach finds some old wounds suddenly reopened, and he shares years of baseball trauma with the Baseball Rabbi audience. Scott also opines why teams relocating is almost inevitab…
 
It's been asked regarding Victor Hugo whether a creative genius can also be relatively unintelligent; the baseball equivalent might be whether a member of the 400 home run club can also be a mediocre player. The answer, evidently, is yes (Hi there, Adam Dunn!); but was this always true? Does the same analysis apply to players with 500 HRs? Pesach a…
 
The Washington Nationals are on pace to do something pretty unusual: lead the league in starting pitcher WAR while losing most of their games. But they don't hold a candle to the '91 Indians, who pulled the trick while losing 105 games. (Read that again. 105 losses while leading MLB in starting pitcher WAR.) How does that even happen? Plus: Why Sch…
 
How good is Justin Verlander, really? That's not a question that's easy to answer, but at age 36, he's doing things that, if he keeps it up, have never been seen in baseball history. The best comparison might be the owner of the Triple-A Round Rock Express, who once was a pretty good pitcher himself, or Jim Palmer, who made an appearance in our las…
 
The Baseball Rabbi Podcast is constantly invoking WAR - wins above replacement - as the most telling of all advanced baseball stats. But how do we explain the instances where Fangraphs and Baseball Reference calculate drastically different WAR numbers for the same player? Using Tommy John as a test case, Pesach and Scott present the fundamental dif…
 
Adrian Beltre is unquestionably a Hall of Famer, one of the greatest players we've ever seen. But where does he rank among all-time third basemen? Is he just a good player who stayed around long enough to compile amazing stats, or is he another Mike Schmidt? Can a player who wasn't an all star until he was 31 be considered greater than Boggs or Bre…
 
The Nationals, once again, are MLB's strangest team: great pitching, decent hitting, and a rotten record. What's going on? Also, hear Pesach take a bow as his prediction about the Twins seems to be coming true (though he hopes you'll forget about that pesky Red Sox episode two weeks ago), but explains that Minnesota is not quite as good as you thou…
 
After striking out his 3000th batter, CC Sabathia is essentially on the same level as Hall of Famers Niekro, Jenkins, and Smoltz... unless he's more like very-non-Hall of Famer Frank Tanana. Let the Baseball Rabbi help you figure out which is more accurate. Plus: Mike Trout seems to have picked up a brand new skill that makes him even greater than …
 
There's always next year, right? As the Red Sox join the Orioles around the bottom of the AL East, Pesach Wolicki uses Win Probability Added (WPA) to argue that something is seriously messed up with Boston's starting pitching... but the Reds, with an almost identical record, might start to surprise a lot of people despite last year's pitching disas…
 
The right fielder had the highest career value; the center fielder had the highest peak; but the left fielder is the guy who's in the Hall. Pesach and Scott take a closer look at the fascinating Red Sox outfield of 1975-1980, with a special focus on the great Freddie Lynn and his HOF-deserving-if-he-weren't-injured-so-much career. Plus: more on lin…
 
It's a well-known truism by now that baseball players are getting younger, and the Baseball Rabbi certainly agrees... kind of. According to Pesach Wolicki, baseball's aging curve is a little more complicated than the standard narrative would have you believe, and he and Scott Kahn try to identify the trends, and determine why there's an apparent di…
 
Everyone knows that stats after eleven games are meaningless... everyone, that is, but the Baseball Rabbi. Join Pesach and Scott as they look at storylines that seem to be developing (Jason Heyward learning how to hit, the Cubs forgetting how to pitch, and the Dodgers continued brilliance as a franchise), and investigate the connection between high…
 
With Opening Day behind us, the Baseball Rabbi says farewell to three potential Hall of Famers, and reviews their exceptional (and interesting) careers. Pesach Wolicki also reads a short selection from Bill James on the meaninglessness of baseball, and explains why this parodoxically is the secret source of its greatness. Scott Kahn anticipates who…
 
Imagine if there were a skill equivalent to hitting 40 home runs in a season... and no one ever noticed that someone was doing it. Believe it or not, that's how important catcher framing is to a baseball team, and the consequences of that realization are INSANE. (Welcome to the Hall, Brian McCann!) Plus: the Dodgers got worse but will have a better…
 
In the wake of Tom Seaver's announcement that he's retiring from public life, The Baseball Rabbi Podcast looks at his amazing career, and discusses where he ranks among pitchers all time. Pesach and Scott also analyze the new MLB rule changes - some good, some less so - and evaluate the NL East, where the Harper-free Nationals look ready to run awa…
 
The Baseball Rabbi, in our continuing series about underappreciated Hall of Fame candidates, discusses Scott Rolen, and why he kind of belongs and kind of doesn't. (He's basically Ron Santo, but not quite.) Meanwhile, the NL Central looks fascinating, with five decent teams fighting it out - including a much-improved Reds pitching staff, and a poss…
 
The American League West was baseball's best division last year in total WAR, but 2019 looks very, very different. The Athletics won't win 97 games again... unless they do (which will cause every sabermatrician to freak out). Meanwhile, the Angels are a little better, Seattle is a lot worse, Texas remains terrible, and the Astros are no longer a su…
 
The Baseball Rabbi explores yet another overlooked potential Hall of Famer: Tiger great Lou Whitaker. He may have been more valuable than Eddie Murray or Reggie Jackson... and he arguably also has a far weaker HOF argument than they do. (We'll explain.) We also look at the fascinating race destined to take place in the AL Central, where Cleveland's…
 
Many baseball fans think that Curt Schilling's exclusion from the Hall is a shame, and that like other borderline candidates, he should be taken more seriously by the voters. The Baseball Rabbi goes further: Schilling is not only a slam dunk candidate, but also one of the absolute greatest pitchers in history. Plus our AL East preview! (Spoiler ale…
 
When Robinson Cano was traded from the Mariners to the Mets, a lot of fans said, "Same old Mets, spending $120 million for the back end of a bad contract." But the Baseball Rabbi argues that there's more to this than meets the eye, and that both the Mets and the Mariners might be winners in this trade (which is something you don't hear every day). …
 
By acquiring James Paxton, Brian Cashman did something atypical for him: he traded away a top pitching prospect. Will this work out (which is usually the case with Cashman), or is this another Granderson mistake (yes, you read that correctly)? And when Mike Moustakas doesn't earn the big bucks he expects, will it be because of collusion? (Short ans…
 
In this special offseason wrap-up episode, Pesach Wolicki suggests that World Series winning teams have something in common that belies the common assumption that winning in the playoffs is a roll of the dice. He also gets passionately annoyed about Jacob deGrom's 5th place showing in the MVP race (but not because Christian Yelich was a bad choice)…
 
The Los Angeles Dodgers are talented enough that they won the NL Pennant - despite some serious missteps by Dave Roberts. Pesach Wolicki argues that while major parts of managing are hidden from the public, making it impossible for an outside observer to conclusively judge how the manager is doing, we nonetheless can evaluate his in-game tactics an…
 
Miguel Andujar might be the league's best rookie - and the Baseball Rabbi suggests trading him ASAP. Why do the Yankees have an Andujar dilemma, and what does that tell us about the changes in MLB over the past ten years? Meanwhile, Rico Petrocelli - or somebody - had the strangest career in baseball history by one very specific yardstick; Pesach W…
 
After striking out batter number 300, Max Scherzer gave a shout-out to Matt Wieters for being the best at catching foul tips... but Scherzer provided no evidence for his claim. Is he right? Can we measure it? More to the point, does it even matter? The Baseball Rabbi put stat guru Moshe Schorr on the case (because when Scherzer talks, it's worth pa…
 
The Oakland A's surprised everyone by winning 97 games with a relatively miniscule payroll, so is this Moneyball 2.0 - or a mirage? That leads Pesach Wolicki to a further discussion about the AL Central's role in making decent, mediocre, and even bad teams look like world beaters (with one obvious exception). The Baseball Rabbi also talks end of se…
 
Is Aaron Judge's career going to be like Ryan Howard's or Al Bumbry's? The Baseball Rabbi suggests that Yankee fans better hope for the latter - though history shows that such a positive outcome is very unlikely. Inspired by Joey Wendle, Pesach Wolicki analyzes old rookies, and what history shows about the length of their careers. He also answers S…
 
When Steve Phillips argued on MLB Radio that the Chicago Cubs don't run enough, the Baseball Rabbi, Pesach Wolicki, picked up the gauntlet and rose to the challenge. Through analysis of the Cubs' current baserunning prowess, Pesach analyzes whether Phillips is right or wrong, and then moves on to a general analysis of the overall value of stolen ba…
 
It's an old parlor game: compare Babe Ruth to Barry Bonds, or Lou Gehrig to Albert Pujols. We can calculate that the older players were generally greater than their peers in a way that modern greats are not; but the Baseball Rabbi, Pesach Wolicki, offers a new way of viewing the entire question which demonstrates that today's players are the best i…
 
Google login Twitter login Classic login