Best Elizabeth Gaskell podcasts we could find (Updated August 2019)
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Cranford is the best-known novel of the 19th century English writer Elizabeth Gaskell. It was first published in 1851 as a serial in the magazine Household Words, which was edited by Charles Dickens.
 
Mrs. Gaskell as she was popularly known, had a hard and lonely childhood, spent with various aunts and relatives after her mother died and her father left her. The young Elizabeth met and married a clergyman and moved to Manchester with him. It was here that she developed her strong sense of social justice and the themes which form the basis of her writing. Her biography of her dear friend Charlotte Bronte is considered a classic and provides a wonderfully human picture of the Yorkshire geni ...
 
This story opens with a young girl on a visit to a stately mansion, which is a local tourist attraction. Exhausted and waiting for the rest of the party to finish the tour, she falls asleep under a tree. She is discovered by the daughter of the house and the governess, who comfort her and put her to bed in the governess's room, promising to wake her before the tourists leave. However, the governess forgets and the girl is stranded in the mansion. Her father arrives to take her home. Many yea ...
 
T
Tourist Podcast
Rare
 
A Travel Podcast with comedians as your tour guides.Forget Lonely Planet, join Vic Elizabeth Turnbull, alongside your favourite comedians and well-known faces on trips to best kept secrets, backstreet dives and some unlikely destinations.
 
Cousin Phillis (1864) is a novel by Elizabeth Gaskell about Paul Manning, a youth of seventeen who moves to the country and befriends his mother's family and his second cousin Phillis Holman, who is confused by her own placement at the edge of adolescence. Most critics agree that Cousin Phillis is Gaskell's crowning achievement in the short novel. The story is uncomplicated; its virtues are in the manner of its development and telling. (Summary by Wikipedia)
 
Love, murder and class commentary in Mrs Gaskell's usual brilliant style! This novel was originally serialised and published by Charles Dickens, with whom Mrs Gaskell had several disagreements. She chose to avoid melodrama and concentrate on psychological realism to produce a moving story of people meeting and parting across class divides. - Summary by Beth Thomas
 
Set in Victorian England, North and South is the story of Margaret Hale, a young woman whose life is turned upside down when her family relocates to northern England. As an outsider from the agricultural south, Margaret is initially shocked by the aggressive northerners of the dirty, smoky industrial town of Milton. But as she adapts to her new home, she defies social conventions with her ready sympathy and defense of the working poor. Her passionate advocacy leads her to repeatedly clash wi ...
 
"Maggie Brown is torn between her mother who constantly tells her to live for her selfish brother (to whom she gives all her love) to her wish to marry Frank and live for herself. Maggie's plight for independence shows the change in women's role, which started to take place during that time. But it also keeps to the tradition of an almost Cinderella story: the pure woman does the best for everyone but herself and is rewarded for that. In addition, this is a very interesting story, written in ...
 
O
Overinvested
Monthly+
 
Overinvested is a weekly podcast from pop culture obsessives Gavia Baker-Whitelaw and Morgan Leigh Davies. Each episode, Gavia and Morgan dive into a film, TV show, or comic they just can't stop thinking about.
 
If you like Jane Austen, you will probably like this book!Mrs. Gaskell, as she was often referred to, is considered one of the greatest British novelists of the Victorian era. She was one of the earliest novelists ever to use dialect in her works, finding often that no word but the vernacular would suffice to convey the meaning she wanted to achieve. She was the author of The Life of Charlotte Brontë, a much-acclaimed and sometimes-reviled biography of her friend and peer.Wives and Daughters ...
 
The novel begins in the 1790s in the coastal town of Monkshaven. Sylvia Robson lives with her parents on a farm, and is loved by her rather dull Quaker cousin Philip. She, however, meets and falls in love with Charlie Kinraid, a sailor on a whaling vessel, and they become engaged, although few people know of the engagement. But Charlie gets press-ganged and has to leave without a word... (Summary from Wikipedia)
 
Cranford is set in a small market town populated largely by a number of respectable ladies. It tells of their secrets and foibles, their gossip and their romances as they face the challenges of dealing with new inhabitants to their society and innovations to their settled existence. It was first published between 1851 and 1853 as episodes in Charles Dickens’ Journal Household Words. Appended to this recording is a short sequel, The Cage at Cranford, written ten years later and published in t ...
 
Elizabeth Gaskell's last novel was serialized in Cornhill Magazine from 1864 to 1866, and completed by her editor posthumously. It looks at English life in the 1830s through the experiences of Molly Gibson, the daughter of a widowed doctor growing up in the provincial town of Hollingford. When Mr. Gibson decides to marry again, Molly is forced to contend with a pretentious stepmother, but consoled by a close friendship with Cynthia, her new stepsister. The girls' relations with the local res ...
 
This novella by the acclaimed Elizabeth Gaskell follows the reminiscences and life of aristocratic Lady Ludlow, told through the eyes of one of her charges, the young Margaret Dawson. Lady Ludlow epitomizes the unwillingness of the old English gentry to accept the progression of social reform and technology, such as education for the poor and religious leniency. She reminisces about her friends in the French revolution and tries to protect and guide the numerous young ladies she has taken un ...
 
North and South is a social novel that tries to show the industrial North and its conflicts in the mid-19th century as seen by an outsider, a socially sensitive lady from the South. The story: the heroine, Margaret Hale, is the daughter of a Nonconformist minister who moves to the fictional industrial town of Milton after leaving the Church of England. The town is modeled after Manchester, where Gaskell lived as the wife of a Unitarian minister. The change of lifestyle shocks Margaret, who s ...
 
Round the Sofa (1859), is a book of stories by the lady that Charles Dickens called his “dear Scheherazade” due to her skill as a story teller. That Lady was Mrs. Elizabeth Gaskell (North and South, Wives and Daughters, Cranford etc.). Mrs. Gaskell begins with Round the Sofa, a short story which she uses as a device to stitch together six previously published stories into a single work. It introduces us to a set of characters who take turns to recount stories to one another during their week ...
 
Ladies of Horror Fiction was created to bring about a multi-dimensional way to support women (either cisgender or those who identify as female) who either write in the horror genre or review in it.This will be done via the website, the podcast, the yearly Instagram Challenge, read-a-longs featuring said authors, and other activities that have not yet been determined.
 
"Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life" was Mrs Gaskell's first full-length novel. It was published anonymously in that tumultuous year of political change, 1848 - only a few months after the Communist Manifesto co-authored by her fellow Manchester-resident, Friedrich Engels. Engels's experience as agent in his father's cotton-spinning factory motivated him to write "The Condition of the Working Class in England", a classic account of the sufferings of the poor under the factory-system.Eliz ...
 
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show series
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
This week, Morgan and Gavia cap off the podcast's summer book club with a discussion of Elizabeth Gaskell's Victorian romance "North and South." They compare the novel to other nineteenth century marriage novels and evaluate its depiction of the industrial revolution and overwrought male emotions.By Overinvested Podcast.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
Join Toni as she reads body horror stories by Tracy Fahey and Gabriela Houston.By Ladies of Horror Fiction.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
This week, Gavia and Morgan discuss Jennifer Kent's cult horror film "The Babadook" (2014). They consider the merits of watching horror at the cinema and at home, compare this film's family drama structure to "Hereditary," and explain the origin of one of the internet's most inexplicable memes.By Overinvested Podcast.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
More great books at LoyalBooks.comBy Elizabeth Gaskell.
 
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