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What makes us human? How are we different from chimpanzees? Who are our earliest ancestors and how do we know? Origin Stories is The Leakey Foundation’s podcast about how we became human. This award-winning show combines science and narrative to explore our human story and explain why we are the way we are. Listen and explore human evolution one story at a time.
 
Future Ecologies is a podcast about relationships: between, within, amongst, and all around us. Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light – set to original music & immersive soundscapes, and weaving together interviews with expert knowledge holders.
 
This Week in Microbiology is a podcast about unseen life on Earth hosted by Vincent Racaniello and friends. Following in the path of his successful shows 'This Week in Virology' (TWiV) and 'This Week in Parasitism' (TWiP), Racaniello and guests produce an informal yet informative conversation about microbes which is accessible to everyone, no matter what their science background.
 
Biology is breaking out of the lab and clinic—and into our daily lives. Our new ability to engineer biology is transforming not just science, research, and healthcare, but how we produce our food, the materials we use, how we manufacture, and much, much more. From the latest scientific advances to the biggest trends, this show explores all the ways biology is today where the computing revolution was 50 years ago: on the precipice of revolutionizing our world in ways we are only just beginnin ...
 
Hi kids, if you think that animals are amazing, this is the show for you! Join host Earth Ranger Emma as she travels the world to discover the wildest animal facts out there and solve nature’s biggest mysteries. With top ten countdowns, an animal guessing game, conservation conversations, and epic animal showdowns, this is a journey you won’t want to miss! To learn more, visit earthrangers.com/podcast
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and providing in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
 
On The DarkHorse Podcast, we will explore questions that matter, with tools that work. Weekly episodes of "The Evolutionary Lens" are co-hosted with Heather Heying, in which we use an evolutionary toolkit to reveal patterns in nature--including human nature. Other episodes will feature Bret hosting long form discussions. Some guests will be well known, others obscure, but all of them are chosen because they have demonstrated unusual insight. The state and future of civilization will be a rec ...
 
New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Maddie Sofia for science on a different wavelength.
 
Editors in Conversation is the official podcast of the American Society for Microbiology Journals. Editors in Conversation features discussions between ASM Journals Editors, researchers and clinicians working on the most cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences. Topics include laboratory diagnosis and clinical treatment of infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, epidemiology of infections, multidrug-resistant organisms, pharmacology of antimicrobial agents, susceptibility testing ...
 
Zoo Logic with animal trainer, zoo advocate, and ZOOmility author, Dr. Grey Stafford, is a weekly conversation with zoo, aquarium, and animal experts about Nature, wildlife, pets, animal training with positive reinforcement, health and welfare, research, conservation, and education, sustainability, zoo politics, activism and legislation, and all things animals! On Zoo Logic, we’ll go behind the scenes with animal professionals and influencers from around the world to explore the latest Zoos ...
 
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show series
 
TWiM explains how Vibrio biofilms are dispersed by polyamine signals, and the induction of inappetence by respiratory virus infection which causes alteration of the gut microbiome. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Regulation of Vibrio bio…
 
The development of β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors seems to be expanding rapidly and promise to be the best short-term strategy against the most recalcitrant Gram-negative pathogens. In this podcast, we will discuss the current state of the art in this field. Objectives: • Discuss how the discovery of β-lactam/β-lactam inhibitors has evolved • Revi…
 
A Beetle’s Chemical (And Plastic) Romance For many species of beetle, the key to finding a mate is scent: Both females and males give off pheromones that signal their species, their sex, and even their maturity level. How do researchers know? In experiments with dead beetles that have been sprayed with female pheromones, live males reliably attempt…
 
Weighing COVID-19 Vaccinations For Teens Federal officials are reporting that the Food and Drug Administration is poised to authorize Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 12 to 15 by early next week—just as Canada became the first country to do so on Wednesday of this week. Pfizer has said they will seek out emergency authorization for even …
 
In surprise news this week, the US government announced its support for waiving patent protections for COVID-19 vaccines, in an effort to boost supplies around the world.As fewer than 1% of people living in low-income countries have received COVID-19 vaccines, it is hoped that this move is a major step towards addressing this inequity by allowing m…
 
Could a vaccine for specific forms of cancer be a realistic prospect in the future? Based upon research into rhythms in the body, research shows that it may be a viable possibility. Press play to learn: If the time cancer treatment is administered can make a difference Can the sequence or timing of vaccines cause variation in efficacy? How the body…
 
The numbers are staggering. India has been reporting more than 300,000 COVID-19 cases each day for the past two weeks, and recently topped more than 400,000 cases in a single day, a global record. Many more cases are likely unreported. NPR International Correspondent Lauren Frayer shares the latest from India. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.…
 
Facts About ! Credits: Executive Producer: Chris Krimitsos Voice, Editor, and Post-Producer: Jimmy Murray "Winner Winner!" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Facts from Wikipedia Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License…
 
In celebration of Star Wars week, this episode of Weirdhouse Cinema explores one of the many films that sought to cash in on the popularity of George Lucas’ 1977 classic. Behold, 1979’s “The Humanoid,” an Italian space opera starring Richard Kiel, Barbara Bach and a whole lot of stuff that looks like Star Wars. Learn more about your ad-choices at h…
 
Sleep is one of the defining traits of human life. It's also one of the most mysterious. Dr. Horacio de la Iglesia is a neurobiologist who's on a quest to understand how patterns of human sleep evolved. His new research shows an unexpected connection between sleep and the cycles of the moon. Send us your questions! Have a question about human evolu…
 
This week's special All Creatures Kids podcast we introduce Archer. Archer is 10 and lives in Colorado. HIs dream is one day to work with wildlife as a zoologist. In this episode he tells us everything he knows about the Tamandua. If you have your own kid expert and wanting to be featured on our All Creatures Kids episodes please email Angie at all…
 
Can selection act on ecosystems, societies, or planets such that some persist and others disappear? Must such systems reproduce to evolve? On this episode of Big Biology, we talk to Tim Lenton, Director of the Global Systems Institute (@GSI_Exeter) and a Professor of Climate Change and Earth System Science at the University of Exeter. In his 2021 T…
 
“The anthropomorphic language has been frowned upon in biology for a hundred years…and I think it’s because it’s the only way to understand it,” says Perry Marshall. Press play to learn more about his compelling view of cancer and discover: How Perry’s understanding of cancer might explain why stage four cancers are almost always impossible to trea…
 
In this week’s episode, we will review a prospective study suggesting that eculizumab discontinuation based on complement genetics is a reasonable and safe strategy in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, examine a study that provides new insights into resistance mechanisms and immune evasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and…
 
In celebration of May the 4th, this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind ventures into a galaxy far, far away while also considering the science and biology of our home world. Join Robert and Joe as they break down six fantastic alien species from the Star Wars universe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
What happens when a classically trained medical doctor develops chronic fatigue? When Jeanne Drisko struggled with her health, she discovered integrative medicine and nutrition. Now she’s running a clinic at the University of Kansas with Dr. Kay Chin utilizing translational medicine to unlock better care for cancer patients. Listen and learn What’s…
 
What if you could answer a few questions and have a relatively good idea of what your gut needs to be healthy? And what if that test was based on countless data points that are now decipherable through the power of big data analysis? (Hint: it’s possible and FREE!) Tune in to hear about the science behind guttesting.com. Leave Us A Rating And Revie…
 
Katie Clapp and Michael Tranfaglia's son was born with a genetic disorder that affects brain development. It makes it hard to learn language and basic daily tasks and often is accompanied by a host of other disorders. To help find a cure, they started a foundation and raised research money. After several setbacks, one treatment is showing promise. …
 
For the past several years, scientists have been tracking the stony coral tissue loss disease that is rapidly destroying corals as it spreads across the Florida Reef Tract. To preserve coral species, a consortium of public and private organizations has formed the Florida Coral Rescue Center (FCRC). The FCRC is the newest and largest member of a nat…
 
TWiV examines the claim by Brazil’s ANVISA that the Sputnik vaccine contains replication-competent adenovirus, and a role for the furin cleavage site in SARS-CoV-2 spike for efficient reproduction in the respiratory tract, evasion of antiviral IFITM proteins, and transmission in ferrets. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Su…
 
In this episode we speak with Dr. Jason Slot, Associate Professor at Ohio State University, who is a mycologist currently studying the evolution of psilocybin production in Fungi. The last half hour of the conversation focuses largely on mycorrhizal fungi. Some fascinating stuff in this conversation. For more info or to read more about the evolutio…
 
How do doctors measure your liver function, kidney function, cholesterol levels, and heart disease? They use biomarkers, and David Wishart helps identify biomarkers with analytical chemistry, mass spectrometry, and other bioinformatics tools. He and his colleagues look at blood or urine and other biological fluids to help in the diagnosis and chara…
 
The earliest evidence of deliberate human burial in Africa, and a metal-free rechargeable battery. Listen to our mini-series ‘Stick to the Science’: when science gets political and vote for the show in this year’s Webby Awards. In this episode: 00:44 Human burial practices in Stone Age Africa The discovery of the burial site of a young child in a K…
 
Jim Corbett was not your typical rancher. Over the course of decades roaming the borderlands of the desert southwest, he developed a practice that he referred to as 'goatwalking' - a form of prophetic wandering and desert survival based on goat-human symbiosis. For Jim, 'goatwalking' provided both physical and spiritual sustenance, and allowed him …
 
How should cancer be viewed while in the body. Research shows that it may be classified as a separate entity rather than a component of tissue. Listen in to learn: The percentage of cells that do not metastasize How tumors coerce the surrounding healthy tissue to serve its needs How "clusters of death" interact with populations around the world Chr…
 
For links to every news story, all of the details we shared about Chialingosaurus, and our fun fact check out https://iknowdino.com/Chialingosaurus-Episode-336/ To get access to lots of patron only content check out https://www.patreon.com/iknowdino Dinosaur of the day Chialingosaurus, a potentially dubious small stegosaur with long front legs. Int…
 
We jump back to New Zealand to cover one of the most unique animals on our planet, the Tuatara. This is a true living fossil. They are the last of their kind, from an ancient order of reptiles, that has survived nearly 240 million years. Because they were isolated on New Zealand for nearly 85 million years, Tuataras survived mass extinctions and ha…
 
We've been talking a lot about COVID in the US. Now, we want to look at how things are going in some other countries. NPR's correspondents — Jason Beaubien, Phil Reeves, and Anthony Kuhn — talk with Morning Edition's Noel King about why most of the world is struggling to get even a small percentage of their population vaccinated. Have questions abo…
 
Planet’s haunted guys! From ghostly worms, to eight-armed specters, to ghost bats far scarier than any vampire, we’ve got a passion for possession when it comes to these cute hauntings! Discover this and more as we answer the age old question: what are ghost dogs with Bridget Greenberg. Footnotes: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ikmVakjOrOSpD-9…
 
Facts About ! Credits: Executive Producer: Chris Krimitsos Voice, Editor, and Post-Producer: Jimmy Murray "Winner Winner!" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Facts from Wikipedia Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License…
 
Today, women represent approximately 22 percent of the AI workforce. But IBM is out to change that by increasing diversity not just in hiring but through programs such as Women Leaders in AI that celebrate diversity in the field. In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm Gladwell talks to IBM’s new SVP & CMO, Carla Piñeyro Sublett, and Chimka Munkhba…
 
Can the aging process actually be reversed or prevented? The answer to this age-old question is explored in today’s show. Tune in to learn: What changes about the way DNA is read as we get older, and how this could hold the key to reversing cellular aging What differs between old and young tissues, and why they heal differently Whether it’s the los…
 
Frogs: invasive menace, and victim. We look at two papers showing how frogs are fairing in the face of human-caused species invasions. One where the frog is the invader, another where the frogs are facing down a novel threat –mongooses. Species of the Bi-week is a wee salamander from Japan. Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights F…
 
One of the biggest challenges is identifying kidney disease in the early and middle stages, says Prabir Roy-Chaudhury. He works to emphasize the importance of simple blood and urine tests for high-risk populations for earlier diagnosis, but also strives for better treatment once kidney failure sets in. He discusses Why his main interest is dialysis…
 
Neuroscientists have long been trying to determine what happens in the brain during sleep, but to date, they have overlooked a key player: astrocytes. These star-shaped cells were once thought to be the glue that held the brain together, but we are now beginning to appreciate their importance in a variety of brain functions. In this episode, host L…
 
The rate of vaccination in the U.S. continues to slow. Maddie Sofia talks with NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey about that and what can be done to get more people vaccinated. Also, making sense of the CDC's latest mask guidance. Have questions about the latest coronavirus headlines? Email us at shortwave@npr.org and we might cover it on a fu…
 
In celebration of May the 4th, this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind ventures into a galaxy far, far away while also considering the science and biology of our home world. Join Robert and Joe as they break down six fantastic alien species from the Star Wars universe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Are chemicals in your immediate environment the cause for specific adverse health implications of which you may have been previously unaware? Research shows that there may be a link between toxins common in objects in your home and ailments like cancer or other chronic diseases. Listen in to learn: How plasticizers affect brain development The toxi…
 
Today, NPR's mental health correspondent Rhitu Chatterjee guests hosts Short Wave. She talks to Dr. Arghavan Salles about burnout among health care workers — what it looks like, what it's doing to the mental health of doctors and nurses and how institutions can address it. Have a scientific question you can't stop thinking about? Drop us a line at …
 
Facts About ! Credits: Executive Producer: Chris Krimitsos Voice, Editor, and Post-Producer: Jimmy Murray "Winner Winner!" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Facts from Wikipedia Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License…
 
This week let’s learn about a couple of dangerous birds of New Guinea! They’re not what you might think. Join our mailing list! Further Reading/Watching: How Dangerous Are Cassowaries, Really? Inside the Cassowary’s Casque Breakfast Club Ep. 34: Jack Dumbacher on Poisonous Birds (a long video but a really great deep dive into the pitohui) The might…
 
This episode: Single-celled eukaryotes can thrive without oxygen with the help of bacterial endosymbionts that respire nitrate the way our mitochondria respire oxygen! Thanks to Jon Graf for his contribution! Download Episode (12.4 MB, 18.1 minutes) Show notes: Microbe of the episode: Brenneria salicis News item 1 / News item 2 Takeaways The combin…
 
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