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The Cold War, Prohibition, the Gold Rush, the Space Race. Every part of your life - the words you speak, the ideas you share - can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories that made America? We'll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our nation. And we'll show you how our history affected them, their families and affects you today. Hosted by Lindsay Graham (not the Senator). From Wondery, the network behind American Scandal, Tides of Histo ...
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Award-winning real stories of the Cold War told by those who were there. Every week we interview an eyewitness of the Cold War. Across soldiers, spies, civilians, and others, we aim to cover the whole range of Cold War experiences. Hosts Ian Sanders, James Chilcott, and Peter Ryan bring your ears into the heart of the Cold War. Reading a history book is one thing, but hearing a human voice, with every breath, hesitation and intonation brings a whole new dimension to understanding what it was ...
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Become a Paid Subscriber: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/siliconcurtain/subscribe A podcast about propaganda, digital disinformation, politics, corruption, hybrid warfare, weaponised conspiracy theories, social echo chambers and digital dystopias. 1984, Authoritarian, Autocracy, Autocrat, Big Brother, Brainwashing, Cold war, Cold war propaganda, Communism, Conflict, Conspiracy theories, Control, Cults, Cyber warfare, Deception, Dictator, Dictatorship, Digital dystopia, Digital media ...
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Each season, Secrets We Keep investigates a different Australian secret. Shame Lies & Family: A mystery photo of Amelia Oberhardt’s mum exposes the practice of shotgun marriages, forced adoption, and quiet abortions carried out in Australia until the 1980s Nest of Traitors: Joey Watson is pulled into the world of espionage, attempting to track down an Australian spy who turned to work for the enemy during the Cold War
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Unclear and Present Danger

Jamelle Bouie and John Ganz

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New York Times columnist Jamelle Bouie and freelance writer John Ganz delve into the world of 90s post-Cold War thrillers with Unclear and Present Danger, a podcast that explores America in an age of transition to lone superpower, at once triumphant and unsure of its role in the world.
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Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
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This podcast seeks to learn what war teaches. There has been a steady decline in the study of military history and its associated theoretical discipline, strategy.This podcast seeks to fill that gap through in-depth interviews on military and diplomatic history. Our guests have included former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the Cold War historian John Lewis Gaddis, and China Select Committee chairman Mike Gallagher. We discuss the battlefield commanders, diplomats, strategists, policymakers ...
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The Eastern Border

Kristaps Andrejsons

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A podcast about the politics and the history of the eastern Europe - including, but not limited to the current state of Russia, politics of the EU, history of the USSR and the region in general. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/theeasternborder. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
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Brainwashed investigates the CIA’s covert mind control experiments – from the Cold War and MKULTRA to the so-called War on Terror. It’s the story of how a renowned psychiatrist used his unwitting patients as human guinea pigs at a Montreal hospital, and the ripple effects on survivors, their families, and thousands of other people around the world. It also examines the cultural impact — how the CIA brought LSD to America and inadvertently created counterculture influencers such as author Ken ...
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Zone 7 with Sheryl McCollum

iHeartPodcasts and CrimeOnline

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Work a cold case alongside investigator Sheryl “Mac” McCollum, Director of the Cold Case Investigative Research Institute. Every week, Sheryl dives into her cold case files alongside accomplished guests to look for clues into unsolved murders, missing people, and more. This ain’t just a podcast but a war room. Sheryl opens her cold case files, her heart and her little black book! You will quickly realize Zone 7 is not a place but a lifestyle!
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The Unconventional Soldier

theunconventionalsoldier

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”Letting the guest tell the story”. A military podcast by former soldiers from the British Army’s long range Surveillance and Reconnaissance Patrols unit. Our first series covers the inception of the unit with its founder Major General Anthony Stone CB, the selection of the soldiers, the unique ”stay behind” role during the Cold War, the multiple operational tours they deployed on over the last 40 years finishing on an interview with the current serving officer commanding the unit.In subsequ ...
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The Cold War rages in the back rooms and dark alleys of 1970s Prague—and on one misty night an American discovers that the city and its spies have become the new front of another, more ancient war—a war of magic. Now a CIA agent and a KGB operative must forge an uneasy alliance in order to stop a secret occult society from destroying the world. When spies and sorcerers cross murky lines to do battle for home and country—who do you trust? The Witch Who Came in from The Cold is a Realm product ...
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This brand new pop culture history podcast is nothing like anything you've heard before, and it's everything you need to understand the modern world. Katie Puckrik and Tom Fordyce, an American pop culture buff and a British music lover, have taken the smash-hit song by Billy Joel and turned it into a podcast. Billy lists 120 people, places, and things in 'We Didn't Start The Fire', and Katie and Tom will do an episode on every single one to create the most fascinating, random and original hi ...
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Dive into GeoRumor 🌍🎙️, where history's echoes and today's whispers meet. The lands are ancient, from Israel & Palestine 🇮🇱🇵🇸. They are the origins of war 🔥. Then, there are the dark tales of Russian roulette 🎰 and the sprawling empire of Russia 🇷🇺. Explore how England 🇬🇧 and the UK's past shape our world. Unravel the deepest conspiracy theories 🕵️‍♂️💣 of war. Learn why the Cold War was icy. Hear the silent fear of graveyards and the complex history of Ukraine and Russia. Delve into why the ...
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“Leadership is a People Business.” That's the philosophy of this leadership podcast from Jon Rennie. It's real-world, actionable advice from Jon as well as his expert guests. As a former Cold War Submarine Officer who spent 22 years leading businesses in Corporate America before starting his own manufacturing business, he knows that leadership matters!
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Admiralty Blues

Admiralty Blues

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Welcome to Admiralty Blues, an actual-play podcast of Beam Saber (by Austin Ramsay) - a Forged in the Dark sci-fi game with mechs! Many battles waged on the planet Sirvon’s supercontinent have been fought with these giant machines, and the ongoing cold war has heated up again as unknown forces have wiped out the Admiralty’s communication network: the belligerent Vanguard pirates and the vengeful once-empire of Lorne have found their time to strike! Tasked with fixing the network is Mercury S ...
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Edited and produced sessions of Matryoshka, a cosmic horror investigation rpg set in the USSR during the Cold War. Each season is self-contained, but they all take place in the same continuity/world. If you're new, start with season 1 episode 1! The season 0 Matryoshka episodes are non-canonical. Music from each episode and credits for episode art are listed on redgametable.com For comments, questions, or just to talk, you can email me at utopologist@protonmail.com.
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From alleyway gangsters to cold war spies to eccentric entrepreneurs, Australian history is full of colourful but forgotten characters. Host Jen Kelly talks with experts, historians and yarn spinners to uncover the untold stories of some of our most interesting and offbeat ancestors.
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Is the post-Cold War era over? In this brave new world, nothing is too small, or big, to be digitalised…including acts of war. Russian ransomware attacks almost doubled last year. At this very moment, cybercriminals are crippling schools, supermarkets, dentists, kindergartens, hospitals, oil pipelines - all in the name of money. Katie Puckrik wants to know who, and why. You can listen to the previous series of dot com on this same feed. Series 1 unveils the hidden army of volunteers behind t ...
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Battle Lines

The Telegraph

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Across the world, from Europe to Asia, the Americas to the Middle East, tensions are rising between nation states. Traditional alliances and alignments are constantly evolving in the 21st century. An understanding of defence and security policy and the tides of political, social and economic changes is crucial for any informed understanding of our world. 2024 sees war in Europe and Israel, and elections in major economies, including the US, the UK, Taiwan, South Africa, and many others. Insu ...
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Cover Up is a series of investigative stories that take us on a journey into a world of subterfuge and secrecy—a world where the truth is concealed under a blanket of lies. From corrupt individuals to clandestine institutions, Cover Up exposes deceit, deception, and the abuse of power. SEASON 4: The Anthrax Threat In the wake of 9/11, a series of letters laced with a deadly powder called anthrax appeared on the desks of prominent journalists and politicians in New York City and Washington D. ...
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November 9, 2019, is the 30th anniversary of the day the Berlin Wall came crashing down, freeing East Germany from communism, and marking the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. But when did the Cold War start? Why does it matter 30 years later? Find out in this ten-part series, transport back in time, feel what it was like to live through the end of the Cold War, and understand why that struggle was a battle for civilization itself. Bill Whittle narrates this compelling series about t ...
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From Wondery and Goalhanger Podcasts, Afua Hirsch and Peter Frankopan tell the wild stories of some of the most extraordinary men and women ever to have lived – and ask whether they have the rep they deserve. Should Nina Simone’s role in the civil rights movement be more celebrated than it is? When you find out what Picasso got up to in his studio, can you still admire his art? Was Napoleon a hero or a tyrant - or both? (And, while we’re at it, was he even short?) Legacy is the show that loo ...
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The Latin American History Podcast aims to tell the story of Spanish and Portuguese America from its very beginnings up until the present day. Latin America’s history is home to some of the most exciting and unbelievable stories of adventure and exploration, and this podcast will tell these stories in all their glory. It will examine colonial society, slavery, and what life was like for the region’s inhabitants during this period. We will look at what caused the wars of independence, how the ...
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During the cold war, many events took place that made the war based arounf secrecy. They were being secretive either because they wanted to keep their people safe or they didn't want anyone to know about the fail of their projects. Cover art photo provided by David Sinclair on Unsplash: https://unsplash.com/@ayosake
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Nicaragua Must Survive: Sandinista Revolutionary Diplomacy in the Global Cold War (University of California Press, 2023) tells the story of the Sandinistas' innovative diplomatic campaign, which captured the imaginations of people around the globe and transformed Nicaraguan history at the tail end of the Cold War. The Sandinistas' diplomacy went fa…
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Timo takes us on a journey through the tumultuous events of the 1991 Soviet coup attempt, as experienced from the streets of the Baltic States. As the coup unfolds, Timo finds himself in Lithuania, planning to covertly visit the closed city of Kaliningrad. He shares the tension sharing a dining table with a Soviet officer, unknowingly on the eve of…
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In this Bonus episode of Battle Lines, The Telegraph's David Knowles speaks to Professor Sergrey Radchenko to discuss his upcoming book 'To Run The World: The Kremlin's Cold War Bid for Global Power'. Professor Radchenko's shares with us what he discovered about the psychology of the Kremlin's decision-making during the Cold War and what this can t…
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Joey meets a man who investigated ASIO in the 1970s, to find out what made the spy agency vulnerable to being infiltrated by the KGB. ASIO was directed to search for traitors, but the internal investigations were inconclusive. If you have any feedback or information about this story you can email secretswekeep@sca.com.au or you could send Joey a le…
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With the levers of power now in his control, Gorbachev steps out on the international stage with one aim: to avoid a nuclear war. He forges a new relationship with US President Reagan, but will it be enough to remove the shadow of armageddon? See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#…
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On September 2, 1945 Ho Chi Minh delivered a speech in Hanoi announcing Vietnam’s independence from Japan and France. Tonight we’re going to read the speech and add a little context in order to hear it from the “other side”. Ho Chi Minh was one of America’s communist boogeymen, after all. I believe hearing all sides, even ones you don’t like, are i…
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The marvellous, a key concept in literary debates at the turn of the seventeenth century, involved sensory and perspectival transformation, a rhetoric built on the unexpected, contradictory, and thought-provoking. The composer Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643) created a new practice in which the expressive materials of music and poetry were placed in …
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The ancient philosopher Diogenes--nicknamed "The Dog" and decried by Plato as a "Socrates gone mad"--was widely praised and idealized as much as he was mocked and vilified. A favorite subject of sculptors and painters since the Renaissance, his notoriety is equally due to his infamously eccentric behavior, scorn of conventions, and biting aphorisms…
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Cristina Brito's book Humans and Aquatic Animals in Early Modern America and Africa (Amsterdam University Press, 2024) deals with peoples' practices, perceptions, emotions and feelings towards aquatic animals, their ecosystems and nature on the early modern Atlantic coasts by addressing exploitation, use, fear, empathy, otherness, and indifference …
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The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw the turbulent end of China’s imperial system, violent revolutionary movements, and the fraught establishment of a republican government. During these decades of reform and revolution, millions of far-flung “overseas Chinese” remained connected to Chinese domestic movements. Transpacific Reform a…
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March 4, 1519. Hernán Cortés arrives in Mexico in search of the Aztec civilization and its wealth. You can listen ad-free in the Wondery or Amazon Music app. Or for all that and more, go to IntoHistory.com. History Daily is a co-production of Airship and Noiser. Go to HistoryDaily.com for more history, daily. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com…
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This week, Justin sits down with Ray Martinez. Ray served three consecutive terms as mayor of the city of Fort Collins, Colorado between 1999 and 2005. He was later elected to the Fort Collins City Council, serving a term from 2015 through 2019. Ray is an active member of several local advisory boards in the Fort Collins area. He's also the author …
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Only one performance style has dominated the lexicon of the casual moviegoer: “Method acting.” The first reception-based analysis of film acting, Imagining the Method: Reception, Identity, and American Screen Performance (U Texas Press, 2024) investigates how popular understandings of the so-called Method—what its author Justin Rawlins calls "metho…
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This is an ambitious history of flags, stamps, and currency—and the role they played in US imperialism over the 20th century. In Imperial Material: National Symbols in the US Colonial Empire (U Chicago Press, 2023), Alvita Akiboh, Assistant Professor of History at Yale University, reveals how US national identity has been created, challenged, and t…
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The Jewish Imperial Imagination: Leo Baeck and German-Jewish Thought (Cambridge UP, 2024) discusses the life and work of Leo Baeck (1873–1956) the rabbi, public intellectual, and the official leader of German Jewry during the Holocaust. The Jewish Imperial Imagination shows the myriad ways in which the German imperial enterprise left its imprint on…
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In World War II's Poland, thirty year old Zofia Sterner and her husband Wacek refuse to be classified as Jews destined for extermination. Instead, they evade the Nazis and the Soviets in several dramatic escapes and selflessly rescue many Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto and a labor camp, later becoming active participants in the Warsaw Uprising where t…
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For this week’s episode of the podcast, we watched director Brian De Palma’s 1996 adaptation of Mission: Impossible, starring Tom Cruise, Jon Voight, Henry Czerny (Kittridge!), Emmanuelle Béart, Jean Reno, Ving Rhames, Kristin Scott Thomas and Vanessa Redgrave. It was shot by frequent De Palma collaborator Stephen H. Burum and edited by Paul Hirsch…
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I’m joined by Steven Pemberton today, and we're talking about moving from the Corporate Grind to Entrepreneurship. After spending five and a half years working in corporate, Steven quit in 2020 and started his own business. Steven and his wife have built two 7-figure e-commerce businesses generating over $3 million in sales. Today they own and oper…
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Kristine M. McCusker's book Just Enough to Put Him Away Decent: Death Care, Life Extension, and the Making of a Healthier South, 1900-1955 (U Illinois Press, 2023) takes, as its focus, the combined history of death and health in the American South between 1900 and 1955. The text is ambitious in scope, and weaves together multiple oral histories to …
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In Comedy Book:: How Comedy Conquered Culture–and the Magic That Makes It Work (FSG, 2023), Jesse David Fox—the country’s most definitive voice in comedy criticism and someone who, in his own words, enjoys comedy “maybe more than anyone on this planet”—tackles everything you need to know about comedy, an art form that has been under-considered thro…
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How did men cope with sexual health issues in early modern England? In Men's Sexual Health in Early Modern England (Amsterdam University Press, 2023), Dr. Jennifer Evans presents a vivid history that investigates how sexual, reproductive, and genitourinary conditions were understood between 1580 and 1740. Drawing on medical sources and personal tes…
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Edition No37 | 01-03-2024 Ukrainian forces shot down the second Russian Su-34 attack plane in a single day on Feb. 27, the Air Force reported. The destruction of the jet is the latest in a recent uptick of downed Russian planes, including two A-50 early warning and control aircraft in the past two months, each costing around $330 million. There are…
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Dive deep into what is the history of Israel and Palestine with our special video. This isn't just another overview. It's a heartfelt journey through the land's bustling markets, ancient olive groves, and the decades of conflict that have shaped it. From the early 1900s, under the British Mandate, to the complex present, we explore the pivotal mome…
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Today I am speaking with a rare and special person – a Russian activist with an unambiguous, strong voice condemning the crimes and horrors being committed in Ukraine by Russia, and who is doing it with humour and passion. It has to be said, that he’s also taking on considerable risk in doing so. Fortunately, he’s also doing this in English, so you…
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Empires are one of the most common forms of political structure in history—yet no empire is alike. We have our “standard” view of empire: perhaps the Romans, or the China of the Qin and Han Dynasties—vast polities that cover numerous different people, knit together by strong institutions from a political center. But where do, say, the empires of th…
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Ryan Wolfson-Ford’s provocative new book, Forsaken Causes: Liberal Democracy and Anticommunism in Cold War Laos (U Wisconsin Press, 2024), is an intellectual history of Laos during the Cold War. The book challenges the established view that Cold War Laos was a plaything of foreign powers, particularly France, the United States, and North Vietnam. I…
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In the wake of 9/11, a handful of media and government workers started experiencing a troubling confluence of symptoms. Doctors couldn’t explain it, until they pinpointed the unlikely cause: exposure to anthrax. From Campside Media and Sony Music Entertainment, this is Season 4 of Cover Up: The Anthrax Threat. Unlock all episodes of Cover Up: The A…
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On this show Middle East correspondent in Jerusalem Nataliya Vasilyeva talks to Venetia Rainey about ongoing ceasefire talks and whether a deal is really as close as Joe Biden claimed. Then we hear from Jumana Shahin, a mother of one who is stuck in central Gaza and facing the hardest decision of her life: should she try to escape with her family o…
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In a world of border walls and obstacles to migration, a lottery where winners can gain permanent residency in the United States sounds too good to be true. Just as unlikely is the idea that the United States would make such visas available to foster diversity within a country where systemic racism endures. But in 1990, the United States Diversity …
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Japan is often imagined as a nation with a long history of whaling. In The Gods of the Sea: Whales and Coastal Communities in Northeast Japan, c.1600-2019 (Cambridge UP, 2023), Fynn Holm argues that for centuries some regions in early modern Japan did not engage in whaling. In fact, they were actively opposed to it, even resorting to violence when …
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In 1817, in a region of the eastern coast of British India then known as Cuttack, a group of Paiks, the area's landed militia, began agitating against the East India Company's government, burning down government buildings and looting the treasury. While the attacks were initially understood as an attempt to return the territory's native ruler to po…
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In An Empire of Laws: Legal Pluralism in British Colonial Policy (Yale University Press, 2023), Dr. Christian R. Burset presents a compelling reexamination of how Britain used law to shape its empire. For many years, Britain tried to impose its own laws on the peoples it conquered, and English common law usually followed the Union Jack. But the com…
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What do you hear at the bottom of the ocean? How does it feel to swim with whales? Or make friends with an octopus? Come and find out. This is Life Under Water. Wildlife filmmaker and TV personality Hannah Stitfall wants to take you the world below the waves. She’ll be chatting to freedivers, marine biologists, submarine pilots and more, hearing mi…
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What do you hear at the bottom of the ocean? How does it feel to swim with whales? Or make friends with an octopus? Come and find out. This is Life Under Water. Wildlife filmmaker and TV personality Hannah Stitfall wants to take you the world below the waves. She’ll be chatting to freedivers, marine biologists, submarine pilots and more, hearing mi…
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Kostiantyn Koshelenko has created a unique book, on management in times of war. The book emerged not by choice but by necessity, following Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February 2022. From the beginning of the chaos of war, Kostiantyn felt compelled to record his thoughts and observations. It grew to become a collection of reflections …
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Today, I’m joined by Monica Elgemark, and we're talking about how to Unlock the Secrets of Effective Leadership. Monica is based in Sweden and has more than 20 years of leadership experience within the B2B and B2C markets in the Nordic region. Her work has covered several companies and industries at the forefront of change and market disruption. Sh…
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A KGB defector directs Joey towards a former British politician. Joey investigates and finds the names of four potential moles who operated inside ASIO during the Cold War. He begins searching for the four suspects. If you have any feedback or information about this story you can email secretswekeep@sca.com.au or you could send Joey a letter GPO Bo…
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In this Legends episode of "Zone 7," Crime Scene Investigator Sheryl McCollum sits down with Joseph Twilley to discuss his career with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), protecting Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and assets around the world through criminal and counterintelligence investigations. They discuss competitive recruiting a…
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A cylinder of baked graphite and clay in a wood case, the pencil creates as it is being destroyed. To love a pencil is to use it, to sharpen it, and to essentially destroy it. Pencils were used to sketch civilization's greatest works of art. Pencils were there marking the choices in the earliest democratic elections. Even when used haphazardly to m…
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What is the history of Israel and Palestine? This question takes us back to the late 19th century with the rise of Zionism, aiming for a Jewish homeland, and led to the establishment of Israel in 1948, sparking conflicts and displacing many Palestinians. The quest for peace is complicated by issues like Israeli settlements, the status of Jerusalem,…
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In December 1937, the Chinese capital, Nanjing, falls and the Japanese army unleash an orgy of torture, murder, and rape. Over the course of six weeks, hundreds of thousands of civilians and prisoners of war are killed. At the very onset of the atrocities, the Danish supervisor at a cement plant just outside the city, 26-year-old Bernhard Arp Sindb…
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In Immeasurable Weather: Meteorological Data and Settler Colonialism from 1820 to Hurricane Sandy (Duke UP, 2023), Sara J. Grossman explores how environmental data collection has been central to the larger project of settler colonialism in the United States. She draws on an extensive archive of historical and meteorological data spanning two centur…
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