show episodes
 
Environmental Studies and Sciences is a podcast covering some of the latest research on environmental issues and hot topics in the environmental field, with leading academics and upcoming environmental researchers. The podcast is produced by Speak Up for Blue Productions on behalf of the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences, and the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences. The host is Dr. Chris Parsons.
 
A place to learn about geology for teachers, students, rock hounds, and geology enthusiasts. Gary Lewis is an Australian-born geologist who loves to share his passion for all things 'geology'. In the GEO podcast, Gary takes you on a journey to learn about rocks, minerals, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers and so much more. It does not matter if you have no experience in geology, Gary will help you to understand the fundamentals of our planet so you can have a greater understanding about when ...
 
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show series
 
We're back with a brand new series of the 'Oxford Sparks Big Questions Podcast'! And - in the Autumn of 2020 - where else could we start but with an episode answering a big question related to COVID-19? We're all used to hearing a lot of pandemic terminology now, but it can be difficult to get to grips with exactly what all these terms mean. For in…
 
In the second of two episodes linked to the association for Environmental Studies & Sciences annual conference, Dr Chris Parsons chats to the award winners at this year’s conference. First of all, Hanna Morris, the student award winner, discusses her groundbreaking research on public attitudes to The Green New Deal. Dr. Susan Caplow, the winner of …
 
In the first of two interviews linked to the association for Environmental Studies & Sciences annual conference, Dr. Chris Parsons chats with the conference’s keynote speaker Dr. Myra Young Armstead about her plenary speech “Unleashing the Power of an Interdisciplinary Landscape, Environmental Studies”. In addition, they chat about a host of other …
 
We all feel pain differently. What to one person may be the worst pain in the world, might be a mild irritation to another person; but why? At the moment, we don’t have a thorough understanding of how pain is processed, meaning it is difficult to devise treatments for chronic pain. In this episode of the ‘Big Questions’ podcast, we are lucky enough…
 
In this episode, I talk with Dr. Chris Spencer from Travelling Geologist and Queens College about how he become involved i geology and why understanding our planet is so important. Chris is a co-leader on some of the GEOetc Field Experiences..and an amazing human. Your students will get a lot out of listening to Chris. Interested in joining us on a…
 
In this episode, I talk about four things a college/university student (or anyone who wants to) can do to get some field experience. With college/universities not requiring as much fieldwork - many not even running field camps or trips - these four things could help you build up your field experience and get ahead of the pack when applying for a ge…
 
Things have changed a lot over the past few months – including, for many of us, our daily routine. But how has this impacted our energy usage? In this week’s episode of the Big Questions podcast, we chat to Dr Philipp Grünewald from Oxford’s Environmental Change Institute about his ‘JoyMeter’ survey, which has given a fascinating insight into how o…
 
In this episode, I talk about how volcanoes get different shapes due to the chemistry of the molten rock materials. We talk about the shield, composite/stratiform and caldera volcanoes...and a little about cinder cones. We mention silicate chemistry and the effect of water on shapes and eruption style. This is a great primer to volcanoes! Intereste…
 
Established in 1621, the Oxford Botanic Garden was the first botanic garden in the UK. It has been - and remains – an invaluable resource for education, scientific research, and conservation. But recently it’s added another feather to its cap, teaming up with The Oxford Artisan Distillery to produce a ‘Physic Gin’. So what exactly is this gin, and …
 
In this episode, I talk about the geological and topographic features of transform fault boundaries between two tectonic plates. This is a great summary for students learning about Plate Tectonics. If you want a summary of the theory - you can find a podcast episode that covers the theory here. If you want a booklet covering the theory and evidence…
 
In this episode, I talk about the geological and topographic features of three types of convergent plate boundaries - subduction, collision, and island arcs. We cover earthquakes, volcanoes, deep ocean trenches, mountain building, and more. This is a great summary for students learning about Plate Tectonics. If you want a summary of the theory - yo…
 
In this episode, I talk about the geological and topographic features of divergent plate boundaries, including rift valleys, Mid Ocean Ridges (MORs), normal faults, transform faults, and the ages of rocks moving away from the boundaries. This is a great summary for students learning about Plate Tectonics. If you want a summary of the theory - you c…
 
As we search for a way out of the global coronavirus crisis, there’s been plenty of discussion surrounding a potential COVID-19 tracing app. Many of us carry a mobile phone with us wherever we go, so it seems logical to use this pre-existing infrastructure in the transition towards a ‘new normal’. But how tricky is it to make such an app? What’s mo…
 
In this episode, I talk about the science of Tsunamis - those horrifying waves that spread around the oceans after certain geological events. What are those events? How do the waves travel? How can we warn people? What if I am on the coast - what should I look for? If you want a classroom activity, have a go at constructing this 3D paper tsunami mo…
 
Just one mosquito bite is enough to infect someone with malaria. Tackling this serious – sometimes fatal – subtropical disease is a key priority for the World Health Organisation; but how can we move forward in the fight against it? Specifically, how could a small team of researchers, taking to the roads in a custom-built ‘Landrover Lab’, help in t…
 
In this episode, I talk about solution (Limestone/marble) caves and how they form. What is the chemistry behind their formation and their cave formations like stalactites and stalagmites? In fact, I mention the chemical equation that drives this reaction...click here to see it. Caves are fascinating places, and I hope this makes it easier for you t…
 
In this episode, we chat about the Earth's magnetic field and how that is recorded in igneous rocks. We discuss how this was worked out, how it was used to plot Apparent Polar Wandering Curves, and how we use magnetic stripes recorded in the rocks of the seafloor as evidence for Plate Tectonics. And quite a bit more... Interested in joining us on a…
 
Much less is known about the Indian Ocean than either the Atlantic or Pacific. It's also the least protected. What secrets lie beneath the waves? What new species wait to be discovered…? Dr Paris Stefanoudis tells us all about the Nekton project, its past and planned missions, and the role it’s playing in helping us to find out “What’s in the India…
 
In this episode, I talk about the differences between a mineral occurrence, a mineral deposit, and an ore deposit. And most of that is about the finances (profit and loss) of mining that resources than about the geology. This is a great primer for teaching students about mineral resources or to understand what these terms mean if you see them on a …
 
We’re living in extraordinary times, where graphs and statistics are splashed across newspaper front pages, and misinformation is rife. How do we know which sources of information are reliable? How do scientific researchers go from having an idea to publishing their findings, and advising on policy? In this week’s episode of the ‘Big Questions’ pod…
 
How does a geologist work out the sequence of events when looking at outcrop? How do uniformitarianism, superposition, fossil sequences, and cross-cutting relationships all tie together to work out what came first and what came last? This episode I talk through the processes for sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks and structures like faults,…
 
When it comes to mass-producing food, it’s important to make sure the taste is consistent, and good! But how can we detect the taste of something without eating it ourselves? Prof Richard Compton and his team in the Department of Chemistry are experts in electrochemical sensors, and in this episode of the Big Questions podcast he tells us all about…
 
Today we talk about places you can go to start collecting rocks and minerals - and they are all places close to you home. When starting off you just don't have to go far or to famous places, but you can look in your backyard, front driveway, or local parks. Gary then explains what he takes into the field when he collects - to bring his treasures ho…
 
Coronavirus has been hitting the headlines since late 2019, and is now at the forefront of many people’s minds. We have a lot of questions, and it can be difficult to find answers. In this episode of the Big Questions podcast, Emily is asking her family what they would like to know about coronavirus, and Prof Christl Donnelly (an expert in modellin…
 
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