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StarTalk Radio

Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Science, pop culture, and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and Director of New York's Hayden Planetarium, and his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities, and scientific experts explore astronomy, physics, and everything else there is to know about life in the universe. New episodes premiere Tuesdays. Keep Looking Up!
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Mayim Bialik’s Breakdown is a quirky, informative, and interactive podcast breaking down the myths and misunderstandings about mental health and emotional well-being. Neuroscientist Mayim Bialik combines her academic background with vast personal experience to provide listeners with valuable practical advice focusing on removing the stigma surrounding mental health and encouraging an understanding of the mind-body connection. Nothing is off limits as Mayim breaks it down with an amazing coll ...
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Epic space stories. Season 1: the first Moon landing, Apollo 11. Season 2: the near disaster of Apollo 13. Coming soon: Season 3, the space shuttle. Theme music: Hans Zimmer and Christian Lundberg for Bleeding Fingers Music.
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The Science of Birds is a lighthearted exploration of bird biology. It's a fun resource for any birder or naturalist who wants to learn more about ornithology. Impress your birding friends at cocktail parties with all of your new bird knowledge! Hosted by Ivan Phillipsen, a passionate naturalist with a PhD in Zoology.
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You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

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You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology that celebrates science and self delusion. In each episode, we explore what we've learned so far about reasoning, biases, judgments, and decision-making.
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Weekly reading of National Geographic Magazine produced by Radio Eye under the Chafee Amendment to the Copyright Act which states that authorized entities that are governmental or nonprofit organizations whose primary mission is to provide copyrighted works in specialized formats to blind or disabled people. By continuing to listen, you verify you have an eligible print-reading disability.
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NASA's Curious Universe

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

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Our universe is a wild and wonderful place. Join NASA astronauts, scientists and engineers on a new adventure each episode — all you need is your curiosity! First time space explorers welcome. NASA's Curious Universe is an official NASA podcast. Discover more adventures with NASA experts at nasa.gov/curiousuniverse
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Raising Health

Andreessen Horowitz

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A myriad of AI, science, and technology experts explore the real challenges and enormous opportunities facing entrepreneurs who are building the future of health. Raising Health, a podcast by a16z Bio + Health and hosted by Kris Tatiossian and Olivia Webb, dives deep into the heart of biotechnology and healthcare innovation. Join veteran company builders, operators, and investors Vijay Pande, Julie Yoo, Vineeta Agarwala, and Jorge Conde, along with distinguished guests like Mark Cuban, Greg ...
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Houston We Have a Podcast

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

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From Earth orbit to the Moon and Mars, explore the world of human spaceflight with NASA each week on the official podcast of the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Listen to in-depth conversations with the astronauts, scientists and engineers who make it possible.
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Completely Arbortrary

Completely Arbortrary

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Tree advocate Casey Clapp and his tree-curious friend Alex Crowson bring you a podcast about trees and other related topics. History, culture, art, religion, science... trees affect and are affected by everything. Join Casey and Alex on their silly and educational journey to prove it.
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Spacepod

Carrie Nugent

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Hear stories about the alien moons orbiting our Sun, of cold stars, and the future of space exploration. Every week, scientist Dr. Carrie Nugent chats about an amazing part of our universe with an expert guest. Spacepod is the podcast that gives you an inside look into space exploration. Learn more: http://listentospacepod.com
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Species

mackenmurphy.org

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"The host, Macken Murphy, is able to condense vast chunks of information into engaging and digestible episodes. Fact-filled and fun." — The New York Times
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Why This Universe?

Dan Hooper, Shalma Wegsman

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The biggest ideas in physics, broken down. Join theoretical physicist Dan Hooper and co-host Shalma Wegsman as they answer your questions about dark matter, black holes, quantum mechanics, and more. Part of The University of Chicago Podcast Network.
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Huberman Lab discusses neuroscience — how our brain and its connections with the organs of our body control our perceptions, our behaviors, and our health. We also discuss existing and emerging tools for measuring and changing how our nervous system works. Andrew Huberman, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist and tenured professor in the department of neurobiology, and by courtesy, psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford School of Medicine. He has made numerous significant contributions to the ...
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What would happen if you fell into a black hole? How big is the universe? Just what the heck is a quasar, anyway? You've got questions, and astrophysicist Paul Sutter has the answers! Submit questions via Twitter using #AskASpaceman or post to facebook.com/PaulMattSutter. Every week you will come closer to COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE!
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The Matt Walker Podcast is all about sleep, the brain, and the body. Matt is a Professor of Neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of the book, Why We Sleep and has given a few TED talks. Matt is an awkward British nerd who adores science and the communication of science to the public.
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Big Biology

Art Woods, Cam Ghalambor, and Marty Martin

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The biggest biology podcast for the biggest science and biology fans. Featuring in-depth discussions with scientists tackling the biggest questions in evolution, genetics, ecology, climate, neuroscience, diseases, the origins of life, psychology and more. If it's biological, groundbreaking, philosophical or mysterious you'll find it here. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/bigbiology/support
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Join David and Will as they explore the paleontologists’ perspective on various topics in life and earth history. Each episode features a main discussion on a topic requested by the listeners, presented as a lighthearted and educational conversation about fossils, evolution, deep time, and more. Before the main discussion, each episode also includes a news segment, covering recent research related to paleontology and evolution. Each episode ends with the answer to a question submitted by sub ...
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Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, Future Ecologies is a podcast exploring our eco-social relationships through stories, science, music, and soundscapes. Every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light — weaving together narrative and interviews with expert knowledge holders. The format varies: from documentary storytelling to stream-of-consciousness sound collage, and beyond. Episodes are released only when they're ready, not on a fixed schedule (but approximately ...
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TWiP is a monthly netcast about eukaryotic parasites. Vincent Racaniello and Dickson Despommier, science Professors from Columbia University, deconstruct parasites, how they cause illness, and how you can prevent infections.
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Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more. Subscribe today for the latest medical, health and bioscience insights from geniuses in their field(s).
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Astronomy Cast

Fraser Cain and Dr. Pamela Gay

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Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (Planetary Science Institute), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported thru patreon.com/AstronomyCast.
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There’s a lot going on up there. Join space reporter Brendan Byrne each week as he explores space exploration. From efforts to launch humans into deep space, to the probes exploring our solar system, "Are We There Yet?" brings you the latest in news from the space beat. Listen to interviews with astronauts, engineers and visionaries as humanity takes its next giant leap exploring our universe.
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There is a shakeup in the bird world: ornithologists are renaming every bird whose common name is based on a human! So why can't we do this for trees? We can, and do, in this bonus episode unlocked from our support platform Completely Arbortrary Treemium! Become a Treemium member today and unlock a treasure trove of cool rewards at arbortrarypod.su…
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Some more long introductory remarks and commentary throughout readings of the closing pages of the chapter culminating in the explanation of the "punchline" conclusion of the chapter which is: "Necessary truth is the subject matter of mathematics. It is not the reward we get for doing mathematics". This is a good exploration of fallibility, the rel…
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Sugar seems to be in everything we eat. While experts have warned against its health side effects, people continue to consume it in staggering quantities. Why is sugar so addictive? How can we break free from our cravings and take care of our bodies instead? In this episode, we sit down with Dr. Nicole Avena to discuss her newest book, Sugarless: A…
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A VerySpatial Podcast Shownotes – Episode 732 28 February 2024 Catching up on news and considering our perspectives Click to directly download MP3 YouTube (audio only) http://traffic.libsyn.com/avsp/AVSP_Episode732.mp3 News: Moon landing Korea’s KASS operational US DOJ moves to dismiss Ligado case Esri to roll out AI Assistants in 2024 Topic: Are o…
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Eric Berger of Ars Technica joins me to talk about Intuitive Machine’s successful landing despite so many issues on the mission, the future of CLPS, and the tough questions facing NASA and its budget. This episode of Main Engine Cut Off is brought to you by 36 executive producers—Tyler, Lee Hopkins, Better Every Day Studios, Joel, Jan, Will and Lar…
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Welcome to a special edition of the 16th Ask Me Anything (AMA) episode, part of Huberman Lab Premium, recorded in Sydney, Australia. This episode is a recording of a live stream AMA, originally exclusive to our Premium members. We've decided to make the full-length version available to everyone, including non-members of Huberman Lab Premium. Huberm…
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Keeping water out of the stratosphere could be a low-risk geoengineering approach, and using magnets to drive medical robots inside the body First up this week, a new approach to slowing climate change: dehydrating the stratosphere. Staff Writer Paul Voosen joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the risks and advantages of this geoengineering technique…
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Why everyone wants to get back to the moon - a special episode with Kevin Fong. The United States has just returned to the Moon for the first time in 50 years. But they are not the only country in the world with their sights set on space exploration. Why are countries like India, China, Japan and Saudi Arabia trying to complete their own lunar land…
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The human brain is a mystery that scientists are still attempting to unravel. Many experts say that we know far more about the nature of the Universe than we know about the brain. Is this true? If so, what makes this wrinkly gray organ so complex? In this episode, we sit down with Dr. René Marois to discuss the neural basis of attention in humans –…
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This episode—which is Number 92—is all about the value of desert ecosystems as habitats for birds. Deserts are important for the birds that are adapted to live in them—birds that can handle the harsh conditions. Deserts are home to relatively few bird species. Only the polar regions and maybe some parts of the open ocean have less bird diversity. E…
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The remaining dates of 2024 will take a big leap. They’ll jump over a day of the week. That’s because this is leap year, and today is leap day — extending the year from 365 days to 366.Leap years are needed to keep the calendar in sync with the seasons. Without it, the equinoxes and solstices would slide across the calendar. So after many centuries…
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This is really "episode 0" but not quite because we do indeed get to some readings and unpackings of the chapter. But in the overall scheme, that forms a minor part of a longer introduction to the "common sense" understanding of time and then to some relativity (of simultaneity) and reflections on the work of other physicists and popularisers. Note…
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“The measure of intelligence is the ability to change.” ― Albert Einstein In a world that often values certainty and consistency, it can be hard to admit when we need to change our minds. The concept of changing... READ MORE The post Mindstuck: the science of stubbornness and how to change your mind- interview with Michael McQueen Season 4 Ep 2 app…
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Every experience, connection, meal, and countless other environmental factors can influence whether specific genes are turned on or off, affecting all kinds of physiological processes, including aging. Kara Fitzgerald provides eye-opening insights into this topic and so much more. Tune in to explore: Epigenetics – what it means and the latest devel…
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Saturn's so-called Death Star moon Mimas may harbor a global subsurface ocean based on analysis of Cassini data of the tiny moon's orbit and rotation. And in the distant universe, what was previously thought to be a run-of-the-mill star in our own galaxy turns out to be a quasar thousands of times brighter than our entire galaxy itself. Join us on …
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In Immeasurable Weather: Meteorological Data and Settler Colonialism from 1820 to Hurricane Sandy (Duke UP, 2023), Sara J. Grossman explores how environmental data collection has been central to the larger project of settler colonialism in the United States. She draws on an extensive archive of historical and meteorological data spanning two centur…
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We don’t often delve into the Triassic since Dave is not well versed in that time and the animals that were around then, but there were some very important animals that we’ve unduly overlooked across the last 9 series. Happily, today we can redress a large part of that with this episode on Coelophysis. Known from hundreds of skeletons, it’s one of …
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Today: we're turning animals into robots! All the weirdest and wackiest ways that roboticists and researchers have played robo-god with animals. From robosaurus, to robot bees, and robo falcons, Adam and Katie discuss whether robots will inherit the earth. Guest: Adam Ganser Footnotes: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1t7NmSAXc6vg0zMZkMHIZKlXSQI_…
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Depictions of the sky have been found on walls and ceilings that date back thousands of years. Other depictions are encoded in the layouts of monuments and burial sites. The oldest known portable view of the heavens is ancient as well — at least 3600 years old. The Nebra Sky Disc was discovered 25 years ago, in Germany. It was buried with swords, a…
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After the first soft Moon landing from the US in over 50 years, Ken Kremer shares his excitement for Intuitive Machine's Odysseus lander, NASA's ongoing lunar ambitions, and his concerns over China stealing a lunar edge. Also UK Space Agency Head of Space Exploration, Libby Jackson on Artemis 2 and 3, Gateway and the all-British Axiom mission. Plus…
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Eyal joins TWiP to solve the case of the Female Traveler with Intermittent Fever and Ring Enhancements in the Liver. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Daniel Griffin, and Christina Naula Guest: Eyal Leshem Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Links for this episode Become a patron of TWiP Case Study for TWiP 22…
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How serious is the threat from space weapons? How should we handle the situation with international treaties? Is there a way to ensure the enforcement of them and what are the risks if somebody breaks them? Figuring out the answers with Dr Matthew Powell from the University of Portsmouth. 🦄 Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday 📚…
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Julie Klapstein, founding CEO of Availity, long-time healthcare executive, and a16z Bio + Health's newest advisory partner, joins Julie Yoo, general partner at a16z Bio + Health. Together, they delve into Julie Klapstein's rich career journey, which has spanned several decades of progress in healthcare. They also discussed building Availity, her ti…
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What is it like to be responsible for the safekeeping of the ancestors of everyone in the world? In this episode, we travel to the National Museum of Ethiopia to see our most famous fossil relative – Lucy – and meet Yared Assefa, the person who takes care of her and all of our Ethiopian fossil ancestors and relatives. If you love fossils, you won't…
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Is aging the root cause of disease and the breakdown of our bodies? If we can find a way to alter the process, many advances in health and longevity may no longer be out of reach. Press play to learn: Why we age How some organisms appear to be biologically immortal Potential developments to interact with aging coming down the pipeline Co-Founder of…
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Rediscover the band that CHANGED MUSIC FOREVER. RUN D.M.C. were the Beatles of Hip-Hop. Darryl "DMC" McDaniels was a comic book nerd who pretended his way into hip-hop stardom and changed the world forever. We dive into Darryl’s journey from a shy Catholic school boy, being bullied to becoming an icon in the music industry. Darryl shares his strugg…
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How do you make some things stay hot and others stay cool? Neil deGrasse Tyson, with the help of comedian Chuck Nice, explains the physics of heat transfer, insulation, and why your Stanley cup can keep your drink cold during a fire. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/neils…
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When you’re headed toward the Moon or planets, there are no signposts to keep you on the right track. Fortunately, nature provides its own markers: the stars. Spacecraft orient themselves by sighting on the Sun and one or more other stars. In the early days of space exploration, the most popular of those stars was Canopus. Canopus is a good navigat…
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Astronomy Cast Ep. 709: Space Weapons by Fraser Cain & Dr. Pamela Gay Streamed live on Feb 19, 2024. [My apologies for Fraser’s audio dropouts. We’re not sure how it happened as it wasn’t happening at his studio. Audio is a black art, IMHO. Rich) Last week we learned that Russia might be planning nuclear weapons to take out satellites in space. Wha…
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Where do auroras come from on rogue planets? Can we refuel the Sun to make it last longer? What's going on with space nuke tests? Answering all these questions and more in this week's Q&A show. 🦄 Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/universetoday 📚 Suggest books in the book club: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/1198440-universe-today-boo…
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Can acne stem from causes which many sources may not have told you before? While older techniques can be practical, recent advancements and discoveries can significantly expedite the process. Listen up to learn: Which skin conditions are common and how to spot improvement New Techniques which may work better for you Which topical products may be be…
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Matt Walker welcomes his dear friend, the epic sleep researcher and clinician, Dr. Michael Gradisar, to the podcast to join him in exploring the profound influence of light on sleep quality. Dr. Gradisar's groundbreaking research and clinical proficiency in pediatric sleep disorders and circadian rhythm disruptions have reshaped the field, guiding …
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In this episode, my guest is Dr. Becky Kennedy, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, bestselling author, and founder of Good Inside, an education platform for parents and parents-to-be. We discuss actionable protocols for raising resilient, emotionally healthy kids and effective alternatives to typical forms of reward and punishment that instead teach c…
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Sorry to my Patreon subscribers, since this is mostly a rerun episode from April 2019. It’s a fun one, though! The teensy pumpkin toadlet [photo by Diogo B. Provete – http://calphotos.berkeley.edu, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6271494]: The electromagnetic spectrum. Look how tiny the visible light spectrum is on thi…
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Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, is in the south at nightfall. If you keep your eye on it for a few seconds, though, you’ll see that Sirius isn’t steady. It twinkles fiercely. It gets brighter and fainter, and it changes color rapidly — from red to blue to pure white. The twinkling is beautiful — unless you’re an astronomer. Twinkling b…
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Space physics is a crowd-pleaser and a ‘way in’ for many physicists. There are few things in physics more memorable than seeing Jupiter for the first time through a telescope. We chat with William H who teaches GCSE Astronomy to three schools at the same time via Teams. He makes a great case for teaching astronomy, not just growing the excitement o…
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Fossil hunting is like playing the lottery, your odds of hitting big are infinitesimal, but it can happen. Such was the case for Dr. Bob Gastaldo and colleagues when they unearthed the remains of Sanfordiacaulis densifolia, an extinct tree from the Carboniferous Period unlike anything we have ever seen. Join me and Dr. Gastaldo as we take a deep di…
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Maggie Jackson sits down with us to discuss her latest book, Uncertain: The Wisdom and Wonder of Being Unsure. Nominated for a National Book Award and added to three Best Books of 2023 lists, Uncertain helps readers understand why they should seek “not-knowing” in times of angst and flux. How can we harness the neglected power of uncertainty? Uncer…
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The Overland Trail into the American West is one of the most culturally recognizable symbols of the American past: white covered wagons traversing the plains, filled with heroic pioneers embodying the nation's manifest destiny. In American Burial Ground: A New History of the Overland Trail (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2023), University of Nev…
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The brightest star of Orion stands due south at nightfall, marking one of the hunter’s feet. Rigel shines blue-white — a dramatic contrast to orange Betelgeuse, Orion’s second-brightest light. Both stars are supergiants — stars that are among the biggest and heaviest in the galaxy. Rigel, for example, is up to a couple of dozen times the mass of th…
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TWiV reviews resurgence of Lassa fever in West Africa, at least 3 paralytic cases of cVDPV2 in Zimbabwe, CWD from eating prion-laden plants, measles in New Orleans and Broward County Florida, failure of Florida Surgeon General to support vaccination, a measles variant in Switzerland, SARS-CoV-2 persistent infections, leaky blood-brain-barrier for l…
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Catch Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. Hear the details in this week’s stargazing guide podcast, Star Diary. Make an animation of Jupiter: https://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/astrophotography/astrophoto-tips/planetary-animation Transcription: www.skyatnightmagazine.com/podcasts/star-diary-26-feb-2024 Check out our on-demand astronomy webinars to learn ever…
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Can aging be curbed in order to improve the longevity of the body? With certain advancements, humans may be able to find a way to "cure" aging. Listen up to learn: The seven components of aging Where the most mitochondria can be found If aging can be truly reversed Dr. Sandra Kaufmann, the founder of The Kaufmann Anti-aging Institute, shares her wo…
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Since the dawn of the Space Age, in 1957, the United States and other countries have sent tens of thousands of objects into space — some into orbit, and others far beyond. Yet the first object known to have reached space did so well before the Space Age — 75 years ago today. It didn’t go into orbit, but it did reach 244 miles — well above the altit…
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